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Discussion Starter #1
I single-hand a lot and do not like the very large blind spot that my low cut genoa makes on the lee side of the boat. It is not a true deck-sweeper, but it does rest on the pulpit and lifelines.

I would be perfectly happy to give up some peformance in order to be able to see under the sail, but can't figure out a good solution for doing that. The genny is on a CDI rolling furler and there are no traditional reefing points. Obviously I can furl it part way on the roller, but by the time I do that enough to see under the sail it's halfway in which is way too much. Like I said, I'm willing to compromise performance, but reefing that far on the furler makes it almost ineffective except in a big blow.

Any suggestions?
 

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One of None
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I've seen head sails with "windows" in them. I suppose it's something a loft could install not too expensively. but maybe there is a good reason to not have them?
 

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It sounds like you need to have it recut with a higher foot. Assuming a dacron (as opposed to laminate) sails it shouldn't be that expensive. And only takes a few days.
 

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Recutting the sail to take a foot or two off the luff and along the foot, then reinstalling it on the furler with an appropriate pennant so that it still goes to the top of the furler foil will 'open up' a veiwing area under headsail... but that's a pretty big hit in sail area.

A window will help, but will depend on your position in the cockpit as to how helpful it would be, as well as the sail trim/point of sail at any given time.

Or do like the rest of us.. periodically go to the leeward side for a look-see, or send a crew to do the same.
 

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When a sail is cut down in size they cut off the foot and the leach and it will shorten the luff length. you will need to add a pendent to the tack so the sail will go full hoist to be able to see under it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I knew that pendants were a potential solution for a hanked on sail, but how would it work for one on a furler? I actually have a little room still at the top of the forestay. Would the pendant attach below the drum? If it's directly to the tack of the sail, wouldn't the pendant get fouled when you furl the sail? Maybe I'm picturing this wrong (not at my boat).
 

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The way you are describing your sail, is the LP greater than 140%? I’d be less inclined in shortening the hoist on your genoa. Depending upon your furler, a sail-pendant combination might not furl evenly if it is under a load (if you are “reefing”, for example). A better way would be to raise the clew by giving your sail a “Yankee cut”. This will raise the clew without raising the tack. The downside on both of these methods is you will be reducing the LP. If you want to keep the LP (and preserving your “power”), I’d recommend you have a transparent “window” panel installed. Or periodically look underneath/behind the sail. In heavy traffic situations I will occasionally luff up a bit to get a better view behind the sail.
 

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I knew that pendants were a potential solution for a hanked on sail, but how would it work for one on a furler? I actually have a little room still at the top of the forestay. Would the pendant attach below the drum? If it's directly to the tack of the sail, wouldn't the pendant get fouled when you furl the sail? Maybe I'm picturing this wrong (not at my boat).
It causes no issues with furlers. I used a spectra/dyneema climbing sling which I had laying around for a pennant. If you have room at the top (not a full hoist) then you're set! Just remember to adjust your sheet cars aft accordingly.

Here are the climbing slings. They're all extremely strong and spec'd for human climbing applications so the quality control is good. Mine has lasted for years in the elements.
Wild Country 12mm Dyneema Sling - Climbing - Gear Express

Nylon slings should work just as well
Edelweiss 18mm Flat Tape Slings - Gear Express

MedSailor
 

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As long as they're not too long,.. if truly nylon there's more stretch than dyneema...
I needed 6" of extension if I recall and I just took a 12" sling and doubled it upon itself. Half the length and twice as strong.

Agreed about the stretch. Spend the extra $2 and splurge on the Dyneema. ;)

MedSailor
 

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S/V Wyndwitch - Morgan 24
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I have similar issues and made up a variety of dyneema soft shackles which now adapt to various headsails as needed to allow me a decent view. I also ordered my working foresail as a 110, with a clue about 32-36" off the deck basically a Yankee. Since using the soft shackles no close calls! :)

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I317 using Tapatalk
 

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I have a great combination for my jib that allows full visibility beneath it, and I don't believe I'm sacrificing any performance.


My Alado roller furling system sits atop the forestay's turnbuckle, and the sail is cut quite high. It's a 100-percent jib, but it really doesn't make any difference if it were a 150. As you can see by the photo, there is no blind spot, and I like it that way. I've been on boats where you couldn't see a thing beneath the jib, and personally, I thought this was really stupid. Hell, if you're going to sail blind on one side of the boat, why not just close your eyes and sail completely blind. Makes absolutely no sense at all to me, but what the Hell do I know?

Good luck,

Gary :cool:
 

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Re raising the jib off the deck with furling - I do it with a short line and have no problem. Re window in sail - I have one on one of my jibs but it is useless. Have to go forward to see anything through it.
I do like having my jibs off the deck a bit, lets any water shipped go back where it belongs faster.
 

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Learning to steer from leeward helps too. My other jib is quite low, particularly because the steering position is high. It doesn't bother me (a regular peek to leeward is enough).
 

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Once known as Hartley18
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You could always clip an old GoPro or similar to the pulpit wired back to a display at the helm.

High-end Raymarine (and similar) plotters have a facility for displaying video alongside the chart/radar plot for situations just like this.
 

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I run a n odd sized, "85%" jib, just so's I *can* see! It's on a pendant of old jib sheet and works out very well. Foot is near even with the boom. While don't have the power of a 110; or even more jib; I am able. to see where I'm goin and, what's coming. At my stage of sailing 'noob-ness', I can live without a full headsail a lot more than I can survive not seeing. Going fast blindly, then falling off/coming back up so ya can see what's what, is just silly
 

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I've never seen a jib window you could actually see through. The ones I've seen have either been yellowed or stained by salt spray. Even the clear ones distorted so much that the window didn't seem worthwhile.

A few years ago, I got a 100% jib for my boat, mostly for single handling and winter sailing and I never took it off. I'm sure this will vary from boat to boat, but my boat tacks so much more easily and I've got better visibility. I don't go out if there's no wind, but I'm not noticing a horrific performance hit.
 

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I had sails made once by a well know sailmaker. Their instinct if you don't talk to them is to get you the best performance possible. Their first cut was pretty much a deck sweeper. Even sitting to leeward the view forward was blocked. We short hand all the time and had it recut.

I am sure you give up some performance, but if you're like us and you short hand your boat a frequently, seeing from the cockpit sure makes things easier.
 
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