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Discussion Starter #1
My 2013 Beneteau Oceanis 48, is on the hard for it’s second bottom job. The first time out, I let the yard do its thing without much supervision or input. This time, interesting questions are surfacing to which neither I nor the yard personnel seem to know the answers.

The elliptical shape of the saildrive shaft drops through a round hole in the hull of the boat. The resulting void is covered by a two part panel that is flush with the bottom of the hull.

There is an approximately 1/2" gap between the panels and the saildrive shaft. I am guessing that the space between these panels and the place where the drive passes through the structural part of the hull is about six inches.

Whatever the precise measurements, there is a void above the bottom of the hull and below the top of the saildrive housing assembly where several gallons of water are free to slosh to and fro.

It seems like it would be a fairly major undertaking to remove those panels to gain access to the top of the saildrive housing assembly for debris removal, cleaning and painting. On the one hand, doing this as a part of a normal bottom job seems excessive. On the other hand, totally ignoring that whole part of the sail-drive seems sloppy.

What is the normal and recommended procedure for dealing with this hidden part of the saildrive housing?

I have a similar issue with the bow thruster. While none of that surface area is hidden, a lot of it is poorly accessible—if not for painting then at least for sanding. Like the saildrive fairing, there is a separate piece that runs the full width of the bow thruster cylinder’s underside. It looks like it was put there to provide access to this area but, perhaps it was put there just to make installation easier. Would it be a major undertaking to remove and replace?

How should I be thinking about removing the old paint from this part of the hull? How to paint it afresh? It looks like the paint was just slopped on with a brush last time. Sooner or later the old paint is going to have to be removed.

Suggestions anyone?
 

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I don't think you mean to use the word "shaft" here. "Body" perhaps? A shaft refers to a (usually) cylindrical part that (generally) transfers rotation, for example, your "prop shaft" transfers rotation from your gear box to your propeller.

Take a look at the documentation for your saildrive. For details about the installation, ask Beneteau. Just in case no one here has a similar installation and can shed light.
 

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I'd call Beneteau. They're good at answering customer service questions, and their advice will be based on perhaps the best knowledge of the boat.

Now that long distance isn't "deposit one dollar for the first three minutes" anymore...(G)...
 

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I don’t mean to imply that deferred maintenance is a good practice….just offering an observation.

For what its worth, my boat has a swing keel that sits up in an underwater trunk. Due to access issues, I have not painted the inside of the trunk and suspected it would be covered with critters. I dove on it last week…plenty of sea life on the hull, rudder and prop……nothing in the trunk or on the centerboard.

Have no idea why that would be unless they just don’t like small dark areas.

Best,
doo
 

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The little bit I think I know about saildrives says there's supposed to be a rubber boot over another rubber boot, both properly adhered to the hull so that no water can enter the system, or at least, no harmful flora or fauna, flotsam or jetsam. Is this not the case?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I went ahead and removed the fairing plate. It was pretty nasty up in there. The Yanmar guy had suggested using a boroscope to visually inspect the lower diaphragm. Fat chance you could have seen anything useful that way. The plate was just held in place with 4200 and it was a quick job to cut it free without damaging it. This enabled us to remove all of the barnacles and other growth and will also allow us to get a fresh coat of Trinadad SR on that part of the hull and Trilux 33 on the top part of the drive housing. Now that I have done this and realize how easy it is, I plan to do it again every time I do the bottom.

The fairing plate is pretty flimsey. Even though we got it out and cleaned up without damaging it this time, I have asked for a quotation on a spare. Hopefully it will still be easy to get and not prohibitively expensive on a model that is still in production.
 

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if this is anything like the volvo drives theres a rubber membrane that is supposed to go between the plate and the hull and then sleeves over the leg of the saildrive. it is supposed to be glued to the saildrive. ive always wondered if adding a gear clamp would help hold it better.
 
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