SailNet Community banner

1 - 20 of 51 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Looking for your thoughts? There is a 1985 Aloha 8.2 for sale including a dinghy with a nice 2 hp motor. This model was built with a outboard option and now has a Honda 15 hp. four stroke for power.
The owner has liked this option especially for the added space in the inboard compartment. Is this a good arrg't or a downside for resale?

Your thoughts appreciated.

Cheers,
 

·
Registered
Corsair 24
Joined
·
4,594 Posts
id go for it...the boat isnt THAT big

Ill be adding a 15 to my boat in the meantime untill I get somehwere decent where a repower inboard is doable
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,181 Posts
IMO it depends how you plan to use the boat and local conditions. If you have to fight strong currents and choppy sea, inboard is a much better option. But the simplicity and low cost of an outboard is very tempting. Just make sure the motor mount allows for easy access to the motor controls while under way, and that the prop is sufficiently deep under water when deployed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
578 Posts
Biggest consideration should be is number of boats they built with inboard vs outboard. If Ouyang built 300 (I don't know how many they actually built) of this model and a handful had inboards you will be challenged to move the boat when you decide to trade up or get out. Considering the build year most Ontario based boat builders of 27' and up had committed to inboard diesels, mostly Yanmars, some Westerbekes & Universals. The larger builders stayed away from the 'off brands' due to price and quality perception in the market. How long will it take to resell? I DON'T UNDERSTAND WHY BOAT LISTINGS DON'T HAVE A LISTING DATE like real estate listings. Shouldn't buyers know how long a boat has been on the market & what has happened to the price over time? And why is there no Boatproof or Boatfacts like auto resale, at least for boats with engines?

For the 12k list price you could find a similar vintage CS27 with Yanmar inboard. Some find the boat less than attractive with the high freeboard and extreme tumblehome, but the boat is simple, well built, is a pleasure to sail and has a strong association support. Disclosure - I am biased as I assembled about 200 27's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,033 Posts
You haven't bought it yet and you're already thinking of selling it? :)

From Sailboatdata:"Designer: Robert Perry" --- if that's our very own Bob Perry, maybe he will chip in with his expertise.

My understanding with outboards is that beside the normal care and feeding you get with every engine, the main problem is the prop coming out of the water when the Ocean starts getting up on her hind legs. As usual, "It depends." When & where you sail, and under what conditions, will determine the fitness. She's a fine-looking model, best of luck to you both.

Fair winds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
Lots of pros and cons to consider.

First, an outboard solution is less-expensive... the outboard version of the Aloha will cost less (but fetch less when you sell). If / when you need repair work, an outboard again will cost less... substantially less. Though some might counter it would need more frequent repair.

If your outboard crapped out, you could source a used replacement on Ebay or Craigslist and be back in business in days... I scored a used 15 HP 2-stroke for $600, tuned it and replaced the impeller at home, then installed it in under an hour; I was out of service less than a week. If your diesel crapped out, you're probably talking several weeks (you could lose 1/3 or 1/2 a season in Ontario).

The other knock on outboards is that they can lift out in a rough, pitching sea. While true for stern-hung outboards, it may not be valid when the boat has a purpose-built outboard well in the stern. My 28-footer has a purpose-built well, and with my long-shaft 15HP outboard, I submit my prop is just as deep as an inboard design's prop would be. I have a remote throttle & shifter and electric start so the operating convenience is the equal of an inboard. And with a slot cut in my transom, I can raise my prop out of the water when sailing (no drag) or on the mooring (no fouling).

Yes, an outboard runs on gas... much more volatile than diesel fuel. 4 stroke outboards are quiet and reasonably efficient... 2 strokes not so much. But diesels are louder than either.

Your 27' boat may be in the same league as my 28 footer; it is getting to the point where older boats of this size are not very attractive on the resale market... if you had to replace the diesel it would require you to invest around half the boat's entire value.

In my opinion, in boats of older vintage in the 27-28' size range, I'd always opt for the less costly, simpler design solution... that which gets me on the water while minimizing my spend on a boat that won't fetch much at resale time.
 

·
'81 H22 & '86 Legend 37
Joined
·
75 Posts
For myself I love outboards on sailboats. Minimal noise in the cabin when motoring, no cutlass bearing that drips, no diesel fuel and oil odor in the bilge, more stowage space inside the boat, very economical and easy to maintain.

Very large offshore powerboats and fishing boats use twin, triple and quad outboards. Never could figure out why nobody designed larger sailboats for use with a 40 or 50 horse outboard on a jackplate to lift it out of the water for sailing instead of bolting a noisy rattletrap Yanmar inside the hull. The modern four-stroke, direct-injected outboards approach diesel efficiency too. And if you ever lose your rudder the outboard provides backup steering.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
19,488 Posts
Outboards make a lot of sense for many of the reasons stated above.. but there are two major reasons to not choose that path..

#1 - few outboard installations are truly effective in rough conditions when you might need them the most - in many cases the prop spends more time out of the water than in. For sheltered coastal cruising and primarily in/out of harbour they are obviously the ticket..

#2 - Sorry, but who would put an outboard on something as pretty as this.. even a 20 foot version...

 

·
'81 H22 & '86 Legend 37
Joined
·
75 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Outboards make a lot of sense for many of the reasons stated above.. but there are two major reasons to not choose that path..

#1 - few outboard installations are truly effective in rough conditions when you might need them the most - in many cases the prop spends more time out of the water than in. For sheltered coastal cruising and primarily in/out of harbour they are obviously the ticket..

#2 - Sorry, but who would put an outboard on something as pretty as this.. even a 20 foot version...

For sure you couldn't do that to your boat, it is beautiful!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
One of the neatest things I ever saw on a 30 footer was this:
Website-Main - Replacing a sailboat inboard diesel with a 4 stroke outboard

Our Legend has the same type of transom and I was going to do the same thing. Then we put a Monitor windvane on it and that nixed that idea.
Is that your website? If so, it's amazing. I'd like to find out how to bend stainless or aluminum tubing for a Bimini at home without spending a fortune, other wise might as well buy one. The material part is no problem as we have the machine and the expertise to fabricate that.

Thanks,
 

·
'81 H22 & '86 Legend 37
Joined
·
75 Posts
Is that your website? If so, it's amazing. I'd like to find out how to bend stainless or aluminum tubing for a Bimini at home without spending a fortune, other wise might as well buy one. The material part is no problem as we have the machine and the expertise to fabricate that.
Kalina-Lona, no it's not our website. It is just one that I bookmarked quite some time back because it shows how that fellow built a nice jackplate for an outboard on a 30' sailboat.

A regular mandrel tubing bender works fine for .050 wall 316 stainless tubing. But you won't get constant diameter on the tube in the bend because it stretches it. The bimini frames for powerboats sometimes work for smaller sailboats if you can modify it to get rid of the forward strut to clear your mainsheet when you swing the boom out on a reach. There's folks who build custom bimini frames for sailboats too, but they're usually not cheap. The powerboat ones are a dime a dozen if you can find one with the right width and cut it down or modify it for clearance on your backstay, boom and mainsheet
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,993 Posts
Another drawback of outboard that hasn't been touched on is fuel consumption. Compared to an inboard diesel, outboards are serious gas guzzlers so you will have to carry a lot of extra fuel to get the same range as a diesel.

While it is true that replacing a diesel is more expensive, the fact is that a properly maintained diesel will last year's longer than any outboard. They are dead simple to repair and will be more reliable in the long run. Trying to work on an outboard when it breaks down on the water can be pretty challenging too.

Having said that, if you don't plan on venturing too far from civilization and gas docks, the outboard could be just fine for your purposes. Modern 4 strokes are amazingly smooth and quiet!
 

·
'81 H22 & '86 Legend 37
Joined
·
75 Posts
Another drawback of outboard that hasn't been touched on is fuel consumption. Compared to an inboard diesel, outboards are serious gas guzzlers
Our little 6hp Yachtwin on our 81 Hunter 22, pushing the boat at 5.7kts GPS, plus towing a 10 foot dinghy, at about 2/3 throttle will run for 12 hours on 4 gallons of gas. That little Yachtwin has thousands and thousands of hours on it, we've taken that boat on two 1,000nm cruises, and all we've ever done to it is replace the water pump impeller and put a new starter rope in it.
 

·
Owl
Joined
·
292 Posts
And I thought this was going to be a thread about why nobody installs inboard/outboard (sterndrive) motors in sailboats.
 
1 - 20 of 51 Posts
Top