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Incredible is the right word, thanks for posting.

John
 

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Once known as Hartley18
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Works of art they are and slow they definitely are not.

If you want to see more a quick search on "panerai classic yachts challenge" will bring up plenty of eye-candy to feast your eyes on.
 

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Wonderful that some people have the vision and the deep pockets to save these classic yachts. Here in Vancouver there is a worthy project for young blood with a dream. It's doable and if I were to do it again this would be more vessel than I could ever hope for. 60' gaff cutter .All teak, Sailable. Gardner, needs a haul out, decks recaulked and a bunch of varnish .interior clean and oh so classic . Owner had a dream but cancer got in the way.She's at the Maritime Museum docks and worth a look even if you're just a dreamer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
This ad seems to indicate Lullworth went up for sale 2 years after the restoration in 2006. Price about 15,000,000 Euro- seem to be a bargain, that restoration must have cost tens of millions I would have thought.

Lulworth Yacht for Sale | LUXUO Luxury Blog

World renowned luxury yacht agents Fraser Yachts recently added the wonderful 46m (151′) S/Y Lulworth for sale. Built in 1920 but wonderfully restored in 2006 to her former glory, S/Y Lulworth is available for sale with an asking price of Euro 14,950,000 through Richard Earp of Fraser Yachts, Monaco.
 

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This ad seems to indicate Lullworth went up for sale 2 years after the restoration in 2006. Price about 15,000,000 Euro- seem to be a bargain, that restoration must have cost tens of millions I would have thought.
There are many reasons people spend countless $$$ restoring classic yachts, but making a profit out of the exercise it is not* generally one of them. In fact, most people find it very difficult to understand that - until they actually sail on one. And Lulworth is certainly a yacht worth spending money on.

* = although this is the general rule, there are exceptions if you follow the fashion trends. For example: It's trendy in Europe at the moment amongst the rich and famous to race pedigree 6- and 8-metre class yachts, so if you just happened to come across an old Fife 8-metre languishing on it's moorings in some backwater somewhere and could get it for next to nothing, clean it up and ship it to Europe, you could make a very tidy sum indeed.

Be that as it may, no matter what form of sailing you may be in to IMHO you haven't actually sailed at all until you've held the tiller of a gentleman's racer circa 1900 on a sunny day with a stiff breeze... :cool: :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
There are many reasons people spend countless $$$ restoring classic yachts, but making a profit out of the exercise it is not* generally one of them. In fact, most people find it very difficult to understand that - until they actually sail on one. And Lulworth is certainly a yacht worth spending money on.
I was not refering to making a profit, or even breaking even, or even not losing "too" much on the sale. I was just surprised that the couple spent somthing like 6 years from original purchase to finally sailing the yacht, and then to sell it after only two years.
 

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I was not refering to making a profit, or even breaking even, or even not losing "too" much on the sale. I was just surprised that the couple spent somthing like 6 years from original purchase to finally sailing the yacht, and then to sell it after only two years.
It's very sad but, maybe, having spent so much time and money fixing it up, they couldn't afford to maintain it... in the condition expected by both themselves and the general public.

By example: The key classic gentleman's racer in these parts, the lovely 1895 Fife SAYONARA, has a paid part-time "manager" who spends at least a day a week looking after the boat.
 

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I suspect that owner can afford the upkeep. Note that he still had his first classic yacht which seemed a much more practical boat to own. After you have taken Lulworth in all of the glamour regattas a few times what do you do with her. It could easily be that the satisfaction of owning this boat is not nearly as great as that that came from doing the restoration.

To clarify, I can neither confirm nor deny rumours that suggest that I am currently in negotiations to purchase Lulworth.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
This ad (Note it is 4 years old) indicates the 2006 renovation cost $15mill, I would have thought it would have cost a lot more, especially considering all the dry docking and yacht shipping/moving required:
Lulworth Yacht for Sale - White Brothers Luxury Sail Yacht

Lulworth Yacht for SaleYachtBusiness | November 26, 2010 8:33 pm

"If you've got the money you can get a beautiful new white and shiny yacht, or you can step back into the past with a sailing yacht like Lulworth. We first saw Lulworth in 2006 after her major refit but the yacht was built in 1920. The yacht was put back in the water after 70 years and a 15 million euro renovation. The 152-foot teak beauty is listed at 19.5 million euros?"

And this ad indicates she just went on the market for a bargin price:

Camper & Nicholsons signs classic sailing superyacht Lulworth for sale

"Camper & Nicholsons signs classic sailing superyacht Lulworth for sale
4 June 2014 by Malcolm MacLean
News in overnight from Camper & Nicholsons that Mark Hilpern has signed the 46.3m classic sailing yacht Lulworth for sale.

Classic sailing superyacht Lulworth is for sale
Lulworth was built in 1920 using mahogany planking on steel frames by UK yard White Brothers to a design by Herbert White and was rebuilt in 2006. Accommodation is for eight guests in four cabins. The master cabin is spacious with a double bed on the starboard side and a single on the port side with ample natural light and fresh air from the large skylight above. At the same level on the starboard side of the yacht is a spacious single cabin, which has direct access to a double and directly opposite on the port side is an almost identical double cabin.

The main saloon is a large space with a beautiful skylight above, a couch on the port side and the main dining table to starboard. Throughout this deck natural light and air are abundant coming through the many skylights. Immediately forward of the saloon is the galley, easily accessible and with good access to the main deck through the crew quarters, which are situated at the bow of the boat.

Available to view in Italy, Lulworth is asking €10.8 million."

Here is yacht world ad:
http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1920/White-Brothers-46m-Gaff-Cutter-2669034/Italy
 

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I can't even imagine such an undertaking... For me, I take grim pleasure in doing things myself, but at the same time it would be nice to have a bottomless bank account and have a team of dozens of skilled workers to do many of the monotonous tasks involved with such a massive project. Then I could swoop in and do one plank, and pay one seam without getting bored.
 
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