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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Are there books or something to study to pass the neede test? I'd like to get my captain's license without dropping $400 for the course and don't mind doing the work to learn the material.

(Didn't see a similar thread when I did a search.)
 

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I used "Get Your Captain's License: The Complete Study Guide, Second Edition" by Charlie Wing.
I sat for the 100 ton Masters Near Coastal with a Sailing Endorsement and passed with flying colors. The book also came with a CD that had practice tests on it.
Hope this helps.
 

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Have Sway take the test for you. On the written portion - the responses will be so long and meandering and have such arcane language there's no way they'll read it.

Hey - have you tried out the Gale Sail yet, Bene? I saw your post about the mast climb - sweet!

Also, we did the heave-to/COB practice this weekend with the whole family aboard. Man, it's amazing how stable things get when you heave-to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Have Sway take the test for you. On the written portion - the responses will be so long and meandering and have such arcane language there's no way they'll read it.

Hey - have you tried out the Gale Sail yet, Bene? I saw your post about the mast climb - sweet!

Also, we did the heave-to/COB practice this weekend with the whole family aboard. Man, it's amazing how stable things get when you heave-to.
Yes, the mast climb was sweet. Haven't tried the Gale Sail yet, not even in light conditions, which I should try first.

We should have tried the heave-to in the SCA we did. We had 2 people heav-ing. Next time I'll use that as a reminder to heave-to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I used "Get Your Captain's License: The Complete Study Guide, Second Edition" by Charlie Wing.
I sat for the 100 ton Masters Near Coastal with a Sailing Endorsement and passed with flying colors. The book also came with a CD that had practice tests on it.
Hope this helps.
Thanks SC, that's a big help.

Regards
 

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Yamsailor
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Hi all,

Here is my two cents. Now I want to say I am an instructor at an approved school so take my comments with a grain of salt.

In my opinion, if you have a very good understanding of coastal navigation and the 72 Colregs, then these study guides are very useful. In my opinion 50% of the learning on how to take the test is understanding the language of the test questions--which are really designed to trip you up. If someone has taken the ASA 105 Coastal Navigation course and passed it with greater than 90% then the piloting and navigation portions of the test should be a relative "breeze"--pun intended. However, and this is a "BIG" however, if you are not extremely proficient in Coastal Navigation, (especially current/set/drift/course to steer, & three position fix and the cocked-hat triangle) and/or the accuracy of your plots are greater than 0.2 NM, then I would suggest taking a brick-and-mortar course. Additionally, if you are not extremely versed in the Colregs---take a course. One must get a 90% on the Rules of the Road exam--and it is not easy. Additionally, and a lot of people don't appreciate this point, there is a huge amount of responsibility once you get the license. Just to get an idea as to how complicated things can get legally when you have a "ticket", I recommend reading "Farewells Rules of the Nautical Road", by Craig H. Allen.

I encourage people to read this book because often people want to get the title of "Captain" without really understanding the legal responsibility and ramifications of the title. That being said, I have been a Licensed Master with a Sailing and Commercial Assistance Towing endorsement for almost 5 years and it has been the most rewarding professional experience of my life (albeit I only do it part-time because I have a "career" job)

Again--I am not trying to bias a persons view one way or another; I just feel it is important to understand what one is getting into when they get their ticket. I wrote an article a couple of years ago about a portion of the Colregs:

CoastalBoating.net, Risk of collision for the recreational boater, Captain Andrew Seligman, Colregs, collisions at sea, international regulations,


Good Luck!!!
 

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However, and this is a "BIG" however, if you are not extremely proficient in Coastal Navigation, (especially current/set/drift/course to steer) and/or the accuracy of your plots are greater than 0.2 NM, then I would suggest taking a brick-and-mortar course. Additionally, if you are not extremely versed in the Colregs---take a course.
Yansailor is right on the money on this point. You really have to be honest with yourself about your plotting skills before sitting for the exam. I was pretty confident with my ability to plot, but that did not stop me from buying the practice charts available at any well stocked chart store. I think I went to "Blue Water Books and Charts" in Ft Lauderdale. God I love that store!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Some more information. My motivation is to be able to take people for charter, specifically sunset cruises, to help defray the costs of owning a large boat. I'd need to do the budgeting for insurance and other costs to see if the 12 summer weekends would be worth it. (I'd have to get my liferaft inspected, I'd think.) Making some money would be the ideal.

Knowing more about the rules sounds like a good thing. Better to prevent an accident than to remain more ignorant, mulling over the responsibilities and who gets to point the finger at whom. So that part doesn't bother me that much, unless the setup defies all logic and common sense. And I haven't heard that it's THAT bad. (Is it?)

I've good a bunch of navigation training from flying (private pilot, instrument rated) so accounting for current at different places and times along the route has got to be like accounting for wind drift at different places and times along the route.

I'd love to have the wisdom that comes from an instructor-led course. Are there other ways of gaining this wisdom?

By the way, I bought the book suggested. It was available online for an really good price (third edition, used, CD case still sealed).

Thanks for all the help. Much appreciated!
 

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Yamsailor
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[I'd love to have the wisdom that comes from an instructor-led course. Are there other ways of gaining this wisdom?]

In my opinion, the best way to get the wisdom from an instructor-led course is by taking an instructor-led course. Remember--this is a professional license.

Would you want you commercial pilot to only have practice on a flight simulator or your heart surgeon to practice only on deceased people?

:)


In short--do what you think is best for yourself--I am sure it will be the right decision as long as you are honest with yourself about your abilities.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
[I'd love to have the wisdom that comes from an instructor-led course. Are there other ways of gaining this wisdom?]

In my opinion, the best way to get the wisdom from an instructor-led course is by taking an instructor-led course. Remember--this is a professional license.

Would you want you commercial pilot to only have practice on a flight simulator or your heart surgeon to practice only on deceased people?

:)


In short--do what you think is best for yourself--I am sure it will be the right decision as long as you are honest with yourself about your abilities.
You make a good point. I've been to courses where they were simply teaching to the test. It sounds like there's more to it. Do you have any recommendation for a course on Long Island or in NY city?

I'm thinking that all this takes time and that I should aim for next summer. Or do you think it's possible to complete before the saeson is over?
 

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Insurance cost

can make things interesting in daysailing your boat.
I'd check with your company and ask about the cost of coverage for an occassional daysail for charter. could be eyeopening
best,
joe
 

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There were students in my class when I did my exams with a sea school that had their tuition and other expenses [there are many] covered by Worksource. It is an agency that helps those changing careers to pay for the cost of education . I wish I had known about them,would have saved me some money.
 

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Yamsailor
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can make things interesting in daysailing your boat.
I'd check with your company and ask about the cost of coverage for an occassional daysail for charter. could be eyeopening
best,
joe
Actually, if you are not going to use the license professionally, in most cases having the license actually lowers your recreational boat insurance premiums. On the other hand, if you use the license professionally on your own boat, the insurance premiums do increase. Yes, you can use your boat professionally with out getting the business rate insurance but if you get in an accident--they will not cover you. If you are going to do Captained charters, I think you need insurance above and beyond your recreational policy. Of course that could be off set by the hobby-expense deductions for boat and the operation and expenses--I think.

Sailing instructors usually have 3rd party liability insurance, so they can use their own boat for teaching and have their liability covered but their hull insurance is not covered. I think ASA has a program where their sailing instructors can get special additional hull and liability insurance rates added to their existing recreational insurance policy; of course you would need to be a sailing instructor.

In my opinion, it is always better to get the license--it gives you options.
 

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Of course that could be off set by the hobby-expense deductions for boat and the operation and expenses--I think.
I was actually going to post the same thing before reading your post. If the OP is going to be charging for outings then he is going to get a TON of help offsetting his boating costs by way of tax deductions. Even the actual cost of any licensing course would be deductible.

Any money spent on safety equipment, boat maintenance costs, slip fees, etc. - Once you report the income from charters, all of that is now considered expenses toward making that income and, as such, are tax deductions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks, I didn't even think of the tax deduction thing. That will really make a difference.

Regards
 

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i don't believe anyone mentioned the jones act ! if your boat is not built in the USA you cannot take passengers for hire unless you stop at a foreign port & then come back to the USA. you can get in big trouble with the USCG if you don't follow the rules. your documentation also has to be changed to commercial.
 

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i don't believe anyone mentioned the jones act ! if your boat is not built in the USA you cannot take passengers for hire unless you stop at a foreign port & then come back to the USA. you can get in big trouble with the USCG if you don't follow the rules. your documentation also has to be changed to commercial.
I'm pretty sure that a person can get a waiver from the Coast Guard which would allow a foreign built boat to be chartered in the U.S.
 

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Swab
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I've good a bunch of navigation training from flying (private pilot, instrument rated) so accounting for current at different places and times along the route has got to be like accounting for wind drift at different places and times along the route.
A lot of cross-over principles and between aviation and sailing. I found the navigation portion of my private pilot exams were a piece of cake using skills honed on the water. Works both ways.
 
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