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DJ, if you can find out any of the clients from past charters, some of them might have ideas as to who would be interested in buying the boats.

If there is no one maintaining them, you might want to look into that as well, with someone at the marina or in the town. Boats that are left alone tend to have problems and devalue very quickly, no matter where they are.

I'd also suggest looking for the closest major port, wherever that may be, and trying to contact boat brokers there.
 

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DJ, do take plenty of good photos of the boats, inside and out. But first, make sure they are cleaned up. Assuming you will use the photos to sell the boat, boats do sell for more when the photos show an uncluttered, cleaned up boat. Usually the best way to do that is to secure any valuables, then just hire help to clean & scrub for the day.

If you can go over with the crew, find out what is "special" about the boats. Ask the builder the same question, what was custom contracted for them. You may find that the "custom" part consists solely of a heavier hull or bow construction, for working near ice. Or extra insulation, which can be useful anywhere in the world, and a heating system, again, useful in many places. Depending on how much of what is "custom" the boat may have a better market value elsewhere. Also, if the boat is Chilean flagged (titled) there may be paperwork issues and some buyer reluctance in other nations. The papers which should be secure on the boat someplace will tell you that, among other things.

If you were to bring it north to sell, obviously the voyage up to either California or Florida is a long one. Between the price of flying a US crew down, or sending a Chilean (etc) crew home, and daily rates for the travel, it wouldn't be cheap to bring the boat up.

You might also want to consider which US coast (I'd suspect the Miami market is larger) and contact a big-name broker stateside to ask if they'd be interested in the brokerage sale. They might be capable, and willing, to assist in the delivery home as part and parcel of the deal, which could save you from having to pay out the delivery expenses up front as well. Or, at least to refer you to someone.
 

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No reason to round the Cape. Even if they wanted to go "east" to Florida, it would be way shorter to sail up the west side, the Chilean side they are already on, and cut through the Panama Canal. Probably something like 5000nm to Miami, versus 7500 if they took the "shorter" route around the eastern bulge of Brazil.

DJ, maybe you could find a business broker, either here or there, who could sell the existing business, not just the boats?
 

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Considering that a delivery to Florida, via Chile and the Panama Canal, would be about 5000 nm and given any port time for gear problems, or delays for weather, and a delay waiting for the Canal...that's about 50 days at 100nm per day of "direct" progress. If the larger boat does well and 150nm per day, still more than a month. And although insurers might only require a crew of 3, four is more practical. Conventional delivery back to the US wouldn't be cheap no matter how it was done. Although I'm sure any number of us would be glad to bring the boat back for the cost of the airfare down and whatever prep the boat needed. Via Hawaii, Easter Island, the Galapagos, and a few other detours en route. (VBG)
 

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Lighten up, 44. I think the OP and everyone else knows that was tongue in cheek, and yes, a couple or six months and thousands more miles of detour might be the price for a "free" delivery crew.

Hell, the OP might even be interested in doing that. You never know.

On fair wages...the debate in the US is that minimum wage should be $10.10 now, and that's for a 40-hour week before overtime. I suppose a captain is "management" and exempt from overtime, unlike the crew at McBurger. Still, that should put the least experienced Captain at $240+ perdiem and the crew at $120 per day, gee, plus an awful lot of overtime. Let's see, 12 hours, seven days, 44 hours at $10.10 ($404) plus 40 more at time and a half $15.15 ($606) So let's call it $1010 per crew per week just paying them the same base rate as a floor sweeper or cashier. Damn, that means you're going to have to pay the captain at least $1200 or he's going to protest as well. Add some food...and you can figure five grand a week for that professional crew, right?

Sure, highly paid professionals. I'm all for it. You'd better give yourself a raise though, because what you're asking for is less than the guys at McD's will get paid, and they don't have to supply their own foulies.
 

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44, I've got no bone to pick with you and if you feel picked upon...did I mention, lighten up?

You missed the point about cheap labor and then you endorse "professional" delivery. Well, professional delivery is still cheap labor, one way or another, if you can afford it at those rates. Find a plumber, an accountant, a "professional" of some type (as defined by the IRS or state rules for professional licensing) who'll work an 80-hour week for the same wages as delivery captains. If you really want a PROFESSIONAL, I'm suggesting you might not be able to find or afford one, that's all. Seaman were never considered "professional" even if they were full time mariners. Even oil platform grease monkeys get paid far better, two weeks on, two weeks off.
Money, wages, prices, are in many ways the least part of getting a safe two month long delivery.
And did I mention, lighten up? (G)
 

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If you've never read or seen the old New Yorker cartoon, let me remind you:
"We're all dogs on the internet."

If you feel the need to vet real identities, I'd suggest you open a new forum of your own, because that is not the standard on most web forums, including this one. You could always ask the owners, via the moderators, to start conducting ID verifications, but I think you'd have better luck starting your own "verified" forum.

The OP, like all forum members, determines their own threshold for credibility. You want credibility? Hire someone, buy a consultation. The advice you get in the internet is widely known to be worth about what you've paid for it.
 
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