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Hello,
I am new to sailing and also new to this bbs.Can some one give me info on adding an "Inner Mast Stay".Several webpages I visit recommened or have added this support system in case the "Forestay" gives up.I spend hours on the net trying to learn all I can about sailing.Hope to oneday (soon) head out on my own boat and see the world,this mast bracing technique may help to reduce this growing fear I have of "dismasting" and the storiesd I read of this .
Thanks for any input,
JerryO
 

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Jerry, one good source of info on adding a stay is Spar Talk, the forum that has been running on www.briontoss.com. I think they have a thread archived on this topic, and also you can pose questions.

Adding a useable staysail stay is a challenging task & a major investment in the boat if done well; it''s not "just adding a stay". Before you get there, be sure you''ve invested sufficient time & $$ on the existing rig (from inspecting the chainplates on up) - that''s a great way to increase your peace of mind.

Jack
 

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Jerry,
Adding a stays''l stay requires:
a mast attachment point
a deck attachment with a good backing plate
associated hardware
If you are trying to stabilize your mast, ie, keep it from "pumping" in a seaway, a jackstay may be all you need. Placement of the jack stay can be much furthur aft than if it is used to carry sail. It may be simpler/cheaper to just upgrade all of your rigging to the next larger size, make sure all of the hardware is in good shape, and reef early. Any rigging placed fwd of the mast and aft of the forestay has a real tendency to get in the way.
Tom S.
 
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It is not a simple task to add a babystay. A jibstay is even a bit worse, Beyond that, a babystay frankly won''t keep your mast up in most dismasting situations and besides a babystay makes it much harder to tack as you have to drag the sail over the stay on each tack. Typically, when a forestay breaks the forward lower shrouds and luff wire in jib are usually enough to keep your mast up until you can rig the spinacker or spare jib halyard as a temporary forestay. In my experience you typically loose a mast when an upper or lower shroud fails.

To add a babystaym you need to glass a sting back and transverse frame to the centerline of the boat in the interior of the hull in a direct line with the stay.

At the deck you will need to through bolt a heavy duty eye above and below the deck. These eyes will need to be in the line of the Babystay. To install the eyes, you need to predrill the bolt holes through the top skin of the deck only being careful not to pierce the bottom skin of the deck. Then you need to chew up the core in that area. The standard method for doing that is to take an allen wrench and cut the short leg about 3/8" long and chuck it in a drill. Then stick in into the core of the deck and let it spin until the core has been chewed up. Then vacuum the chewed up coring out using a shopvac. Once the hole is cleaned out, mask the hole, mix up a little epoxy and partially fill the hole to wet out the core in the area and then fill the hole level with the deck with epoxy thickened to the consistancy of peanut butter. When the epoxy has set redrill the holes this time all the way through the deck.

Tape off the foot print of the two eyes (one above and ond below) and then apply caulk to the upper pad eye and thru bolt through the deck and the eyes above and below the deck.

Once the caulk has set, below deck, run a short length of rod rigging with its own turnbuckle from the new strongback/transverse frame to the pad eye below the deck and tension it lightly.

Depending on the size of the boat and the constuction of the mast, either bolt on a ''Y'' tang at the correct position on the mast or have a tang welded on. Finally run your new babystay from the tang on the mast to the pad eye and tension it and the rod below the deck at the same time.

You will probably want to add a shroud roller to reduce the tendancy for the jib to hang up but it still will. Of course if you are adding a babystay and planning to really load it up then you should probably add running backstays as well to offset the forward loading at an unopposed panel point.

Now then, Just out of curiousity what kind of boat are you thinking of doing this to?

In my book adding a Babystay makes virtually no sense on a boat under about 40 feet and even then it is questionable.

Good luck
Jeff
 

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Jeff, great advice! You seem to know what you are doing.
I would think that if dismasting is the concern, adding an additional backstay for redundency, makes more sense.
Tom S.
 
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Again, in my experience, backstays (like forestays) are rarely the reason for a dismasting. If a backstay parts you can generally keep the mast up by tightening the mainsheet. Either the sail or the topping lift will keep the mast up until something more permanent can be rigged. The aft lower shrouds also help keep a mast up if a backstay fails. Masts are generally lost when a shroud fails. On boats with fore and aft lower shrouds it is generally an upper shroud failure that causes the loss of a rig. In recent years there have also been reports of rigs lost in roll overs in ocean storm conditions. There is not much that can be done about that.

Randomly adding new shrouds can add a lot of weight aloft. Weight that most boats are not designed to carry. This weight carried high as shrouds and stays are carried can dramaticaly reduce stability and increase the amount that a boat rolls.

Jeff
 
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