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Discussion Starter #1
I've got an Admiral 38 Cat and I want to install an electric winch for the main halyard. What thoughts do you have as to make and size of winch and where would you locate such a device.

Thanks
Al
 

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The forces on the main halyard would be much less than say on the winches. If it is heavy I wonder if batt cars or the cheaper version would lower any friction sufficiently
 

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Why would you want to do that when there are a lot of other ways to raise the mainsail that are far less expensive and more reliable.

For instance, adding a block to the top of the mainsail headboard and turning the main halyard into a two-part purchase, while requiring a longer main halyard, is a simple and very effective way to increase leverage.

Adding a line clutch to the mast above the winch would allow you to jump the halyard more effectively, and in many cases eliminate the need for an electric winch.
 

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While a two part halyard is a good suggestion, another alternative is to purchase a battery powered Milwaukee Right Angle Drill (See MILWAUKEE 0721-21 V28 Li-Ion 1/2" Right Angle Drill Kit - Toolup.com ) and whinch bit (See HOME ) for less than 25% of the cost of an electric winch drive (or 10% of the cost of an entirely new winch) and make all of your existing winches "electric". We've been using this arrangement since early 2005 and it has proven very satisfactory on our 42' Beneteau. Even my 5' tall 100# wife can hoist the sails, trim and furl the Genny.

FWIW...

s/v HyLyte
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Electric winches

Thanks for all the advice. I really like the sound (and cost) of the electric drill option. No installation, multiple uses and as I said realtively cheap.

Al
 

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Just in case you decide to reconsider on electric winches, I strongly urge you to consider the new Andersen electrics. The motor is right in the winch. The winch sits higher, but you don't have to deal with the motor below the deck. It's a huge advantage for the installation.
 

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I'd also point out that the Andersens are probably the most durable and well-built winches made currently—and priced accordingly.
Just in case you decide to reconsider on electric winches, I strongly urge you to consider the new Andersen electrics. The motor is right in the winch. The winch sits higher, but you don't have to deal with the motor below the deck. It's a huge advantage for the installation.
 

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I'd also point out that the Andersens are probably the most durable and well-built winches made currently—and priced accordingly.
They really are great. We installed them on our Bayfield years ago and I just loved them. I half hope our new winches on the Bene go bad so that I have an excuse to install Andersens. Not really of course, but if for whatever reason I need to buy a new winch, it WILL be an Andersen.
 

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I use the Milwaukee right angle drill (battery powered) and winch bit. It has been great and much less expense than powering the winch. Also less modification to the boat to get the motor and electric power to the winch. I figure I could drop 4 or 5 of these overboard before I get close the the cost of powering a single winch on my boat.
 

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Always nice to discover new boat toys in these forums. The winch bit just might top them all - thanks for the link, and I'll definitely be adding one to my wishlist!

Is it difficult to hold the drill in the place while tightening a sheet, though? I don't understand how the right angle drill doesn't torque the whole unit around.
 

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The Milwaukee Drill will generate up to about 600 in lbs of torque before it stalls out. For its size, that's about a 30 lb load on the hand grip. In second gear (reverse on the drill) a Lewmar 43 has a power ration of 43:1. On our boat our primaries are 54's (54:1). My 105# 5' tall wife can trim our genny with the Drill in up to about 20 knot's apparent. Note, however, that the drill is not light and, for a small person, needs two hands to maneuver untill the bit's in place.

FWIW...

s/v HyLyte
 
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