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Did you put an oily rag in the intake and exhaust and keep them wet? I assume you live where it's moist?
 

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All wearables need to be replaced: hoses, belts, impeller, filters, fluids, etc. I'd pull the injectors, spray a small amount of fogging oil in each cylinder and turn the motor over by hand to try to pre-lube as best I could. Not to mention, just insure the motor turns over, before putting the starter motor to it. Injectors don't like to sit dry that long, so having them pop tested wouldn't be a bad idea. You can always see how she runs first.

If it's an unused motor, be sure to understand the break-in procedure. This typically requires heavy load and heavy but variable throttle for specified periods to wear in the rings and avoid varnishing the cylinder walls. Most sailboats motor in and out of the harbor at loads far below those necessary to properly break in an engine. Get out there and use it for hours at first.
 

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First, I'd pull the injectors and see if the engine turns over. The rings may be rusted to the cylinder walls or liners. The head should probably go to a shop to have the valve guides renewed, the valves seated and the injectors would do well with a rebuild.
If the engine is frozen, then you'll want to drain the oil and fill the sump and pistons with diesel and let it sit a week or two, taking a breaker bar and gently putting pressure through the crank shaft bolt, hoping to break it free. If this works you can determine the damage to the cylinder walls (or liners) and decide if the block needs to go out to repair this.
With any luck, none of this will be necessary, but not skipping any steps to make sure your 'new' engine is as new when you install it will save you big time down the road.
 

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Check that the motor is turning, and you will be OK.
Seriously, there is no need to change hoses or impellers or belts unless they have failed.
Check for oil in the sump, of course, and in gearbox.
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On the general point of motor storage, every few months turn the flywheel a little to avoid the motor becoming "frozen". If it's a Beta, use the nut on the front of the motor crankshaft. Turn it gently.
Believe me, an unused engine can freeze solid with corrosion if you leave them long enough.
 

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Rockter;2051630968.....there is no need to change hoses or impellers or belts unless they have failed........[/QUOTE said:
The shelf life of hoses and belts is about a half dozen years. Why would you recommend risking, or worse waiting for a failure to replace? Throw a belt or burst a hose and one could easily overheat the engine. These are wearables and time is wear.

If there has been an impeller sitting in the water pump for ten years, one risks ingesting a vane upon failure. One would hope a stored engine, didn't even have the impeller installed.

I would, however, try to turn the motor over by hand first, to see what I was dealing with.
 

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If it works, leave it alone.
The alternator belt on my boat is well beyond its 10th year, the impeller 25 years, the engine hoses 30+ years.
If they look or sound distressed, they get replaced, not before.
There is no way on this earth I would change the belts, impeller, or hoses on a motor that had never been used.
Run it first, see how they perform, see how they look, then decide.
Not before.
 

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...The alternator belt on my boat is well beyond its 10th year, the impeller 25 years, the engine hoses 30+ years......
My grandmother smoked every day and died at the age of 94, from natural causes. That doesn't make smoking a recommended practice.

I implore the OP to do their own research and see what the proper advice is. A 25 year old impeller is as edge case as I've ever heard.

Hose and belts typically last longer than their shelf life. The question is whether you want to determine their durability underway, or follow best practices and avoid being stranded or causing collateral damage.
 

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Catalina 400 MKII
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If it works, leave it alone.
The alternator belt on my boat is well beyond its 10th year, the impeller 25 years, the engine hoses 30+ years.
If they look or sound distressed, they get replaced, not before.
There is no way on this earth I would change the belts, impeller, or hoses on a motor that had never been used.
Run it first, see how they perform, see how they look, then decide.
Not before.

You might want to re-think this one. Parts wear out, but they also degrade with age. An engine hose at 30 years? Unless you are really careful in checking them, you might be headed for a failure. A failure, by the way, could cost a lot of money, or happen at a time when the boat could be placed in jeopardy. But, if you're really on top of checking them.... An impeller, however, cannot be checked unless you take it out - at which point you might as well just replace it. An impeller that fails can overheat an engine really fast.

I'll illustrate my point with two stories:

A friend at the harbor is a really good sailor. Nice boat too. He came back in after a daysail with his mast broken in two. Turns out that the turnbuckle failed. Older boat, hardware older than the replacement schedule. I saw the turnbuckle. Where it failed, it was rusty along the failure surface. In other words, the failure was a long time coming. Not an engine failure, but a failure that could have killed someone if luck had gone against him.

Second story. Friend's boat, different friend, engine stopped. I towed him in. He cleaned all the filters and went to his boatf the next week, but the engine wouldn't start. Turns out that a bunch of crud had blocked the intake tube inside his diesel tank.

My point is that you don't have to go crazy, but you do need to maintain your boat systems. At least replace that impeller. In my experience, it pays off to do filters, belts, fluids, clean it and look for anthing else that you can do. A stitch in time saves nine.

Just my opinion, and how I run my boat. Your boat, your choice.
 

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25 years on an impeller. Not sure I understand the logic of risking a $10 part replacement vs having the fish the vanes out of the heat exchanger.
 

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Master Mariner
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If it works, leave it alone.
The alternator belt on my boat is well beyond its 10th year, the impeller 25 years, the engine hoses 30+ years.
If they look or sound distressed, they get replaced, not before.
There is no way on this earth I would change the belts, impeller, or hoses on a motor that had never been used.
Run it first, see how they perform, see how they look, then decide.
Not before.
You are bragging about not changing your impeller in 25 years?
I wouldn't leave the dock with you on that boat if it was sailing after Noah's arc had sailed and it was my only hope!
 
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Maybe he should replace this one as well, eh? A Kubota will have something in there similar, won't it?...

Volvo Penta GUMMIKUPPLUNG - Ersatzteilnummer 827615 - Schmidt & Seifert

After all, it might fail one day unexpectedly.

And it's only $360 bucks.

Then there is the gearbox final drive seal, and the crankshaft forward seal, and the crankshaft aft seal, and the valve guide oil seals.
They have all got to be changed too, don't they?
After all, they are 10 years old and might fail, mightn't they?
And when he is digging in there trying to get them out there is no telling what else he might find or break on the way in. I mean the engine is Japanese, and nearly all those fasteners will have been impact-driven at the factory, and man they are hard to shift sometimes, eh?
Imagination knows no bounds (nor expense).
The mind boggles !
 

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You are bragging about not changing your impeller in 25 years?
I wouldn't leave the dock with you on that boat if it was sailing after Noah's arc had sailed and it was my only hope!
Capta :

I am not bragging about anything and i wouldn't let you on my boat as i could not stand the constant critique (and expense) of trying to keep you happy. After all, nothing must be older than 10 years as it might fail, even the whole boat.

The impeller pumps and pumps strongly.
When it doesn't I will change it... there are two impeller spares on board, and a spare pump, and two starters, and a spare gearbox, and a spare alternator.

As for seaworthyness and the Arc and all that, well my boat took me across the North Atlantic, you know (?) through the usual gales and so on, and it still floats, and i changed the coolant impeller 25 years ago.
How far has yours sailed without stopping for spare parts? Six times round the world no-doubt?
 

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Capta :

I am not bragging about anything and i wouldn't let you on my boat as i could not stand the constant critique (and expense) of trying to keep you happy. After all, nothing must be older than 10 years as it might fail, even the whole boat.

The impeller pumps and pumps strongly.
When it doesn't I will change it... there are two impeller spares on board, and a spare pump, and two starters, and a spare gearbox, and a spare alternator.

As for seaworthyness and the Arc and all that, well my boat took me across the North Atlantic, you know (?) through the usual gales and so on, and it still floats, and i changed the coolant impeller 25 years ago.
How far has yours sailed without stopping for spare parts? Six times round the world no-doubt?
Rock,

We got your point.

There is nothing wrong with you following your own philosophy.

Just like there is nothing wrong with me following a preventative approach. Many have a PM approach to items which wear out on their boat.
 

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Catalina 400 MKII
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So I looked up the manufacturer's recommendation for replacing the impeller on my Yanmar 3JHAE. It says every 4 years or 1000 hours. That sounds appropriate.
 

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Yes, what works for you, certainly, follow it.
But would you change all the hoses, the impeller, and all the seals on an engine that has never been used?
Remember that if anyone claims that the hoses are degraded, then all the seals will be too.
Would you change out all the engine seals - all of them - as some sort of PM campaign on an engine that has never been used?
Have you ever tried removing the crankshaft seals to see how much work that is? And when you put it together again, does anyone claim that they can do a better job than the assembly line?
These engines DETEST being disturbed like that.
Wait until the first oil drips start - where previously there were none - then get back to us with this all-encompassing "PM" approach.
To me, that is beyond comprehension - just, like, out of it, somewhere.
Start it, run it, heat it up, bollard test it, wobble the hoses, get out the magnifying glass, and make your decisions, but to throw usable hoses and impellers and seals in the bin every five years and to dig out all of the engine seals starting with an engine that has never been used????
Really????
 
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