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I think that most people on this board will hate it, but in my searches I haven't seen any discussion on the "SailJet" on this forum.

Sailjet

It's a hybrid with a 300hp inboard engine and can be configured in a standard sloop design... or a pseudo-schooner design that just uses 2 genoas



I find that setup really intriguing and other than decreased pointing ability, do you think there are any other major issues?
 

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Two sails to sheet in on every tack.

I like my rig with selftacking head sail and "self tacking" traditional main.
But I also enjoy sailing at all wind directions...
 

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Without a couple of poles sailing downwind would a pain...
 
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Seems to me this is another "hybrid" that is looking to fix a problem that does not exist. The only real advantage I see of the Mac is that it can be trailered easily and the motor can make it usable in some places that you can't really sail, such as rivers and some narrow lakes. This just looks like a bigger version that will loose the ability to be easy to trailer. Will have the same suffering performance under sail, or perhaps even worse with that rig. I would take a good cat ketch rig on something like this and it might make sense as they are pretty much set it and forget it type rigs and that seems to go along with the hybrid concept. I always thought a Mac with a cat rig might make sense since they can't really be very effectively trimmed anyway and sailing performance is not very high on the agenda.

By the way this is a ketch rig, not a schooner, as if it were schooner the aft mast would have to be taller. It does not appear to be taller. But hey why stop at two masts make it a Barquentine and load her up with square sails.

That Boo'om looks interesting though. They seem to have the IKEA method of naming boats down!
 

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Barquito
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By the way this is a ketch rig, not a schooner, as if it were schooner the aft mast would have to be taller.
I think most would consider a boat with two masts of the same size as a schooner.
 

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69' Coronado 25
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Its a Finnish made boat so the sailing performance shouldn't be all that bad... BUT... the old saying is, "It can sail, it can motor, it just can't do either with top performance."
 

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By the way this is a ketch rig, not a schooner, as if it were schooner the aft mast would have to be taller.
I agree, this would be considered a staysail schooner, not a ketch. Check your definition of a schooner other places than Wiki, which is not an official or necessarily correct place to get information.
 

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Remember you're a womble
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300hp? Really? 300hp? I assume those big grey bits hanging down from the TV antennae are fly screens.
It's not a bad looking concept in terms of hull/cabin, but it doesn't look like it'll sail for crap. Why not throw a junk rig on there instead, easier to handle and might actually move on more than a beam reach.
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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Back in the 1970s, there had been a lot of experiments with this basic rig. Usually the main mast (mizzen) was further aft than on this design. In reality, based on what the design world understands about sail shape and rig design, this is a worst of all worlds rig. To begin with this rig requires the weight, and weight aloft of two masts disadvantages (harder to stay,greater cost to build and maintain, more hull structure and complexity and so on) without offering the usual split rig advantages of being able to carry a lot more sail area lower to the waterline and thereby reducing heel.

Low aspect ratio Genoas are the least efficient sails out there on all points of sail. The low efficiency in genoas occurs in two senses, drive generated relative to sail area, and heeling/side force relative to drive. Genoas are harder to depower than higher aspect sails or sails on a boom.

Since you can only efficiently furl 10-15% of the dimension from the clew to the luff (perpendicular to the luff) and you can't depower those sails very effectively you will be forced to make sail changes and carry a pretty large sail inventory, certainly larger than that of a high efficiency fractional sloop rig with non-overlapping headsails.

And then as others have said you are tacking two genoas which means two grinders at the same time. In other words an especially strenuous rig to sail, ill suited to short hand sailing.

And lastly you have the clew ans sheets whipping though the cockpit during a reef or tack, which seems like a real hazard to me.

To me this is simply a gimmicky solution to appearing to offer something different. But as demonstrated here, different does not always equate to better.

Jeff
 
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I agree, this would be considered a staysail schooner, not a ketch. Check your definition of a schooner other places than Wiki, which is not an official or necessarily correct place to get information.
Well my source was the The Annapolis Book of Seamanship: Fourth Edition. Clearly defines a Schooner as having a two (or more) masts, with a shorter foremast.

While Wikipedia is not always accurate, it is more often accurtate than not, but certainly was not my source.
 

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Dodging a single boom is safer than a flicking clew while you haul the sheets. Tacking could be interesting. The main? drives up to windward, Jib? goes across and falls away. now the main? is backed and boat continues to fall away until you've got everything sheeted on the other side . Some delay before up to speed and course. For me ,if it's not gaff rigged it just looks funny. Your opinion may defer.
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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Thte from the Annapolis Book of Sailing surprises me since the traditional definition of a schooner has always been two or more masts with the main mast (aft) mast as the taller or equal to the foremast(s).

Jeff
 

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Thte from the Annapolis Book of Sailing surprises me since the traditional definition of a schooner has always been two or more masts with the main mast (aft) mast as the taller or equal to the foremast(s).

Jeff
I think that is what I was kind of quoting (Not exact quote as I don't have the book in front of me, it is back at home. But yes main mast taller than foremast. This is the same discussion we ran into on the Freedom ketch, but people seemed to think since it was Cat rigged that is why it was a Ketch, but I think if you have masts the same height it would indicate a ketch, but in this boat I think it is just a mess! Why go to the expense of 2 masts and not get the maximum sail aria? I think the reason is this is really meant to be a power boat, with sails to impress there friends! And 2 masts must be better than 1, just like 300 horsepower is better than 30!
 

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One often overlooked advantage of two equal masts is the ability to double up the careening effort when trying to drag the sucker into deeper water after that last demonstration of tacking prowess.
 

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To the untrained eye, looking at the keel on the vessel, it must be made of the heaviest metal known to man or the ballast ratio is probably not so good?
 
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