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Discussion Starter · #3,341 ·
Sorry, I forgot that we DID look at Amels. I even went to Guatemala to look at an especially well priced one. However, overall, we found them to be over priced compared to their spartan aft cabin. We are liveaboards and the aft cabin in an Amel sucks.
Jesus, you seem to be very demanding:) This is the aft cabin on the smaller Amel:



You can see it here in 360º

visite virtuelle Amel 55

In fact the Amel 55 can come with two aft cabins or just a big one and I would say that the big one is really big.

You are talking about this boat?



Ta Chiao CT 54/56 Review: Perry Pirate Ship - Waves « Jordan Yacht Brokerage

With this Aft cabin?

Virtual Tour of a Ta Chiao CT 54 Luxury Ketch for sale in South Oban, Argyll

That is a really old design. I did not know that they were still making that boat. It is a new or recent one?

Regards

Paulo
 

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Maestro 345

I´m doing some catching up this evening, been busy with the family all christmas :laugher

I think this boat is new to the thread, the Maestro 345!















This boat designed by Kamu Stråhlmann looks really interesting. It´s light weight, it has a deep lifting keel, reasonable sail area and it´s a good size (at least for me!). I wonder how the interior design looks. Something like the Pogo´s would be nice, I think Roseo did a good job on them. Bright, modern looking and light but still comfortable and functional.

Any thoughts?!

//Mr W
 

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Re: Maestro 345

I think this boat is new to the thread, the Maestro 345!
A little more info:

It´s built out of carbon and epoxy. The keel has a lead bulb with duplex steel fin. Keel weight is 1450kg. This gives RM of 30-3780 kNm (which tells me nothing, please comment Paulo!). Mast, boom and bowsprit is Selden carbon fibre. First boat weighed in at 2680kg w/o rig. Rig weighs 135kg. It´s CE class A. Engine options are electric or diesel.

See the boat on Maestro Boats homepage.

//Mr W
 

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Jesus, you seem to be very demanding:) This is the aft cabin on the smaller Amel:



You can see it here in 360º

visite virtuelle Amel 55

In fact the Amel 55 can come with two aft cabins or just a big one and I would say that the big one is really big.

You are talking about this boat?



Ta Chiao CT 54/56 Review: Perry Pirate Ship - Waves « Jordan Yacht Brokerage

With this Aft cabin?

Virtual Tour of a Ta Chiao CT 54 Luxury Ketch for sale in South Oban, Argyll

That is a really old design. I did not know that they were still making that boat. It is a new or recent one?

Regards

Paulo
The Amels we looked at sure didn't have an aft cabin looking like that!!!

They were not NEW. Perhaps that is the difference? As it was the Amels we were looking at were approx. half a Million $s.

Sorry, we are not prepared to afford NEW prices.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3,345 ·
Vendee Globe

Now on the Atlantic the two leaders continue very close. It seemed François could go slightly faster and managed an increasing 40Nm lead over Armel but then Armel changed course and now they are laterally separated by 200Nm.

Armel reduced the difference to 12NM and a big high pressure center is just ahead. Very difficult call. It seems that at first François will have advantage but later it seems better for Armel and maybe for more time.

Anyway, big strategic play at work and maybe an error from François. He knows he can be faster so he would only need to cover Armel moves and then when he is nearer and the way is easy, just go faster for the finish line. He is taken a big risk letting Armel do his play and allowing him to have a big lateral difference. It is not by accident that Armel is called the "Jackal" and that may well finish badly to the smiling kid.

He is betting when it seems to me he had not a need to. Interesting;)

Vendée Globe 2012-2013 - Tracking

Jean-Pierre is not losing way but not winning also and remains at about 350Nm. Anyway it is amazing how he can be there. The guy went up his mast 5 times already:eek: It seems that this time he mananged to solve the problem. Cheers for him. Maybe now he can recover distance over the two leaders even if I think he would not be able to recover 350NM till the finish line.

Cinquième montée victorieuse pour Jean-Pierre Dick por VendeeGlobeTV

Day 56 highlights por VendeeGlobeTV
 

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Discussion Starter · #3,346 ·
Re: Maestro 345

A little more info:

It´s built out of carbon and epoxy. The keel has a lead bulb with duplex steel fin. Keel weight is 1450kg. This gives RM of 30-3780 kNm (which tells me nothing, please comment Paulo!). Mast, boom and bowsprit is Selden carbon fibre. First boat weighed in at 2680kg w/o rig. Rig weighs 135kg. It´s CE class A. Engine options are electric or diesel.

See the boat on Maestro Boats homepage.

//Mr W
That is very simple. That is the boat you were waiting for. Just buy it and invite me for a ride :D

I just love that boat and I find quite unexpected to find it in Maestro.

Some 7 or seven years ago I asked them some information about the then new Maestro 40. I liked what I had saw regarding the boat and asked for a stability curve and price. The one that replied to me was the NA and I exchanged some nice emails with him. The stability curve was very good and I was impressed with the boat, a bit to classic for me in the interior, also very expensive and out of budget.


Now, this is a completely different bird, a very modern boat while the other was nice but classic on the line of traditional fast Nordic performance cruisers.

I don't know how this one come up. The designer is Strahlmann yacht design. I like their designs a lot I mean I love the Finngulf yachts, but all their work is about classical very good stuff.

This is not a classical one at all. I have some doubts how the boat can be so light with the mechanism to lift the keel and such a big ballast, but then Maestro has a tradition of very well made boats and Strahlmann yacht design a tradition of designing very solid boats.

I like the beam, I like the hull, I like the transom, I like the cabin design and all the light and outside view it will provide, I like the lifting keel and positively love the B/D (48%) and the draft (2.60m). My friend that boat will not need anybody in the rails and even so it will be MASSIVELY STIFF.

It will heel considerable upwind but it will be solid as a rock and even if 76m2 of sail is a lot for a boat with 3000kg it is well possible that this one will only have to reef at 13 or 14K as most cruisers will having a race boat performance.

But you are warned, this boat has to be expensive. The secret of Pogo is that the way they make the boats, I mean regarding the design criteria, the boats will have a good performance and will not be expensive. This boat will be a lot faster than the Pogo mainly upwind (and more difficult to sail downwind but faster too) but has to be a lot more expensive. That lifting mecanism is more expensive than a swing one and that hull has to be more strong and be heavily reinforced with a grid to take all the strain that huge ballast and big draft will put on the hull.

But I love it, that's for sure. That's the more interesting boat I have seen for some time and I see a lot of boats:D

Thanks for having posted it.









Regards

Paulo
 

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...I really appreciate that you mention both the good and less good things about your boat....
Thanks, Mr. W!

I very much agree Interesting Sailboats are only interesting if we also get to know their drawbacks.
Boats that tick all the boxes are not interesting, probably because they just do not exist ;).

Kind regards,

Eric
 

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Discussion Starter · #3,348 · (Edited)
Vendee globe: Epic stories and the first winner.

The movies are very bad and cannot even be embeded but they are just amaizing:

First story:

Rescue of Philippe Poupon by Loick Peyron, two of the greatest sailors ever.


Poupon, 35, whom the French consider the fastest sailor alive....In second place on Dec. 28, Poupon was steering a wide arc around the Cape of Good Hope at 47 degrees south latitude.

The wind was 55 knots and the seas 25 feet, he recalled. He was below when he felt the boat roll to port. In an instant, he was over 120 degrees, with his keel in the air and his main and mizzen masts and sails under water.

Afraid he was trapped below, he waited for the keel to lever the boat erect. It didn't happen.

"I was terrified the boat would turn 'turtle' (upside down)," Poupon told race headquarters by radio afterward.

When he saw that the boat was stabilized but capsized, Poupon set to work to save himself and the boat.

First, he turned on two satellite emergency beacons, alerting race headquarters of trouble. Next, he donned a survival suit and pumped his water ballast tanks empty in the hope that the boat, minus the weight of the ballast, would right itself. No luck.

A South African search and rescue aircraft, alerted by race headquarters, spotted Fleury Michon 1,300 nautical miles southwest of Cape Town 23 hours after the emergency beacons were activated.

Three hours later, Loick Peyron, 29, aboard Lada Poch, in third place 130 nautical miles astern of Fleury Michon when the emergency developed, arrived. Peyron found Fleury Michon broadside to heavy seas and 25-knot wind. Poupon was nowhere in sight.

Peyron blew his boat whistle, and the startled Poupon clambered on deck to find his rescuer slowly circling his stricken craft.

Poupon floated a line to Lada Poch, which towed the bow of the capsized vessel into the wind. The two sailors waited, hoping that without the force of the wind and seas acting on its broadside length, the boat would spring back up. Again, it failed to respond.

Poupon decided to lessen the force holding his boat down by cutting away the mizzen mast. This done, the boat came up. Except for shredded sails, everything appeared to be intact, Peyron reported by radio.

Peyron rejoined the race with a 14-hour 30-minute time allowance for going to Poupon's aid. However, as soon as Peyron put a line on Fleury Michon, Poupon was disqualified. The rules allow no outside assistance.

Fleury Michon was not built as a ketch with an aft--or mizzen--mast. It was designed as a sloop with a single mast. Poupon added the mizzen to give himself a spare upon which to set sail if the other mast was lost. It now appears that the water pressure on the added mast and sail kept Fleury Michon from righting itself and forced Poupon to accept assistance.


'Roaring 40s' Claim 3 Sailboats : Yachting: Southern Ocean storms reduce field of Globe Challenge around-the-world race. - Los Angeles Times

THE MOVIES:

http://www.ina.fr/video/NA00001394290/la-legende-du-vendee-globe.fr.html

http://www.ina.fr/sport/voile/dossi...090331.CAC98001051.non.fr.html#containerVideo

http://www.ina.fr/sport/voile/dossi...0331.3796636001008.non.fr.html#containerVideo

The second one was an even more epic and desperate one, Pete Goss's Rescue of Raphael Dinelli :

In 1996 Pete's boat, the "Open 50" yacht Aqua Quorum, became the first British vessel ever to compete in the Vendee.....

By mid-December the Aqua Quorum had left Europe far behind, and was sailing through the Southern Ocean… one of the most desolate places in the world.
There are no ships there, no vapor trails overhead…nothing, for thousands of miles. It's a place justly feared by sailors, due to its unpredictable winds and violent storm systems. On Christmas Day, 1996, Pete was fighting his way through one of those storm systems about 1400 miles off Perth, Australia when he received a Mayday signal, passed on by the Marine Rescue and Control center in Australia.

One of his fellow competitors, Frenchman Raphael Dinelli, was fighting for his life. His boat had been overwhelmed by giant seas and was sinking, deep in the Southern Ocean…and the Aqua Quorum was the only boat in the area.
But, just to put that "area" into perspective: Raphael was over 160 miles away, through a howling ocean gale, with huge, freezing swells and deteriorating conditions!

Pete knew his chances of fighting his way through such a storm in time to rescue his fellow sailor were slim. But without him, Raphael's chances were zero....

He sent what he knew might be his last fax to his wife to explain what he was about to do, and turned around to attempt the rescue.
Time and again Aqua Quorum was knocked over by the seas. Goss knew he was close to the end of his own endurance...

Pete Goss: Making the right decision | The Mark of a Leader

The story told by Peter:

Each boat has, in addition to its telecommunications equipment, a special button which you press only in a life-threatening situation, and then the race organisers notify the local rescue authorities. So I simply picked up a mayday notification on the screen in my cockpit; I didn't know who was in trouble. Then a little bit later, another emergency message came in to say it was Raphael. I immediately decided to turn round and go for him. There was another competitor only four hours away, but his communications had gone down in a storm, so as far as we knew it was up to me.

Turning round was hazardous. My boat, Aqua Quorum, wasn't built to go for long against the prevailing winds. I was knocked down lots of times, the boat lay over, mast in the water, and stuff like that. But she's a good boat and we plugged away all night and the following day the wind eased. I didn't have any sense of panic, but I did wonder whether Raph- ael would be alive. It's very, very cold in that part of the world, and I knew that, effectively, his clock was ticking away.

It took two days of battling hurricane-force winds before he finally located the life-raft carrying the near-dead Dinelli, who had by that point spent 2 days in a survival suit, waiting for rescue.
Once he had managed to get Raphael on board (no easy feat in a freezing wind, poor visibility and 30-foot waves) there was no time for congratulations.

Pete got him below, into warm clothes and a bunk…and then went back on deck to keep them both alive.

For several weeks, Pete acted as nurse for Raphael, who was suffering from both exhaustion and hypothermia.

Raphael's English was even spottier than Pete's French, so at first they had a few challenges in communicating. Nevertheless, after 10 days they were firm friends, sharing conversations about everything and anything.

Dinelli, realizing now what was most important to him, used Pete's fax machine to ask his girlfriend to marry him. When she accepted, he asked Pete to be best man at his wedding.

Two weeks after the rescue Pete dropped Raphael off at Hobart, Australia, to continue on the race. They shook hands and vowed to meet for a beer.

The next time Pete saw Raphael, the Frenchman was cheering wildly as Aqua Quorumcrossed the finish line at Les Sables d'Olonne, 126 days and 21 hours after it had first pulled away from its slip. Pete Goss had become the fastest British sailor to sail single-handedly round the world.

Pete Goss: Making the right decision | The Mark of a Leader

There is a book about this story:

Rescue from Beyond the Roaring Forties: The Story of Pete Goss's Rescue of Raphael Dinelli: Amazon.co.uk: Raphael Dinelli: [email protected]@[email protected]@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/[email protected]@[email protected]@51Mjg-63cxL


Musto Stories - Pete Goss from Musto Stories on Vimeo.

and since we are looking back just let's remember the first race and the winner,Titouan Lamazou

MOVIE:

http://www.ina.fr/sport/voile/dossi...090331.CAC91033341.non.fr.html#containerVideo

and the first edition was not only won by a great sailor (that used to crew with Tabarly) but most of all with an adventurer, an artist and and writer. A truly big human being as the first winner of a great race.

He was nominated in 2003 Unesco artist for the peace after his project Zoé-Zoé, Women of the world.

Femmes du monde » Les ouvrages de Titouan Lamazou

African Great Lakes - ditions en ligne - Titouan Lamazou - ditions en ligne de Titouan Lamazou,

With the French nationality, he was born in Casablanca, Morocco.

For just one time and as a homage to Lamazou I will not post pictures of boats but some of his work. He tried to show to us all that we are all the same even with different looks and cultures, all beautiful to the eyes of good. And to the eyes of men, what way is better to show that than to picture beautiful women all around the world;)















 

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...which brings us to another reading selection for those who dream of ocean racing, Pete Goss's "Close to the Wind", which de-glamorizes solo ocean racing. After reading his book, you will realize a solo racing campaign is really about finding/obtaining corporate sponsors so you can raise the monumental amounts of capital necessary to fund your race.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3,350 · (Edited)
Vendee Globe

It is possible that the options taken now, face to this strategic play determine who is going to win this race. The options of the two leaders are so different that it would be almost miraculous that one would not come way better of this than the other.

The weather report only gives 36 hours but even looking on other one that goes till 60 hours I cannot see any way to passing to the West so I guess that soon Armel is going to turn East on a convergence route with François. It seems to me that Armel is trying to escape some head wind at the cost of a longer way.

It may just works but I don't believe it will turn in an advantage of more than 35Nm. If he really is trying a complete different scheme, well it beats the 60 hours that I have of previsions and beats me. If so it may well be already connected with the Doldrum passage but that is way too much for me.:rolleyes:

By the time being the one that is winning big time is Jean-Pierre. I was expecting him to win distance with this delicate weather pattern on the leaders but almost 100Nm? :D I guess that now that he has not to climb to the mast every other day, he should be racing with another spirit. The weather pattern is better for him so he would continue to win and I am very curious to see how much. For now he has 250Nm to recover, less 100 that he had yesterday.

Vendée Globe 2012-2013 - Tracking

Day 57 highlights por VendeeGlobeTV

Week 8 Highlights of the 2012-2013 Vendée Globe por VendeeGlobeTV
 

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Discussion Starter · #3,351 ·
Cruising Styles and different pleasures.

A beautiful movie, a beautiful boat. A voyage to Jan Mayen on a 1936 designed Jack Laurent Giles designed "Vertue Class" yacht.

In what regards cruising, even to faraway places, any boat is better than no boat and if you pick one that is not the most adequate to the job, at least pick one that has class, lots of it and do it in style;)

 

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Discussion Starter · #3,352 · (Edited)
NA Jim Young and hull/keel development

On another thread I posted this about a surprising boat for the time, the Fiery Cross, the first canting keeler.

This certainly comes as a surprise:

In his book Sensible Cruising Designs, L. Francis Herreshoff promulgated the concept of a slim, canting-keel, 45-foot cruiser as the "ultimate sailing machine." In 1957, Kiwi designer Jim Young built the boat out of kauri wood; with Herreshoff's permission, he made some slight alterations to the design. "He added a foot of beam, fortunately, expanding it from six feet to seven feet," says Gary. "It made her somewhat habitable down below."

Though Fiery Cross was New Zealand's first canting-keel raceboat, after only a couple of years the boat was given a fixed keel to comply with the racing rules of the time.


New Zealand Classic | Cruising World

On "modern" times the concept was reinvented by Pascal Conq that was the one to use it successively in racing boats, I mean canting keels as we know them today. Him and his senior partner Finot (and some other French designers) were the ones that developed a reliable system as we know it today, working on Open60, that were much the testing boats were was made all the extensive testing to make them reliable.

Canting keels : A 30 years story ! | finot-conq architectes navals

Looking at Fierry Cross system I have some doubts regarding its reliability but then at the time they do not have the technology to do better than that.

I agree that the boat is not only a breakthrough in design as it is very modern even if it escapes completely the concept of a planning boat. I am quite sure the boat is still a very good boat upwind.

It certainly deserves its place on this thread. The boat:









some more interesting information on the words of the designer, Jim Young:

In L. Frances Herreshoff's book Common Sense of Yacht Design, he advocated the system of canting the keel to windward to get the stability of a beamy boat, but in a narrow hull and without the drag of wide beam.

I thought that a great idea. It would add greatly to the sensation of sailing, great for cruising or reaching up to Kawau Island and up the northern coast. So I built her with that set-up in mind and you can see in the photograph of the hull being turned over of a hollow where the keel fin was recessed.




I knew that if you wanted speed then the boat would have to be long. And to keep costs down the hull would have to be narrow, plus having light gear with a light rig and everything else light and inexpensive. And the type of hull itself was the same as Herreschoff had advocated in his book, a double ended hull.

I had some correspondence with him because the boat he drew was the same length, 45 feet, but had only 6 foot (13.7 x 1.8 m) beam with 6.5 foot (2 m) draught. And I wanted to make this boat 7 foot (2.13 m) beam and so I wrote to him saying I was interested in his ideas but wanted to increase beam and asked him what he thought of that. He was full of enthusiasm and pleased to see someone carry out his ideas."

.
Jim Young was one of the greater NA of the XX century and if he had lived in Europe he would have been much more well known.

Forever Young 1

Young Yacht Design

It is very interesting to hear him talk about the evolution of modern boats, from Fiery Cross to his more modern and faster hull forms. Lets hear what he has to say:

Jim Young: A Contrast in Hull Forms

In this article Jim examines the transition from the first canting keel boat 'Fiery Cross' through to the modern ultra light displacement boats (ULDB).

Fiery Cross. Not only a New Zealand first but the world's first with a canting keel. Although that distinction hadn't entered my mind. It took another 50 years for the ban on it's use while racing to be relaxed. Fiery Cross was meant firstly for coastal cruising. Fast and with no vices. She never once broached although she broke more than one rudder stock. But that was another learning curve.

Started building in 1945. Launched in 1958. LOA 45ft (13.7m) LWL 41ft (13.5m) Beam 7ft 2in (2.18m) Draft 6ft 4in (1.93m) Disp 4.6 tons SA 550 sq ft (51 sq m) Accommodation 6 berths, galley and toilet. Max disp. hull speed 9 knots. Construction 18mm glued double diagonal kauri on 40 x 22mm stringers on edge. I was building her alone spare time so it was much easier to use short diagonal planking.

The hollow mild steel faired fin had a 2.2 ton lead semi bulb. It was attached to the hull by two massive steel hinges and controlled by a vertical steel tube with a bearing at the deckhead. The tube was joined to a 100mm diameter stainless steel shaft that passed down through a 100mm diameter gland. The shaft was then bent aft to the 22.5 degree Max. When heeled at 22.5 degree and the keel canted to the maximum it was at 45 degrees.

The extra speed generated meant the fin retained it's resistance to leeway even at an angle so there was no need for the additional retractable fins as they do now with keels canted by hydraulics to windward so far that they are close to horizontal when at maximum power. Just like aircraft and birds the faster you go the smaller the wings.

.....

The first YOUNG 11 was Honeywell, built by my brother Alan for Ross Field. Ross had the first Young 88 Paddy Wagon (Ross was then a cop). Roger Land saw the Young 11 as a logical step up from the Young 88 and Honeywell became the plug for the fibreglass moulds. With her beamy, dinghy type lines with flared sides Honeywell could hardly differ more from Fiery Cross.







I don't know of any boats with that hull form before 1980 but now they appear the most common hull form. In fact I wrote a piece published in Sea Spray in 1980 suggesting two designs of that hull form as ideal to exploit the spectacular weight savings with added strength in the new light weight structural system. Unidirectional glass laid over both faces of a strip planked core.

The Young 88 and then radical Rocket 31 were ideal for the new technology which offered great strength with spectacular saving in weight. It is now popularly known as Cedar Core construction. The Y88 plug was built by Greg Elliott and the Rocket 31 was built by Terry Cookson. They were the first yachts to be built using the technology....

Camp Freddie, a Rocket 31 built and sailed by Greg Peck in the UK won every regatta she entered. She was the overall winner of Class One Cowes week in the UK in 1994. In strong winds. Her slightly lower spec. sister Zapata won Class Two. Camp Freddie then went on to win the Round Isle of Wight race against 1800 starters. The only New Zealand design to make such a coupe. Yet the local yachting press didn't even notice!

The concept of the light, dinghy type, high performance keel yacht had never been seen in the Northern Hemisphere. Nor had it been seen in New Zealand before 1980. I believe it was the astounding performance of Camp Freddie (one UK yachting scribe describing her as looking like a squashed jandal) that inspired the now globally popular production sports yacht.

...
Force 11, a Young 11 helmed by Jim's grandson Aaron Young, recently won Division 2 at the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron
Sail-World.com : Jim Young: A Contrast in Hull Forms

I think Jim Young is too modest: "The concept of the light, dinghy type, high performance keel yacht had never been seen in the Northern Hemisphere. Nor had it been seen in New Zealand before 1980. .I believe it.. inspired the now globally popular production sports yacht".

Not only production sports yachts but also cruising boats. Look at this hull designed in the late 70's and compare it with modern production cruisers:



Some of the new ones are even more what he calls "dinghy type" than the rocket design. A truly great designer, one that was incredibly ahead of its time, one that brought to the modern sailboat design a huge contribution and yet a not very well known one. That's quite an injustice!!!

For the ones that have an hard time looking at drawings the real thing is much more revealing. This one that looks a brand new design is just a 25 year old design from him:


and as you can see the performance is a very good one:


It looks like a modern boat till you have a better look to the winches that are not even self tailing:D

I hope this post contributes a bit for a better knowledge of one of the great NAs ever: Jim Young.He certainly deserves that.

...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3,354 ·
Bernard Stamm

How much bad luck can a guy get?:rolleyes:

After having lost a huge amount of time on anchor having its generators fully reviewed and repaired, being racing fast and overtaking other boats, he made contact with something that just ripped off his port side hydrogenerator and put the second hydrogenerator out of order. He is going to the Horn to stop again and try to repair the only one he has now. If he can he has to give up since these boats cannot work without electric energy.

Well they can but at a such a slow pace that would not be racing anymore.

On Sunday morning, around 3.30AM (French time), Bernard Stamm informed his shore crew he had hit an unidentified floating object, which ripped off his port side hydrogenerator. Is second hydrogenerator seems to be out of order too and it is apparently impossible to recharge.

Because of previous energy-related issues, there is not enough fuel stocked on board.

Bernard therefore explained his team he was shutting down all energy-consuming devices to save the little energy he had left for the autopilot. Since then, the Cheminées Poujoulat Sailing Team has not heard from the yacht.
He was 1060 miles away from Cape Horn at 7.30AM (French time).

We are currently studying all available solutions, like finding a sheltered area where Bernard could consider getting fuel as the yacht safety is jeopardized.

Possible shelters seem to be located after the Cape Horn rounding. Weather conditions are tough with changing winds, rough sea and cold temperatures. Ice has also been detected in the area.

Here is what Bernard Stamm needs energy on board for:

- The autopilot, a capital tool when sailing solo

- Water maker (The team has no idea how much water he has left)

- Reception of weather files (the current conditions are difficult) and ice data (ice has been detected in the area)

- The central navigation computer showing wind direction and speed, boat data (speed, heading, position) and maps

- Position lights

- The AIS showing marine traffic

- The radar

- Moving the keel

- The VHF

- Communication

- The mini-lab

Régis Rassouli (Cheminées Poujoulat team communication manager) during the Web TV Live show:
We've been in touch with Bernard and last night, he told us he had to shut down everything because there is very little fuel left on board.

He was a little bit more than 1,000 miles away from the Horn when it happened. The weather is bad, there is ice in the area, it's a very tricky situation. So we're working on several possibilities to find a shelter or get additional fuel. We're checking the weather and it's stressful because we know Bernard has no way to receive weather data any more. The boat and Bernard's safety are clearly jeopardized.


...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3,355 · (Edited)
Sydney Hobart 2012 controversy

This Sydney Hobart will be remembered not by racing but mostly by controversy. on the news the controversy become bigger than the race:rolleyes:

Some pretty unusual things happened this year: One of the main contenders, Ragamuffin Loyal, clearly made a false start but wasn't penalized because the procedure for recalling the boat was not followed by the officials????? and wild thing (ex Skandia) other of the main competitors, was ruled out 3 hours before the start of the race???? allegedly because it had not deliver all paper work related with the boat safety, namely regarding a recent modification.

"'The wording here on this report says quite simply, that the information provided in the assessment undertaken, (as per) that the modification falls within the minimum scope of the ABS guide.

'The wording is pretty simple and clear in our opinion, in so far that it falls within the guide. It doesn't pull up short of saying it is designed in accordance with the guide. It is all in the words, so I am not quite sure where they are coming from. I am dumbfounded', Wharro added. "

In fact if it is only this is pretty ridiculous because something that is inside the minimum scope is made according with the ABS guide, but it seems that there is more to it and that most of these boats are old and cannot simply qualify inside class A EC category that today is mandatory for offshore races (for boats made recently), furthermore it seems that the alteration was not projected by an NA and that only later one was called to say that what was already made was OK and inside ABS rules.

Anyway all this is quite odd because if a NA certified the boat saying that it was made according with the rules it is his responsibility and the race direction has no power or authority to put that in question. Furthermore no clarification was made by the race direction except to say that the needed documents were not delivered.

Face to the skipper statements regarding all needing documents to have been delivered and taking into consideration that Wild Thing was a main contender, the direction should have made clear what was the problem and what was missing. Not having done so made all this subject suspicious and gave some credibility to the conspiratorial theory that was suggested by Wild Thing skipper, Grant Wharington.

All very odd and ugly:(

Sail-World.com : Rolex Sydney Hobart 2012

Regarding the race and controversy, some movies:




 

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Discussion Starter · #3,356 ·
Southern wind, big and beautiful yachts.

This ones will not interest anyone in what regards having one, unless that there is a billionaire following this thread:D but interests me and I hope some more because they are just beautiful. I rather much prefer to have very rich guys sailing this beauties and given us the pleasure to look at them then to see them on those monstrous and ugly gigantic motorboats, not even mention pollution.

Most of this beauties are made in Italy were it seems that rich men have a better taste and choose in a considerable number sailing Yachts instead of Motor yachts. This shipyard is not an Italian one, it is on South Africa. South Africa producing luxury sailing yachts? Well it makes sense when you discover that the owner is an Italian:D

The owner, Guglielmo Persico, and yachtsman himself as a great taste and just had some of the best world Architects (Farr, Reichel-Pugh and Nauta) for designing the boats under his specifications that turned out where just what rich man wanted. Not difficult for him, since he is one of them;):

Our aim is to meet the needs of our clients who consider their yachts as vehicles to a better life.

Our vision is to deliver yachts that are designed and built to enjoy sailing and the marine environment to the full.

Our goal is to allow our clients to be able to choose where and when to enjoy their sailing with no compromise on safety or comfort, regardless of destination or weather conditions.

Our desire is to build yachts for fast ocean passages, competitive racing, thrilling exploration and relaxing cruising in remote locations where very few other yachts can venture.

We make a special effort to provide information about our yachts in a rigorous manner, so as to assist our owners through the challenging process of choosing the best compromise between blue water capability, comfort and performance.
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We want our owners to enjoy the build process and to contribute their ideas so as to produce the semi-custom yacht most suited to their needs.

We strive to accomplish our goals through coherent analysis of our decisions by weighing up the pros and cons of every solution.

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Southern Wind Shipyard

Some videos with those beauties:






and my favorite, the SW110 Thalima. It is so well designed that it looks a lot smaller than it really is. Incredibly elegant and certainly one of the best Farr designs. Simply beautiful.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3,360 · (Edited)
Maxy yachts, a new type.

Thanks PCP,

Great stuff, I'd give my left nut to sail that SW110 single handed for an hour or two. Can you feel the power or what just from the videos.

Thanks Again.
Nice to know that someone besides me really loves that boat;)

You know, even on this type of yachts is starting the debate in what regards to what is the best hull form. Take a look at the designs and dimensions of the SW 110:









We can see that it is a narrow hull. Bigger boats can have narrower hulls but even so it is pretty narrow and very elegant. We can see also that it has a modern keel the kind that some insist it is only for racing boats:D.

Now take a look at this one, slightly smaller 30.48m to 33.60 but with more beam 8.30m to 7.30m and a completely different hull design, a Jean Marie Finot design that will be in the water this year:


















FC CUBE 100' Superyacht from finot-conq on Vimeo.



The boats have similar designed keels but the one one the Finot design is a lifting one giving a better smaller draft and a better deep draft 5.4m/3.0m to 4.2m. The B/D ratios are 29% for the Finot and 37% for the Farr. In the end those 1,2 more meters on the Farr draft would almost balance the effectiveness of the two ratios and then the Finot has much more hull form stability and also two 9.5T lateral water ballasts.

This would make the Finot a much more powerful and stiff boat and we can see the difference in the sail they carry upwind, 690m2 for the smaller boat and 592m2 for the Farr design. Off course the narrower and bigger boat would have less drag upwind and will need less sail for the same speed and it has also a bigger LWL so I would not be surprised if the Farr would be faster upwind, but downwind:D Jesus I am very curious the see the speed they can get out of that baby and I would not be surprised if they could go nearer or at 30K. They can carry 1400m2 of sail downwind.

But the main difference and the one that I think it is more important is in the crew that is needed to sail both boats. 3 or 4 on the Finot and a at least the double on the Farr boat.

Depending on the Finot Maxi designed performance, that I think it is going to be smashing on a transat and less so on more traditional races, we are probably going to see more of the type of Maxis appearing: One of the reasons a big sailboat is so expensive is the need to maintain and pay a big crew all year long.

With this one the costs regarding that would be cut in half not to mention the pleasure of having less crew around on the sailboat. The Finot type of Maxi will allow not only less crew but also more passengers , about the double regarding crew/passenger and as these boats are also chartered this can turn out to be a really improvement in what regards boat costs versus boat income.

Regards

Paulo
 
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