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RL24 (Rob Legg) Kookaburra
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
From the image you can see the entire interior is covered with carpeting. It is not a bad thing but I was wondering if there is a reason for this? Possibly for insulation or noise reduction? Was debating if in 2 -3 years of redoing the inside and replacing it with wood or another material that can be cleaned much easier.

 

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Carpet is a 'cheap, quick, and dirty' way to hide the rough laminating side of raw fiberglass. It has some insulation value, obviously, but is mainly a holding reservoir for moisture, mildew, dirt and odours.

Getting rid of it and doing something 'proper' is a great idea, but it does involve a fair amount of work. There are plenty of blogs and 'how to' sites about redoing headliners and ceilings (btw - on a boat the 'ceilings' are the insides of the hull, not the 'overhead')
 

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Learning the HARD way...
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I had a 1973 Plymouth Fury wagon


It had carpet that was installed to cover a cracked dashboard... My friends all took to calling it "The Hairy Beast."
 

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One can only imagine the mold and what not living in and under a carpet on a boat, especially one that only gets used occasionally. I'd prefer bare, painted fiberglass to carpet, no matter how nice the carpet looks.
 

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Carpet, headliner, whatever you call it... unless the boat was made with the deck undersides all gelcoated and smooth, you may find (when you tear it out) and unacceptable level of appearance.
 

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RL24 (Rob Legg) Kookaburra
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Carpet, headliner, whatever you call it... unless the boat was made with the deck undersides all gelcoated and smooth, you may find (when you tear it out) and unacceptable level of appearance.
You know that makes me think, would tearing it all out and just Gelcoating be practical? It would definitely be easier than relining it with another material and would certainly be much much quicker.
 

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I think you will have to do a lot of fairing before gel coating to get what you envision - a nice smooth, easy to clean surface. The rough side of fiberglass moldings can be very rough indeed. If I were faced with this job, I would prioritize thermal insulation along with maintainability.
John
 

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Though I'm not saying I like carpet on the interior...

... It is often much easier to clean and salvage than would be suposed, and it is not hard to prevent the return of smell and mildew in most cases. I've taken on some that looked as bad.

a. You need a carpet extractor with an upolstery attachment. Just buy one; good for home stuff to.

b. Clean with a good anti mildew formula (see link below--really cheap, and well tested). I've used this one on my boat and on numerous carpets in flooded basements. A scrub brush will help with stains. Other cleaners can help as well but are generally not needed.

c. The most important part. The final rinse should be at exactly these concentrations and is NOT rinsed with water! it is the borax/alkaline residue that prevents return.

One Penny Mildew Spray - Inside Practical Sailor Blog Article

While your mixing it up--it's cheap--make up some extra in jugs and hold on to it. Many uses.
 

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Swab
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You know that makes me think, would tearing it all out and just Gelcoating be practical? It would definitely be easier than relining it with another material and would certainly be much much quicker.
Gelcoat is not intended to be applied to cured rough fiberglass. It has no insulating properties and seems to me it would be a mess. I think it is better to remove the old insulating material, clean the surface thoroughly and either leave it bare, paint it or install a hard ceiling.

My solution? After removing the old ceiling material and cleaning (In my cased it was foam backed vinyl glued to the bare fiberglass), I installed a ceiling of yellow cedar strips over non-absorbent insulation material.

 

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RL24 (Rob Legg) Kookaburra
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for all the input. I definitely like the bead board idea for use in the future. Ill definitely try out the mildew spray and cleaning and see if I even want to remove all the carpet once its clean looking.
 

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Singlehander by Default
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My solution? After removing the old ceiling material and cleaning (In my cased it was foam backed vinyl glued to the bare fiberglass), I installed a ceiling of yellow cedar strips over non-absorbent insulation material.

Wow--I really like the look you ended up with there. I imagine you could also expand some storage off of that with hooks and nets if needed. How much weight do you think you added to the boat?
 

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Swab
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There are hooks behind the trim at the top for hanging gear hammocks. Very handy on a crossing.

I think we probably added thirty or forty pounds of yellow cedar and SS screws. but we have modified the furniture in other ways so it is hard to tell what the net weight gain was.




These are a "Work in progress" photos so it looks a little better now. The cedar strips on the sole under the table are 1/2" thick. The ones higher up are 1/4".
 
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