SailNet Community banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is marine grade interior paint really necessary? Considering the higher cost, I'm leaning towards a good low VOC enamel from Sherwin-Williams. Automotive grade primer and two topcoats.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
FWIW a little off topic but I used Valspar Signature paint+primer, as a primer and Benjamin Moore enamel topcoat. I used this primer after discovering it adhered tenaciously to the rubrails on my Pearson topcoated with Interlux Perfection. Your topcoat of Sherwin-Williams should be fine. I only use marine grade on the exterior.
 

·
Old as Dirt!
Joined
·
3,487 Posts
Is marine grade interior paint really necessary? Considering the higher cost, I'm leaning towards a good low VOC enamel from Sherwin-Williams. Automotive grade primer and two topcoats.
In Don Casey's book, "This Old Boat" his recommendation for interior paint (Chapter Fourteen, "Brush and Roller", p. 321) is a good quality interior Alkyd enamel. "Marine" paint is unnecessary. The key to a good paint-job is a good preparation of the base including a good cleaning before applying paint. While it's not specified, you might find that a primer coat of "Kilz" is worth while particularly if you're dealing with an area that may be subject to mold. Note that you might be able to find a copy of Casey's book at your library or, an early edition, at a used book vendor. It is a very worthwhile addition to a boat's library.

FWIW...
 
  • Like
Reactions: copacabana

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
Marine paints like Brightside are nothing more than a common polyurethane enamel. The same as used in most floor and deck paints. Ask at your local paint store. We have been using a good grade of latex house paint for years and it last just as long and is as durable as any marine paints. We prefer a flat finish on the interior rather than a gloss. Chuck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
My previous boat was painted with non-marine enamel in the forepeak.
It was a hell with large flakes falling off.
I stripped it down as good as I could, and cleaned with acetone and painted it over with marine enamel. Years later when I sold the boat it still looked like new.
I think there is a difference.
 

·
Don't call me a "senior"!
Joined
·
968 Posts
My previous boat was painted with non-marine enamel in the forepeak.
It was a hell with large flakes falling off.
I stripped it down as good as I could, and cleaned with acetone and painted it over with marine enamel. Years later when I sold the boat it still looked like new.
I think there is a difference.
Were the surfaces prepped properly before the original paint job?
 

·
Senior Moment Member
Joined
·
13,300 Posts
+1 on the Penetrol - it really makes a difference with paint and varnish - different and better than thinning to get flow out as it doesn't thin the coating, just seems to affect its surface tension.

Forget Marine paints inside. They cost more because of abrasion resistance and UV additives, neither of which is needed below deck.

I use semi gloss acrylic kitchen & bath formulations. Never had a failure.

Scrub everything with TSP first.

Check the skid of mis-tints that all paint stores have. I've scored some great deals ($10/Gal) when an exact colour didn't matter.
 
  • Like
Reactions: othomas3

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,253 Posts
I would have no problem using a good quality oil-based enamel. I once tried a latex semi-gloss in the anchor locker. It was a disaster - didn't last a year. Had to remove it and repainted with Pettit Easypoxy which was still holding up fine when I sold the boat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
I bought a quart of Pettit Cabincoat interior paint and noted that it looked, smelled, and acted like ordinary latex house paint. I used up the quart painting the plastic laminate covered bulkheads and had a couple of spots where it peeled off with the making tape, despite thorough cleaning and sanding. It is advertised to stick without sanding.
I then went to Home Depot and had them match the color in exterior latex house paint at about 1/4 the price of the Pettit product. The clerk there recommended Glidden Gripper primer as a tie coat. I used that and had much better results. No peeling and the paint had been on for a year now with no peeling. I had a couple of drips of primer on the cabin sole that were a real b###h to remove. The stuff does stick.
 

·
Registered
Tartan 37
Joined
·
5,436 Posts
Well I'm surprised no one clarified where you intend to use the paint? At least I didn't see it asked...

For bilges, where it would often be wet, I say spend the money and use a barrier coat product two part epoxy paint

For dry bilge areas, bilgecoat is good

For interior areas like cabin bulkheads and such I think you have some great recommendations, I would probably use something high gloss like you would use in a bath or kitchen with a good primer first, like Kiltz
 

·
Senior Moment Member
Joined
·
13,300 Posts
Below decks I would argue for semi-gloss rather than high gloss. It hides irregularities better and creates a less sterile look than high gloss - especially in white.

If using white, I would recommend some kind of "off" white rather than pure white - again to reduce the sterility.

On the outside however, exactly the opposite - go for the purest, glossiest white you can find. Interlux Blue-Glo white is very good looking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,550 Posts
Well I'm surprised no one clarified where you intend to use the paint? At least I didn't see it asked...

For bilges, where it would often be wet, I say spend the money and use a barrier coat product two part epoxy paint

For dry bilge areas, bilgecoat is good

For interior areas like cabin bulkheads and such I think you have some great recommendations, I would probably use something high gloss like you would use in a bath or kitchen with a good primer first, like Kiltz
I am going to be painting the interior of my boat in the next few months. My bilge has never been painted. Should I even paint it? I would like it to be painted just to look good and clean- but am I creating a maintenance problem? Since I have do have some prop shaft seal leakage, my bilge is wet at the bottom- is it a problme to use "Bilge Coat" paint? Will it fail or should I use barrier coat as you suggest?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,550 Posts
FWIW my boat's interior was painted with exterior latex house paint by PO and it is not holding up well. Some of the cause is prep I am sure, but if the house paint on the boat sits in water- like if there is a leak and the bottom of a locker gets wet- the paint will peel. I assume a paint such as Bilge Coat would not do this. I have also painted my house covered deck with a Benjamin Moore exterior deck paint and while it is ok for the house deck, no way I would use it on the boat- it just would not hold up (and this paint is advertised for exterior uncovered decks). I have used Easypoxy on my boat deck and it has held up well. I would just be careful trying to save a few bucks on materials when you time in prep and application are worth a lot too. For me I would rather pay a little extra instead of saving a little and taking a big risk. Now I am left with the task of stripping off all that latex paint from the interior of my boat. Any ideas? Should I sand or use a stripper? Would acetone work?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
I am going to be painting the interior of my boat in the next few months. My bilge has never been painted. Should I even paint it? I would like it to be painted just to look good and clean- but am I creating a maintenance problem? Since I have do have some prop shaft seal leakage, my bilge is wet at the bottom- is it a problme to use "Bilge Coat" paint? Will it fail or should I use barrier coat as you suggest?
You will run the risk of paint flakes clogging your bilge pumps.
 

·
Registered
Tartan 37
Joined
·
5,436 Posts
I am going to be painting the interior of my boat in the next few months. My bilge has never been painted. Should I even paint it? I would like it to be painted just to look good and clean- but am I creating a maintenance problem? Since I have do have some prop shaft seal leakage, my bilge is wet at the bottom- is it a problme to use "Bilge Coat" paint? Will it fail or should I use barrier coat as you suggest?
In my non-professional opinion based on what others advised me in the passed, I would use a 2 part barrier coat type epoxy paint such as Pettit for the area of the bilge that is always wet. Because I have a keel stepped mast, I always have a about 8 oz of water in the lowest part of the bilge, therefore I used barrier coat. In lockers I used Bilgekote. All is holding up well after two years, no signs of flaking anywhere...but I prepped it well. Starting with a power wash where I could then several de-greasers applications followed by a good rinse, wiped down with mineral spirits IIRC, let dry with air circulation for several days, then apply the paints.

Don't mind all the dangling wires, they have since been organized.

This shows new Bilgkote in the engine room area under the cockpit.



New painted engine bed using white bilgkote



After most of the painting, Sundown "Sound and Heat" insulation





Hull Barrier coated, going on 8 plus years and no signs of blisters, and I leave the boat in all year round FWIW

 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top