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Discussion Starter #1
Hello

I'm new to this forum. I have a bit of sailing experience mainly coastal and I have recently been given a 38' sailboat with an aluminum hull. The hull itself is in great shape as well as most of the hardware on the deck and rigging. The main issue is that the interior has seen better days and is in need of a spruce up.

I am in the beginning phases of purchasing hardware for the remodel. I was planning on using 316 SS fasteners for the cupboards, brackets etc. However, since its an interior use I was wondering if I could get away with 18-8 hardware and 304 SS brackets. Any thoughts or experience with this is much appreciated.

Cheers.
 

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Sea Sprite 23 #110 (20)
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wow.. that interior has seen better days. How much of the wood is salvagable with elbow grease? it doesn't look broken, just not kept bright
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The vast majority of the wood is in pretty good shape just needing a sand and varnish. Its mainly the cupboards and drawers which need rebuilding. I also plan on adding a few storage spaces in the bow. I'm wondering if it would be necessary to use SS316 hardware to rebuild these pieces or possibly save some money to spend on electronics by using SS304 or 18-8 hardware in the interior only.
 

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316 is only really necessary outside and not even there in many cases. It is more corrosion resistant but slightly weaker than 302/304.

Any kind of S/S will be fine below - its ability to shine is the most important thing down there. ;)
 

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s/v Tiger Lily
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Is that marine grade plywood on some of the built parts? Is it teak? Are those surfaces original or is it DIY? Overall it may just be cosmetic.
 

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One of None
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I would be concerned about any fastenings that have to hold things to the hull or it's stringers. Was this boat a boat that was built and they never finished the interior?

Hint, you could maybe find a hurricane boat of similar size and pull the insides from that for yours. Good luck! There's a hunter 33 in my club that had rotten plywood for an interior that was never done, the new owner has done wonders with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
All the wood is original to the boat. The boat got flooded and the the affected pieces need to be taken out and replaced. Not entirely sure what kind of wood it is throughout or how it got flooded. The plywood is marine grade however. Basically I am redoing the interior bringing it back up to par. Then redoing the electrical/electronics system. The engine has been replaced and the fuel system has been fixed.
 

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s/v Tiger Lily
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That interior has pretty lines. I like the angled supports. That will really clean up nicely.
 

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Hello

...I have a bit of sailing experience mainly coastal and I have recently been given a 38' sailboat with an aluminum hull...
Given, as in free? Wow!

She is a pretty boat, deserves a dedicated owner.

No need for 316 inside as was said above, careful if you attach anything to hull stringers, etc. You may also want to check all things electrical.

Best of luck and keep us posted.
 

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Whilst you have it all apart is the best time to run brand new wiring, for everything. Trust me, it will be cheaper and much easier to do, and you can make up a wiring diagram from the start and know just where everything is on your boat. That will come in handy if you ever have to do any work fifteen years from now for some reason.

Congratulations on getting it and good luck with all the work.
 

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Sea Sprite 23 #110 (20)
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good idea Mark.

Most boats have questionable wiring from new. Add to that mix some owners who didn't quite know now to properly add a radio or other electronics, plus a few years around seawater... it is a recipe for a serious migrane or two as you try to track down any issues
 

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Señor Member
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OS,

Congrats on the windfall -- I reckon you're gonna come out well ahead value wise.

As for the fasteners, like others have said 18-8/304 will be more than suitable as long as they will not come into contact with any aluminum parts of the boat. Like you probably know, SS and AL don't play nice together if moisture gets into the mix.

+1 on what others have recommended about investing the time/money on a rewire while you've got everything peeled apart now. You also may want to think about plumbing, ventilation, and other systems that usually get tucked into very hard to reach areas.

Have fun with the project.
 

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good idea Mark.

Most boats have questionable wiring from new. Add to that mix some owners who didn't quite know now to properly add a radio or other electronics, plus a few years around seawater... it is a recipe for a serious migrane or two as you try to track down any issues
Been there done that haha, I have purchased a few boats from insurance companies and wished they had the interior removed completely by the time I got done fixing the wiring. One of them I ended up doing just that, it had more shorts and intermittent outages than it had good wires.

I am not sure I want someone to give me a boat, but if the outside looks that good then I would go for it...
 

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Sea Sprite 23 #110 (20)
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OS,

Congrats on the windfall -- I reckon you're gonna come out well ahead value wise.

As for the fasteners, like others have said 18-8/304 will be more than suitable as long as they will not come into contact with any aluminum parts of the boat. Like you probably know, SS and AL don't play nice together if moisture gets into the mix.

+1 on what others have recommended about investing the time/money on a rewire while you've got everything peeled apart now. You also may want to think about plumbing, ventilation, and other systems that usually get tucked into very hard to reach areas.

Have fun with the project.
Why SS at all for the fasteners.. why not bronze or brass screws? Heck, it's only interior.. you could even use Aluminum
 

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304 stainless fasteners are inexpensive and stronger than aluminum or bronze, as well as more readily available.

The wiring of a metal boat is unlike a wood or fiberglass boat though. Everything must be isolated from the hull, especially watch items like motors of pumps that are case grounded. Best practice would be double pole breakers on all Dc loads so when it is off, it is really off with no chance of leakage. Engine isolation is tougher but the easiest solution I have heard is a switch in the negative to the engine that is open except when it is running. This can be wired through a relay so it switches with the ignition.

Pretty boat and for free as well! Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for all the comments and good advice!

I plan to tackle this project in three phases. The first being interior redesign, doing any structural work and cosmetic finishing work necessary on the inside. The second is redoing the entire electrical system. I have already more or less redesigned the entire electrical system which is going to implemented in phases. After doing the interior and leaving provisions for wiring, phase two will be to redo all the wiring run new wires throughout as well as setup a new power distribution system, battery bank etc. The third phase of the project would be to get all the electronics hooked up as well as solar panels, plumbing etc. I'm going to do the interior in such a way that any areas needing wiring or piping are always accessible using removable panels instead of fixed panels. This will be helpful for phases 2 and 3 as well as in the long run when I need to fix/maintain systems.

I know it seems backwards to do the interior work and cosmetic stuff before finalizing wiring and piping but I plan to do this project spread out over 1.5 years with the end goal of being able to live aboard at the end. So it is more important for me to be able to get the boat in good shape with basic amenities and then incrementally add to the electrical and plumbing systems while living aboard. Also I have fully planned out the wiring etc. so it will not be very hard to leave provisions while redoing the interior.
 

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sailing soon
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Thanks for all the comments and good advice!

I plan to tackle this project in three phases. The first being interior redesign, doing any structural work and cosmetic finishing work necessary on the inside. The second is redoing the entire electrical system. I have already more or less redesigned the entire electrical system which is going to implemented in phases. After doing the interior and leaving provisions for wiring, phase two will be to redo all the wiring run new wires throughout as well as setup a new power distribution system, battery bank etc. The third phase of the project would be to get all the electronics hooked up as well as solar panels, plumbing etc. I'm going to do the interior in such a way that any areas needing wiring or piping are always accessible using removable panels instead of fixed panels. This will be helpful for phases 2 and 3 as well as in the long run when I need to fix/maintain systems.

I know it seems backwards to do the interior work and cosmetic stuff before finalizing wiring and piping but I plan to do this project spread out over 1.5 years with the end goal of being able to live aboard at the end. So it is more important for me to be able to get the boat in good shape with basic amenities and then incrementally add to the electrical and plumbing systems while living aboard. Also I have fully planned out the wiring etc. so it will not be very hard to leave provisions while redoing the interior.
If you intend to do the final electrical wiring after you finish the interior work I would suggest you at least run any main runs that will be covered by the interior wood or other stuff that is going to cover the main runs and make them hard to get at.

I can see the logic in doing it in stages, just be intelligent in the stages you do it in and all should be great.
 

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I'd install plastic conduit up under the hull/deck area. That way you can fish wires any time you want and they are in a dry area.
 

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I'd install plastic conduit up under the hull/deck area. That way you can fish wires any time you want and they are in a dry area.
That is what I was getting at, pull your main run conduit or the wiring in the conduit prior to buttoning it back up under a bunch of stuff or when the time comes you will be kicking yourself for not doing it when it was way cheaper and way easier.
 
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