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The interior of my boat has teak wood all over. She's an 81 boat and the wood looks dry and dull. I'll be placing her on the market this coming spring and would like her to look her best for an easy sale. What kind of treatment should I give the interior? Of course I don't want to spend a fortune or huge amounts of time on this project. Any suggestions?
 

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islander bahama 24
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Sand with holystone then light teak oil on all but the deck just holystone that
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Holystone seems to be a soft stone; I'm sure it wouldn't be easy to sand the whole interior of a 31 footer with that. Thank you for the reply but I'll pass on that. I'm only trying to make the interior wood look fresher for a quick sale.
 

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islander bahama 24
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At least a quick rubdown with teak oil will make it shine
 

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You can try lemon oil as well. It'll look great with just one application, but like all oils, it's not a long term fix. I would imagine that re-applying every 6 months will keep it looking nice. Lemon oil has the added advantage of being cheap, smelling pleasant and it's a natural mold killer.
 

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Normally, I'd recommend against using the oils but in this case it may be the best option. But first, I'd give the interior wood a good cleaning. There are a variety of products available, but I'd go with a good wipedown using just paint thinner. It will cut through the dirt and grease faster than most "cleaners" at a fraction of the cost. Then I'd go with any of the teak oils, excluding Cetol or any of the varnishes. You will have to re-apply in a few months, but it will be quick and easy and look ok.

If you were keeping the boat, I'd strongly recommend against the oils as they are largely a waste of time, IMO. Far better to clean the wood using acetone, lacquer thinner, or paint thinner followed by a 3-4 coats of urethane for a permanent finish. After applying the the urethane, you're done for the next 10 years.
 

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The interior of my boat has teak wood all over. She's an 81 boat and the wood looks dry and dull. I'll be placing her on the market this coming spring and would like her to look her best for an easy sale. What kind of treatment should I give the interior? Of course I don't want to spend a fortune or huge amounts of time on this project. Any suggestions?
Does the wood have a clear finish on it now (or not so clear now)? Is it varnished? Or just bare wood? You are not clear on that. You state it looks "dry and dull"
 

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We use diluted vinegar to clean then treat with Weimans lemon oil. If the wood is dry, you may need to go over it twice with the oil. Advantage is that it's a mild treatment and the next owner won't have to undo anything if they want to varnish, etc.
 

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SAND???? NO, NO, NO, NOT inside!

What we, Jill, uses works GREAT!
She first cleans with Amazon's Teak cleaner, then the prep and then the Golden Oil. See them at Jamestown Marine at;
Amazon Golden Teak Oil



Can't seem to upload a photo of our inside just now......

Greg
 

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Start with the simplest solution first. Wet two square feet a damp sponge, wash wet area with **** and Span solution suing a soft brush of 3M pad across the grain, rinse with clear water, and towel dry.
 

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Dry and dull sounds like it was oiled in the past, if so, take some 0000 bronze wool and scuff it, wipe it down with denatured alcohol and rag on some Daly's seafin teak oil
 

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Poop has the right idea. Keep in mind the original poster said it is the interior that needs help. As long as the wood does not have a shiny varnish or polyurathane finish the best option is to clean and use a good oil. A light sanding on water stained areas may be needed. My boat is done this way, requres a redo every 10-12 years. Outside oiled teak is good for about 6 months.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks to all for your input. I think I'll go with the lemon oil option after the vinegar clean. It just might do the trick.
Again, thanx a bunch.
 
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