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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,
I am an experienced dinghy sailor (Enterprise, Wayfarer etc..),from the UK now living in Michigan. I want to teach my two boys (13,16) to sail on Lake Erie near Monroe Mi, but not interested in joining a club at this time. I will trailer the boat to launch, and will need to use a small motor to get out to the lake. I have done quite a bit of research and narrowed down to either an Interlake or a Flying Scot as boats that are built for the lake. As we'll be sailing alone and not part of a flotilla, I'd like a boat that is stable enough that we won't be swimming unless we intend to, but is still fun to hike out on. It seems to me that the Scot is the better choice, but would appreciate any advice.
Is either of these boats recommended for lone sailing ( one boat, not singlehanded ) on the choppy Lake Erie ?
Is so which is the better choice ?
Of course, we'd plan for communication in case we hit trouble, and have appropriate safety gear.

Thanks,
Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Greg, sorry should have said - not looking to spend a fortune until I see how the boys take to it. Maybe 3-5k. I liked the idea of these boats due to their length for the choppy waters, in as much as they were designed for it ( albeit a long long time ago !)
What would you suggest ? I'd prefer a monohull for this first experience. Thanks for the tip if I do decide to go the Scot route..
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Thanks for all the replies !
Greg, I had noticed that your opinion was atypical, the most common sentiment is that it is a decent all rounder. If I was racing I'd probably be thinking similarly.
The difficulty to right is a big concern. My research indicates that the boat can capsize and recover with little water on board, but I was a little sceptical of how that might be under other conditions than still water. Having had a previous issue whereby my mast became stuck in mud, I'm not beyond adding a little mast flotation. ( a former boat of mine was fondly christened "HMS Ballcock" due to my selection of floater ). The need to be pulled back afloat is a concern - as I mentioned I will not be in a flotilla, and so no tow boat will be there to pull me back.
WRT to the comments regarding the lightening, but was put off by the complexity of the mast setting as I'll always be trailering. I will have the boys to help the physical part, but the time taken would be a concern. If I'm going by bad information please correct me.
I hadn't considered the O'Day - I'll take a look..
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The righting is an issue for me. I do want a boat that's fairly stable, and by all accounts tipping a Scot is hard to do, but should it happen I need to be able to recover. Lake Erie gets choppy, and even on a nice day the Scot is going to fill up over the seat molding if on its side. As a result I'm back researching on the 'net, and have come across the Buccaneer 18. Seems to be available at reasonable prices, can be daysailed, but most notably has the enclosed hull. Any issues with this choice ?
Thanks for the help..
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
First, thanks for al the input, especially Greg. I don't find the comments at all negative. My posting was intended to ask opinions, and your quick and knowledeable replies are just as I am looking for.
I will look again at the lightning. They are sailed at my local club, but as I don't plan to race that hasn't been a big driver. However, such a purchase would keep that option open.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Well, done some research. The Lightning site is a great place. It does look like this boat could be a good choice - thanks to those who lead me to it.
Now I'm looking at available boats. Given that I'm not planning national racing, are there any years/sail number it should avoid ? The Lightning site warns not to buy before 1990, and notes that the rigging was changed in 1986, and that newer boats have better recovery.
Are these significant things that I should be concerned about ?
I've found a nice 1984 Nickels that's near me and in my budget...
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Well, I always like to close out these threads instead of just leaving them hang.

First, thanks to all for your time and advice.

So, what did I buy ? Lightning, Scot, Highlander, Thistle, Interlake ???
Sorry - none of the above. Couldn't convince myself that lone sailing in a small craft was wise on Erie, and the comments on the poor ability of these larger dinghys to be righted confirmed my concerns.

I decided to go a bit bigger, and acquired a 1984 Catalina 27. Of course, now I need a dock, but it should still meet the first purpose ( teaching my boys to sail ) and also cover some family outings to the Islands.
Hope to see you out there !!
Thanks.
 
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