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Sailboat Reboot
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This is a new thread that I started after reading the thread at http://www.sailnet.com/forums/learning-sail/174618-sailing-qualification-guide.html

I raise the question: Is there value in independently producing information about sailing (in the instant case - International Sailing Requirements) rather than supporting existing sites (e.g. http://www.noonsite.com/ that already provide extensive information for cruisers?

I understand those that want to provide a commercial service going it alone. But what about the rest of us? Would not the information be more complete, better researched, and more current if supported by the boating community?

A final thought. IMHO no document can possibly keep up to date on any regulatory issue. There must be thousands of governmental organizations constantly writing and re-writing requirements. It seems to me that the only valid way to address such an issue is with a large index of links (don't even ask how you index the index so people can find the requirements for the specific location of interest - I would need to drink a lot of coffee before addressing that one...)

What do you think?

Fair winds and following seas :)
 

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Beneteau 393
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The Internet offers no friendship. If a site is put up and its irrelevant the tumbleweeds maybe invisible but stark.

A different, better, site could close Noonsite down in a year or two.

I back Noonsite.

I havent really read the Sailing Requirements thread because it doesnt interest me as sailing qualifications in each country have little or no need for disemination to people sailing in, or people in other countries.

Why do I need to know the qualifications needed in the next country? I am not bound by them, I am a visitor, I just need international or my home country qualifications.

:)

Mark
 

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Just some thoughts off the top of my head.

It's easier for a site such as Noonsite to quickly update information. A book is out of date quickly and harder to get the updated information to readers. Even an ebook compared to a continually updated website.

A website or a forum such as SSCA or SailNet posting information provided by people out there who experience it first hand has more credibility to me than someone sitting in one country scouring the internet and sometimes interpreting the information incorrectly.

Also more helpful was having several mentors who could guide me. People I've met face to face and who became trusted friends. They are usually my first stop for information and to verify information that I read somewhere.
 

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Mermaid Hunter
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Why do I need to know the qualifications needed in the next country? I am not bound by them, I am a visitor, I just need international or my home country qualifications.
Mostly but not always. For example for a while New Zealand imposed readiness requirements on everyone before allowing them to leave. Ultimately those requirements were dropped for nationals of other countries, but for quite some time things were awkward and expensive for a lot of cruisers.

Noonsite, SSCA, and the regional cruiser's net did a pretty good job of keeping folks informed but there were still some surprises.
 

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Many thanks for all your comments.. I understand what you mean by keeping the regulations up to date, but we do plan to do this and update the ebook regularly.

The idea of the book is that a reader would only need the sections relevant to them, which can be easily found in the table of contents.

It's our first ever attempt at an ebook, I don't think we've done too badly :)

In case you missed it; How to Learn to Sail: A Beginners Guide to Sailing Course Qualifications, Regulations & Licenses

All the best, Lee
 
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