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Apparently there is a Lenovo miix 2 tablet with this capability. Seems like there should be other choices out there, but after talking to the apple folks there is nothing in their product line that has this capability other than using wi fi which is useless off shore. I've been using a garmin product for over 5 years now that fits on my wrist that tells me my speed while I jog that has the built in gps antenna. You would think that tablets could have this capability without having to get a service contract with the phone company.
 

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You don't have to have a service contract on an ipad to use the GPS. But you do have to buy one with the capability.

The other option is to buy a wifi only ipad and a bluetooth GPS. But this is the same price as buying the 3G version in the first place.
 

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I have a Asus Vivo Tab Smart with a built in GPS.

Open CPN and Centrafuse Localizer are the programs I use.

I recently added Navionics Central and South America
 

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Apparently there is a Lenovo miix 2 tablet with this capability. Seems like there should be other choices out there, but after talking to the apple folks there is nothing in their product line that has this capability other than using wi fi which is useless off shore. I've been using a garmin product for over 5 years now that fits on my wrist that tells me my speed while I jog that has the built in gps antenna. You would think that tablets could have this capability without having to get a service contract with the phone company.
I have both Miix2 8" model and iPad.

Regarding the Miix2 8", yes it does have GPS built in, and it works without any WiFi, though initial fix can take a few minutes if you're booting up a mile or so from where you last shut down. With WiFi it seems to get a faster initial fix, presumably because it has a good guess of your location from WiFi mapping. But it definitely works without WiFi (or 3G/4G).

Note that only the 8" models of the Miix2 have built-in GPS. The 10" and 11" models reportedly do not have GPS.

Also note that Microsoft's support for tablet GPS chips is a little odd under Windows 8. Out of the box, the GPS only works with Metro apps. Windows programs that are used to seeing GPS on a COM port or TCP port will not work. But there are free and low-cost utilities that will create a COM or TCP stream from the GPS, so that fixed everything.

I am shocked that any Apple Store employee would give you such incorrect advice. Apple tries to be better than that. If, on the other hand, "the apple folks" are Apple enthusiasts on Internet message boards, then you get what you pay for (or less). As Stumble said, buying an iPad with wireless 3G/4G capability gives you a fully functional GPS. It works perfectly fine when you're out of radio range (I've confirmed this with our own iPad). And if you don't want to pay for the wireless service, just don't buy it.

FWIW, I run OpenCPN under Windows 8.1 on the Miix2. I still like it better than any iOS or Android app I've tried. YMMV.
 

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.....talking to the apple folks there is nothing in their product line that has this capability other than using wi fi which is useless off shore........
Given how long the iPad has been out, I'm truly amazed that this confusion persists. As noted, you do not require cell or wifi for the built-in gps receiver to operate. Apple simply bundles the cellular broadband capability with the gps receiver in their higher end model. You do need to buy the cellular capable model, which I find most likely what the rep told you, and that confuses people. You do not need to use wifi or cell or even purchase a contract for the gps to fully function.

However, without cell contact or wifi, it may take a minute or so for the gps reciever to determine it's initial location. That's because a wifi or cell signal of any kind is good enough to approximate your location on earth and have the receiver focus on the most proximate satellites, rather than go through them all. No reason to roll one's eyes, however. This is what any handheld gps does, although, some will assume your last known location and start checking there.

Our iPad has already been pressed into service as our backup nav in two very critical occasions, when our plotter failed.
 

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We are pleased with our iPad with GPS built-in. For some reason the Navionics charts for the iPad sometimes show more than the Navionics Gold charts for the plotter.
 

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We are pleased with our iPad with GPS built-in. For some reason the Navionics charts for the iPad sometimes show more than the Navionics Gold charts for the plotter.
The Navionics on my Android phone has much more functionality than the Navionics HD on my Win 8.1 tablet.
 
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I have a Samsung Note 10 tablet (Android). It's the Wi-Fi only version, so no 3G or 4G, but still has the GPS chip. I also run the Raymarine app to link it to my e7 MFD. Not only very convenient, the tablet is a bigger display than the MFD. :)
 

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Apparently there is a Lenovo miix 2 tablet with this capability. Seems like there should be other choices out there, but after talking to the apple folks there is nothing in their product line that has this capability other than using wi fi which is useless off shore. I've been using a garmin product for over 5 years now that fits on my wrist that tells me my speed while I jog that has the built in gps antenna. You would think that tablets could have this capability without having to get a service contract with the phone company.
Dee-
We use a 3rd gen. iPad with built-in WiFi/Bluetooth/GPS with about half dozen Nav apps..but really like the iNavX app....and best if all...all free..thanks to Les's gazillion travel points..:)

Clay
S/V Tango
 

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If iPad doesn't have GPS how did I get these two shots...

Or am I part of an Apple conspiracy? Damn it! You found me out! Elvis is the helmsman (mind you he is gettin a bit old even for that.)
BTW the chart one you are looking for the green dot under "Atlantic Ocean"... ummm but not under the ocean, if ya know what I mean
 

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A geek told me I could dowload an app for a Samsung Tab 3...that makes it gps capable? I must try this! On our vacation sail North I found I used the Navionics on my phone more than the iPad (generously loaned to me by chef2sail).

I have now have a chartplotter and found the phone apps on my Samsung Galaxy S5 Active easier to use than a laptop or tablet/iPad...each their own.

The Marine Traffic app along with the mAIS app by Marine Traffic was great as well...search our boat and when I activated the AIS app...folks could track us...pretty cool.

Now I'm causing thread drift...surprise! ;-)
 

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A geek told me I could dowload an app for a Samsung Tab 3...that makes it gps capable?......
I'm not familiar, but no app is going to create a gps receiver. If you Tab 3 has a gps receiver, the app is just making use of it.

However, old school early road navigation apps would not actually use gps, but would rather triangulate cell tower signals. If that's what your geek friend is suggesting, its not at all the same accuracy as gps. The software would first do the very rough calcs and then look for what road is nearby where it thinks you are. When this tech first came out, it was fascinating that a phone could put you in the right neighborhood, but they were not nearly accurate enough to be useful.
 

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For what it's worth, I'm still an apple user. iPhone and iPad. I like the combo, because apps transfer across the two for free, some even update each other for things I've saved. For example, my Charts and Tides app is on both.

For my past cruise, I decided to get the LifeProof case for my phone and almost always kept it in my pocket. The screen is seriously disadvantaged by size, to be useful for serious nav. However, when I was interested in how many more mile to my destination and/or alternative (I did duck a thunderstorm by beating it to an alt anchorage last week), its just a couple of easy taps on the screen. The live weather radar app was invaluable too. Never got up from the helm. Lifeproof case is fully waterproof and barely bigger than the phone itself.
 

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I'm not familiar, but no app is going to create a gps receiver. If you Tab 3 has a gps receiver, the app is just making use of it.

However, old school early road navigation apps would not actually use gps, but would rather triangulate cell tower signals. If that's what your geek friend is suggesting, its not at all the same accuracy as gps. The software would first do the very rough calcs and then look for what road is nearby where it thinks you are. When this tech first came out, it was fascinating that a phone could put you in the right neighborhood, but they were not nearly accurate enough to be useful.
I think its the first thing you mention...the "geek" was a Best Buy of Office Depot associate iircc
 

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There is some confusion as what type of GPS chip is in iPads/iPhones as I was. Technically they are built in Assisted GPS (aGPS)not Stand alone GPS (sGPS)chips being 'assisted' by either WiFi or Cellular to access internet maps.

Assisted GPS - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Now my understanding with pre-loaded maps such as iNAVx there no need for 'assistance' to access on-line map data such as Google maps.

But I'm not sure if the current generation iPad/iPhone has the capability to fall back to autonomous mode when there is no (WiFi/Cellular)internet connectivity...such as being off shore.
 

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Goodness, will the misinformation never end.

Assisted has nothing to do with online access to maps. There are dozens of GPS satellites around the globe and any gps needs to recognize a certain number of them to operate reliably. When started, they begin to search for which are nearby, as the device has no idea where it is. With "assistance" it already knows its in Europe or North America, for example, and begins to look first for those that it should find. This just speeds up the start up process, but has nothing whatsoever to do with performance thereafter. Some gps units will store their last known position to start looking there first. Some chartplotter antennas actually do this. You may not even be aware that your antenna has a little watch battery and processor inside for this purpose.

Whether access is needed to wifi or cell to get a map, is strictly a matter of how the app you are using was written. Has nothing to do with the GPS receiver.
 

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3rd generation iPad with GPS here using iNavx and navionics charts. Works just as well as my handheld Garmin, completely independent of wifi or cell. Sometimes I see a message suggesting I turn on wifi and cell data, but it picks up a GPS signal just fine without.


Why go fast, when you can go slow
 

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There is some confusion as what type of GPS chip is in iPads/iPhones as I was. Technically they are built in Assisted GPS (aGPS)not Stand alone GPS (sGPS)chips being 'assisted' by either WiFi or Cellular to access internet maps.

Assisted GPS - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Now my understanding with pre-loaded maps such as iNAVx there no need for 'assistance' to access on-line map data such as Google maps.

But I'm not sure if the current generation iPad/iPhone has the capability to fall back to autonomous mode when there is no (WiFi/Cellular)internet connectivity...such as being off shore.
A-GPS, means that the system can download ephermis data from a cell network at much higher speeds then from the GPS sat network. ( 12 - 15 minutes) this greatly increases TTFX ( Time to first fix). Equally some towers etc can provide location information as well as using RSSI information to triangulate Wifi hotspots etc.

But If the "Assisted" isn't available , then the GPS works like any other standalone GPS system quite happily

IN that regard A-GPS are better then GPS, not the other way round.

ANY APPLE WITH a GPS CHIP, works independently of any other communications system.
 
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