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Discussion Starter #1
We''re seriously considering buying an 1980 Irwin 30 Citation. Before making the leap for our first boat, we''d appreciate some advice from those who own or have owned one. We are interested in things like sailing characteristics, plusses & minuses of the boat, reliability of the Yanmar 2QM15 diesel, reliability of the fresh water & waste holding tanks, etc....
Thanks... Bob
 

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The one I''m familiar with sails at our local club on the LI Sound, and does very well on the race course, in all conditions. The cockpit is deep and comfortable.

I''m not sure if it''s because the boat is raced, but the deck around the mast is VERY deflected. He also has quite a few deck leaks that seem unresolvable.This boat has an A4.
 

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I currently own a 1980 Irwin Citation 34. Bought the boat in New Jersey 4 years ago and have moved it with me from Atlantic City to Las Vegas and now it''s w/me in San Francisco. Although not a 30'' I''ll share what I have experienced. In Atlantic City, I out ran a hurricane (not that I had a choice)while in Cape May. It handled 12 foot seas very well and also does well in modest winds. In Lake Mead Las Vegas, it also handled the unforseen desert gusts of 50mph. In short, I have found it to be a very safe boat with good performance and an excellent and very compfortable cabin layout. Arguably, one of the best coastal cruisers for the money. After 3 years I stripped the bottom to apply a bottom barrier coat and didn''t have one blister. That amazed everyone in Lake Mead as the 20 year old boat didn''t have a barrier coat on it, the antifoul was blistered and shot and the temp of the water reachs upper 80s to 90 in summer. My family and I love the boat but it has its faults - 1)the 15hp yanmar (same as yours)is an excellent engine and has never failed me, and like a British Seagull outboard can be torn apart and worked on easily-getting parts have never been a problem, but struggles in a good head wind. The boat should have had at least 24hp (for 12,000 lb boat). Major problem #2 - that beautiful teak interior your in love with is great until the the caulk around the plastic ports leak and rots the paneling from behind and then the H2o settles on the lovely leather-like headliner above your sleeping areas. You wont find out your ports leak until its too late. I hated the refrigerator interior look of boats twice its price and size and the warmth was one of the selling points to me but simplicity around opening ports does has its advantages. Anyway, I replaced all the paneling around the ports with new marine grade teak ply (like Irwin)and a home mixture of 4 stains to match, and replaced all six ports for under $1,000 in materials (including beer). This is the same case w/the 2 fixed windows. I replaced ours w/the new unbreakable stuff (but still scratchable)from 3M for under $100. keep fresh caulk on the windows and you shouldnt have a problem. Problem #3 keep fresh caulk on the chain plates at deck contact as water likes to travel to the lovely teak bulkhead and then that starts to rot behinfd the veneer. Now that I caught mine before it was too late, I am still asking for opinions on how to strengthen it for peace-of-mind w/out replaceing the entire bulkhead. Problem #4 excessive spider/stress cracks seem to be the one thing all Irwins share although I never had a structual problem yet. Problem #5 the 34'' heels very easily (keel model) but digs in at 15 to 20 degrees then moves fast (a little over 6 knots) Considering we have purchased and sold 5 homes from NJ to MN to MS to NV, and have kept the same boat (and employer) in that period reflects our feelings best. Both need attention and are a "pain in the a--" at times but we''re very satisfied.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for your thoughts.... We live in South Jersey, and once we make the leap, plan to sail in the Chesapeake. Your opinions regarding sailing performance confirm what others have been saying... now if I can get over the money hurdle!!

Bob
 

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Spend the $500 to $1,000 for a good marine survey. They always find a list of items that needs addressing and I have used this for my peace of mind and to counter offer for alot less then i put out for the survey. I have found that if you pay for the survey, the owner knows your serious, and while the boat is in the sling for the bottom check portion, review the already 12 page "broke items" survey list w/the seller. At that point, they and the broker are more willing to listen to reason. Besides, as mentioned, youll want the surveyor to check/meter the deck for moisture and delamination around the chain plates.
 

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Bob,
This past year I bought a 1986 Irwin Citation 35.5. I live aboard the boat in New Jersey and sail it about 3 times a week. The boat is very stable and comfortable. During severe rain storms I get a little bit of water inside the light in the head and inside the light in the galley. The cockpit is large and comfortable which is a plus while crusing and relaxing. I owned a Hunter 31 prior to this and this boat is a little more stable and a better choice for crusing. I would definately recommend buying the Irwin.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks David,

We made an offer yesterday, which was accepted after a little negotiation. As the excitement wanes some and I begin to arrange for the survey, insurance, slip, spring launch, etc, it gets alittle overwhelming...

Where do you sail at the Jersey Shore?

Bob
 

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Bob,
I am currently in Monmouth Beach where I live on my Irwin 35. I am sure that you will be very pleased with your Irwin and I hope the deal goes through for you. Look at Allstate Insurance, I found it to be the least expensive and you get great coverage. Years ago I used Teal Survayers and they did a thourough job. Where are you and where will you be keeping your boat ? Keep in touch and let me know how it goes.
Dave
 

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Had the ssurvey & sea trial today, and she "sailed" through it!! The surveyor was impressed by how well preserved she is & how well she sailed. Since I''ve never been on an Irwin before, I was glad for the opportunity to she how she felt in the water. As we entered the Delaware River a few miles north of the Tacony Bridge, we put the sails up, and she practically leaped forward as if to say, "Wanna go to Philly?" Unfortunately, we only had a short time.

Our plan is to keep her on the Chesapeake, either Rock Hall or Whorton Creek. We live in Medford so the trip down is a little over 2 hours.

The best quote on insurance came from Allstate. I''ve only heard good things about their coverage, so that''s one I can check off the list.

Can you tell that I''m psyched... Thanks for your help.

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Shipley:If you move the chain plates on your Irwin to the outside of the hull you hehe 1 stopped the leak into the bulkheads in the interior. 2 have more room to walk down the deck without any obstruction 3 she''ll go into the wind better because the jib dosen''t get hung up in the rigging. 4 it''s the cheapest way to fix the problem,especially if the damage is already done! Good Sailing!
 

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With all due respect, moving the chainplates to the hull on an Irwin 30 is extremely bad advice.

-First of all it is a major project to build up enough hull thickness to take the localized loadings of the chainplate bolts. a bulkhead repair is simple by comparison.
-Moving the chainplates outboard will absolutely kill windward performance of the boat. Adding even a couple degrees of incident angle at the middle of the genoa really alters pointing ability significantly. The outboard shroud placement of many older boats is often the single factor limiting thier pointing ability.

-You will need longer spreaders and shrouds, (and perhaps a new genoa) the cost of these first two items combined far exceed the cost of the bulkhead repair.

-And lastly, you''ll kill the value of the boat for any knowledgeable sailor and restrict its resale to someone who knows so little about sailing that they won''t realize how much the sailing performance of the boat has been compromised by the relocated shrouds.

Jeff
 
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jeff, just saw your comments - thx. noticed "blackening" of wood bulkhead, only behind port chainplate in cabin. discolorization extends about 1/4" from edge of chainplate. the rest of the bulkhead is fine. hsve been keeping fresh caulk on deck and havent had any further discolorization in last 3 years. i keep the stays under recommended tension (heavy and checked often with gauge) and chainplate has never pulled up in the slightest fraction. however, it''s un-nerving just looking at discolorization and knowing that water did get behind it at one time. any thoughts on how to reinforce the load for piece of mind as i usually sail in 15 - 25 knot winds on San Fran bay and usually with more sail then i should.
 
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