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Discussion Starter #1
I read everywhere on this forum that the 1983 Pearson 34 did NOT have a cored hull... just cored decks. But I found a link to specs sheet that says that the hull is balsa cored. The forum won't let me post the link apparently because this is my first post.

Can anyone shed some light? Am I missing something? I sure hope the boat I'm trying to get isn't balsa cored :(

Thanks in advance to anyone who can answer!
 

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would it not be better to actually verify ? One could find out easily enough with a quick removal of a thru hull. Cap would it be a deal breaker?
 

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Thank Denise- you're right, it would be but it's a trek out for me to see the boat (and I didn't check when I saw the boat the first time)

Perhaps they came as both if it was an option maybe.

It's not necessarily a deal breaker but I don't want to deal with a rotted out hull.
 

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I read everywhere on this forum that the 1983 Pearson 34 did NOT have a cored hull... just cored decks. But I found a link to specs sheet that says that the hull is balsa cored. The forum won't let me post the link apparently because this is my first post.
Can anyone shed some light? Am I missing something? I sure hope the boat I'm trying to get isn't balsa cored :(
Thanks in advance to anyone who can answer!
Given the deck coring saturation problems due to their use of rubber gaskets on the base of their stanchions, you already know that you need a really good deck survey with a moisture meter - done by a qualified surveyor - anyhow.
That person will survey the bottom as well.
Given the problems with the bottom coring in the J Boats of that vintage, I would be a bit reluctant to take a chance on that make of boat, even though there are valid engineering reasons for that type of construction, and they have a good design pedigree and decent sailing rep.

Loren
 

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The rubber gaskets on the stanchions of my Pearson also had plenty of polysulfide behind them. The holes in the deck were also counterbored to allow the polysulfide to build up and seal well. The system worked very well. I rebedded most of my deck hardware on my boat last year and there was no sign of moisture getting into the decks at all.

Tilton Pearson (TPI) made the J/Boats, not Pearson. They aren't the same company and the boats weren't made in the same factory.
 
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