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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So just closed on a Morgan 382, spent last weekend with the previous owner on shakedown. Know most of the systems below and have been a mechanic in my younger days so the diesel was easy. The survey went well, some minor needs in the future but nothing of concern. She is in Rock Hall, Md and I want to sail or motor sail up through NYC to the Hudson final destination of Point Bay Marina in Lake Champlain. I have done the locks in a power boat previously and talked to the marina that will step the mast.
I have done the 101, sailed a day with a private instructor in San Francisco and less than 20 hours logged in the last few years. In the past owned a Star, a 12' cat and spent hundreds of hours having fun on the water. I have bought all the charts and Pilot guides and plotted the route. Radar works well and I will add a new char tplotter before departure. I have purchased extra fuel filters, belts and clamps, have extra oil and water pump impellers. The Perkins 108 has less than 1700 hrs on it.
I am attempting to find a seasoned sailor to make the trip up with me as far as NYC then I feel I can handle it on up. Am I crazy to try this, should I just have it shipped?
 

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... Am I crazy to try this, ...
No. Be aware of your own limitations, the weather, the boat's needs and plan accordingly.

Try very, very hard not to have a schedule.
 
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Wandering Aimlessly
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You might also look for some one to "buddy" up with. Someone that's going that way, and is willing to keep pace with one and other.

I did that a few years ago with a new owner who had little to no experience, which gave him the security of having someone nearby, while he learned his new boat.
 

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First of all, CONGRATS on the new boat! :) As for your trip... YOU have to be honest with yourself. Sounds like alot of ground to cover and lots to be concerned with. Are there any bridges on the trip? If you are confident with your skills and knowledge of what your attempting and the equipment is ready, you don't need our approval. If you had said "I've never owned a boat"... that would be a different story. Again, is the equipment ready? Safety gear, radio, electronics? Do you know how to use everything (proficiently)?

Dave
 

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Nice boat and it sounds like a great trip, but I am confused, are you talking about single handing from NYC to Lake Champlain? That is over 300 miles and the mast will have to be unstepped and restepped, 12 locks to go through, and steering all the way, and plenty of navigation. Probably at least 5 or 6 days.

If it were me I would want at least one extra hand on a trip like this.
 

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If you are contemplating single handing, your biggest challenge IMHO will be close quarters handling and tying up to docks and locks. I'd bring someone with me that's agile and can follow orders for line handling/fenders, etc. Agility more important than experience.

The ocean/navigating part of this trip should be pretty straight forward, although the NJ coast doesn't have a lot of all weather harbor entrances. I've only sailed by the whole thing without stopping, I'm sure other sail netters have better advice on this. Be ultra conservative with the weather, particularly with a boat that's new to you. I'm assuming they taught you basic navigation, and things like big ships don't have brakes, etc. Lot's of ship traffic where you are headed.

It's very helpful that you are comfortable with the machinery.

Good luck w the new to you boat!
 

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What is your timeframe?
 

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Not crazy. The challenge will be the NJ coast but there are bailout points. An extra hand would be helpful and more fun. It's an easy trip but tedious at times.

Offer to take the PO. He may love it and you'll get a great indoctrination. On our last boat, I did a similar trip with the PO from Worton Creek to Phila. Just an idea.
 

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So just closed on a Morgan 382, spent last weekend with the previous owner on shakedown. Know most of the systems below and have been a mechanic in my younger days so the diesel was easy. The survey went well, some minor needs in the future but nothing of concern. She is in Rock Hall, Md and I want to sail or motor sail up through NYC to the Hudson final destination of Point Bay Marina in Lake Champlain. I have done the locks in a power boat previously and talked to the marina that will step the mast.
I have done the 101, sailed a day with a private instructor in San Francisco and less than 20 hours logged in the last few years. In the past owned a Star, a 12' cat and spent hundreds of hours having fun on the water. I have bought
all the charts and Pilot guides and plotted the route. Radar works well and I will add a new char tplotter before departure. I have purchased extra fuel filters, belts and clamps, have extra oil and water pump impellers. The Perkins 108 has less than 1700 hrs on it.
I am attempting to find a seasoned sailor to make the trip up with me as far as NYC then I feel I can handle it on up. Am I crazy to try this, should I just have it shipped?
Hell, having it shipped is what would be "Crazy"... :)

Sounds to me like your approach is appropriately cautious and sensible. The only potentially risky segment of the trip is the NJ coast, that's where you really need to exercise a bit of caution, and perhaps wait a bit for good, settled weather. Even with good radar, you want to make every effort to avoid encountering fog, especially on the upper reaches of the Chesapeake, Delaware Bay, and of course heading up the coast and into NY Harbor...

There are probably dozens of threads around here relative to that trip, poke around a bit for advice on catching a fair tide most of the way down Delaware Bay, and on thru NY Harbor and up the Hudson, etc...

Be sure you know with absolute certainty and precision your mast height, looks like your boat can make it thru the Cape May canal. You really want to avoid having to go around Cape May Point if at all possible...

You've done the locks before, so you know the drill there... One suggestion I'd make - assuming your boat's prop walk is to port - is to offset the rig slightly to starboard if possible. Taking the locks on the port wall will give you a bit more wiggle room, make it easier to bring the boat alongside the walls without risking making contact with either end of the stick...

Have fun, good luck with your new boat... You've made a great choice with the Morgan 382, that's a wonderful boat...
 

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You plan seems quite sensible except you'll probably need a hand passing through the locks but you are experienced enough to make that call yourself. The hop from Cape May to Sandy Hook should take about 19 hours. Expect a lot of construction activity near the Tappan Zee Bridge --120 barges and 35 tugs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Not attempting a single handed trip, I have a low experienced hand and have posted looking for an experienced hand (will cover expenses). I have reviewed all the bridges, the only close one will be in the Cape May canal and the previous owner told me he's been through with the boat twice, I will cross at low tide and wait to be sure there are no boat wakes. I have read a number of trip blogs and I know the longest of pushes will be the NJ coast. A friend has helped me load "marine weather" , "My Radar", I am using "Navionics" and like the current, tide and wind forecasting.
My schedule is fairly open, I am looking at a possible departure of around June 23rd and I am opening up 2 weeks of travel time, if I get somewhere and have to return I will park the boat and return later.
Safety equipment is aboard, I plan to harness in most of the time and always for any after dark hours. I am new to Radar but practicing with it during fair weather to get a good feel of how it looks when I can see. VHF is new but in my line of work I use UHF radios all the time, comfortable with basic communications.
Prop walk is to starboard in reverse, so your saying if I load up the Port water tank a bit, what is the effect? Was not aware of a forward walk but always learning.
 

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Not crazy at all.

I would say first take it out for one or two long daysails, to really shake it down. Think about an EPIRB at least and a float plan, in case you get in trouble. Life rafts are expensive but renting one for the trip might make sense, or at least have a dink that you can step up into.

The NJ coast in particular can be deceptive. Most of the inlets will be impassible if the wind and current are wrong, and in bad wx that happens regularly. Because the bottom is shallow for quite a ways off, long stretches are also very rough compared to standing off in deeper water. So, look for a weather window and assume you will not be able to duck into any inlet for shelter unless your timing is right.

Stay awake, look out for traffic (which is not always using their radar or keeping watch) and if you're aiming for the Ambrose Light, don't hit it. Every once in a while someone does.

Making landfall in the Big Apple is easy, day or night.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Sorry to keep asking for more info but I have read Eldridge and found some info on the C&D, read through the costal pilots on the route. I do not find a lot about small boat traffic other than be cautious in the canal for large shipping wake and a comment about hugging the west side of the narrows in New York harbor. Of course all the good info on tides and markers. Am I missing any other resource I should be reading? I have been combing the charts as well reading the notes and looking for any obstacles in my charted route.

Thanks all for the valuable info you have given already.
 

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dmoltz,

In my experience in the C&D, if you keep an eye out for the big ships, hug the side of the channel when they need to pass, you should be OK. I've also had luck hailing them to let them know I was down there. There might be a lot of small boat traffic going in and out of Chesapeake City depending on the time you go by.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The PO was going to make the trip but had to bail at the last minute, sailed with him last weekend, a great resource.
 

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So just closed on a Morgan 382, spent last weekend with the previous owner on shakedown. Know most of the systems below and have been a mechanic in my younger days so the diesel was easy. The survey went well, some minor needs in the future but nothing of concern. She is in Rock Hall, Md and I want to sail or motor sail up through NYC to the Hudson final destination of Point Bay Marina in Lake Champlain. I have done the locks in a power boat previously and talked to the marina that will step the mast.
I have done the 101, sailed a day with a private instructor in San Francisco and less than 20 hours logged in the last few years. In the past owned a Star, a 12' cat and spent hundreds of hours having fun on the water. I have bought all the charts and Pilot guides and plotted the route. Radar works well and I will add a new char tplotter before departure. I have purchased extra fuel filters, belts and clamps, have extra oil and water pump impellers. The Perkins 108 has less than 1700 hrs on it.
I am attempting to find a seasoned sailor to make the trip up with me as far as NYC then I feel I can handle it on up. Am I crazy to try this, should I just have it shipped?
If you feel confident in handling the mast yourself, Castleton Boat Club, just below Albany, has a big DIY gin pole you can rent and save some money. They are a great bunch of guys there and there's usually people to give you a hand. Make sure you carefully plan for current. I've done the trip many times and if you need info. just pm me.
 

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"hugging the west side of the narrows in New York harbor. "
That's a new one on me. It would have you heading against traffic that is coming out of the harbor, if you were inbound. Nuh-uh. The only special thing you would do in NY harbor, is what you would do anytime there is big heavy and fast traffic all mixed into a limited place: stay alert and follow the usual rules of the road.
Ignore the high speed commuter ferry catamarans that think they own the road, they don't. Batch of jamokes from the mainland.
The orange-and-navy Staten Island Ferries *do* own the harbor, because they are constrained by draft and often in shallower water than you might think. In fact, anything that is a ship, as opposed to a boat, probably is constrained by draft. NY is actually a fairly shallow harbor by modern standards.
 

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"hugging the west side of the narrows in New York harbor. "

Only thing comes to mind with above advice...in fog, limited visibility,
one might be suggesting you stay out of the shipping channels and in shallow
water away from the big boys and "most" traffic...but you can also stay in shallows
on the east side or even in between the shipping lanes.
Another point comes to mind, everyone and there brother is making way
for the same popular light, buoy...I try to offset way point by a reasonable distance
especially in a busy harbor.
 

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Can't give advice for your trip--sounds fun and I'm sure you'll be just fine--but a big Congrats on the purchase and welcome (soon) to your new cruising grounds on Lake Champlain. My boat was in Charlotte when I bought it (the Sailing Center, not Point Bay), and we've been on a mooring in South Hero for the last 3 summers. If you're ever looking for advice on cruising the Lake, especially the northern half--anchorages, marinas, whatever--feel free to send me a message. Be sure to make it up to the Inland Sea some day, easily one of the least crowded and most beautiful parts of the lake.

 
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