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Like many of you , since I have been young I had a dream to sail the seven seas chase the sun and the wind, but I wonder, after YOU took the big steps,with some of you quitting jobs, maybe even selling your home , does sailing day after day , month after month, year after year is REALLY a dream come true? or ,if asking it a bit different: is it STILL a dream come true after the honeymoon period ended, ? in hindsight, is it as you imagined it to be? do you have any regrets ? would you have done anything differently?
Thanks for your honest reply from far away, Down Under.
 

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Several years as a full time liveaboard, and we still cherish the experience. It was an adventure, and included tons of things happening. Some trying, some exciting, some painful - but it was LIVING, not dying a day at a time as many of us are doing.

Different every day, some times several times a day. Don't like the current view, sail an hour or so, and different perspective on everything. Don't like the (insert word here), raise the sails and move along.

I would have started earlier, by a couple of decades, even with a smaller, less capable boat. Especially now, that you can buy a kindle and an iPod and have the best of technology, with no damage to the books/cds/tapes and the like.
 

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MikeGuyver
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You'll get a different opinion from every member, we may agree on some things, but not all.
I, for one, after 4 years aboard, find myself wondering occasionally what the hell am I doing here. But, it doesn't last long and then I wake up and find myself in my version of heaven on earth.
I have never in my 65 years on earth seen any group of people as wonderful and diverse as sailors. This has been a mind expanding experience.
If you find the right bride, the honeymoon will never end.
 

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Boat Bum
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I've been at it for 8 years now and it's a great life for me.
Theres always something to do, fishing, reading, sailing, fixing the damn boat, drinking with my friends, kayaking, fixing the damn boat..........
The traveling is nice even though I'm not a "real" cruiser. If you have portable hobbies you'll never be bored and if you are then you've got time to fix the damn boat
 

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..... If you have portable hobbies you'll never be bored and if you are then you've got time to fix the damn boat
I have difficulty getting through a single chapter in (even a good) book when I'm sitting on deck... too many things to observe, notice, admire..

We have been sailing since 1981. We don't liveaboard/cruise full time but we have spent up to 8 weeks at a time onboard for the past 12 summers. Every time we depart we think we'll come back early to take in some 'city summer' stuff.. hasn't happened yet.
 

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Do it now - don't wait till you are too damned old, like I did. My sailing adventures didn't begin until 8 years ago, and now, at age 75, health issues are plaguing me, which may curtail my ability to sail more than another year or two.

All the best,

Gary :cool:
 

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Do it now - don't wait till you are too damned old, like I did. My sailing adventures didn't begin until 8 years ago, and now, at age 75, health issues are plaguing me, which may curtail my ability to sail more than another year or two.

All the best,

Gary :cool:
As someone who has always looked at the boats in the harbor and said I'm going to do that as soon as "the time is right". I'm now retired and have the money to do it but may no longer have the health. If you wait till the time is right the window may pass you by.
 

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These look like they stopped adding new stories a few years ago, but I used to like reading them. You'll note, if you scan through them, most return to shore after a handful of years. That's not to say they didn't love every minute, only that it doesn't typically last forever.

The INTERVIEW WITH A CRUISER Project
 

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Unless you try living your dream, you will never know. I'm 2 years away from casting off. Want to do it before I turn 60. Will not have too much money, but enough for a decent 30 foot boat and several years of frugal cruising. Regardless of how much money I do have at the time, I will not delay, even if I have to get a smaller boat and live on rice and beans for the next 5 years. And if it does not work out, I will adjust, as always. Have no fear.
 

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I just got home from plowing slushy miserable snow all night.
Casting off when this last big plowing contract is done.
Summer time it's humping granite or limestone up scaffolding to build chimneys and fireplaces.
Anything has to be an improvement!
If I get fed up of sailing I'll come back to Canada and buy another house on one of the coasts. Will never move back to the area I'm in now, would move anyway if I wasn't going sailing.
 

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I'll offer the counter perspective.

We sail a lot, but we never sailed away. I thought I might at one point, we spent 13 weeks aboard, about week 11 I was ready to get off. Now we daysail and cruise for many weeks every summer, frequently charter someplace warm in the winter. We like the balance in that. Not everyone's desires, or even personal situation is right for leaving land based life behind. There are implications, including family, work, and friends to sailing away. Not to mention the everyday conveniences we take for granted on land like a long hot shower, provisioning without getting in a dingy, and when's the last time your house slipped anchor during a storm? Make sure you know how you prioritize these things before committing to the dream. Particularly the value you place on the proximity of family and friends, and how you value your work. It works for many, but not for all. And I think everyone, even those who sail away would agree it's not exactly what you imagine it to be, for some it's something better, and for some it's something worse.

Everyone's dream is different. Make sure you really know what your dream is before you do anything you cannot easily reverse.

I suggest that if you think that sailing away for a long period or even forever might be good for you, you try it for an extended period before you sell the farm.

YMMV, in in this case everyone's mileage is different.
 

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bell ringer
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I've read and believe that whether you like long term cruising depends on how tied to land life you are via family, friends etc. If you have an active land life spending a lot of time with family, friends, clubs or other social and emotional support functions you will have a hard time leaving. But if you don't really have a close support group you adapt to cruising pretty easy.
 

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Do it now - don't wait till you are too damned old, like I did. My sailing adventures didn't begin until 8 years ago, and now, at age 75, health issues are plaguing me, which may curtail my ability to sail more than another year or two.

All the best,

Gary :cool:
To balance out my previous post, IMHO Gary has it exactly right. If it is for you, the time is now.

No one knows what the future holds for any of us. Gary's got a few extra years on me, but I can hear the clock ticking, and all though sailing away for good isn't the answer for me, IMHO delaying the bucket list is a sure way not to experience it.
 

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Like many of you , since I have been young I had a dream to sail the seven seas chase the sun and the wind, but I wonder, after YOU took the big steps,with some of you quitting jobs, maybe even selling your home , does sailing day after day , month after month, year after year is REALLY a dream come true? or ,if asking it a bit different: is it STILL a dream come true after the honeymoon period ended, ? in hindsight, is it as you imagined it to be? do you have any regrets ? would you have done anything differently?
Thanks for your honest reply from far away, Down Under.
Great questions. I had the bug at a young age and we took a year off from work, rented the house. We left the door open to continue longer, if we found that was our desire.

Toward the end of the year, we were both ready to 'get off'. We loved the experience. In hindsight, we were both changed - for the better - by our year away on the boat. That change was more of a renewed vigor for life, on land and on the sea. At the end, we hit the ground running.

I think we both discovered how much we loved sailing, especially along coasts, for the travel aspect(travel we have a passion for) and natural beauty and quality of life it is.

And so we continued sailing - seasonally - even after going back to work, home. Now, we went farther from home, began leaving the boat in different parts along the east coast. Eventually, we sailed into the area we now live(then with 2 babies aboard).

Where we are(today) geographically and mentally(happily so), may be partly a continuation of that year off sailing.

Here's what I discovered I wasn't crazy about: Making a boat a semi permanent home. It's just me, but the process of making a sailboat into a home takes away some of the essence of what makes a sailboat
a traveling, moveable feast(Hemmingway?).

Coastal sailing gives me all the good parts of that year off. We sail more of our miles now with less stringent schedules. Getting on the boat for a few weeks or days is a lighter experience. We're underway fast, our boats simple amenities(small berths, tiny galley, head, cockpit), give us a real break from our 'home' on shore(and the stresses of everyday life).

Sailing is a way of life for us which we've continued(as a family) year after year. It's not all of life (for us) but looking back and with grown children, sailing was and is a very big part of our lives. We hope to do longer seasonal sails in the future.
 

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It's a freaking nightmare mate! What with all the islands we've run into, hostile natives, USA at war with half the world, broken bits on the boat, world financial crisis, fellow cruisers being shot and killed,school shootings, I phones having to be hacked, parents and friends passing away, residency in a few foreign countries,2nd passports, lifetime of adventure and adventures of a lifetime..Nope If I were you I'd just sit home and live a quiet life of desperation...
 

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Yep it's terrible out there,I feet put upon when another boat comes into my Anchorage..alas when traveling u must put up with a lot.lol for me life is a slick sailing mag cover...the sights one sees on the blue horizon...nothing can compare with a meaningful conversation with a group of Wales or dolfins.even the mola can have something to add cheers and dream on
 

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Like most things in life, if it were easy, everyone would be doing it!

On the other hand, you’ll never know till you do it.

It can be trying at times, lonely at others, but endless sunsets, meeting fellow cruisers and sharing stories, swimming with the dolphins, rays, manatees and listening to waves lap at your hull while you drift off to sleep will cure just about anyone’s woes.

No regrets! …..yet…..:)
 

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No doubt you laughed as you wrote this, but if I were to sell my house and live with my wife in a relatively tiny cabin - giving up land, family ties and comforts.......hoo boy, that could be rough!
Funny. This is exactly what all of our non-sailing friends say about my wife and I spending a two week cruise together. None of them can imagine being in a small confined space with their spouses.

Not an issue at all for us. Sure, any two people have things that get on each others nerves from time to time, but the size of the space has zero impact.

If anything, we're both just generally happier on the water.
 
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