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Living the dream of sailing away (or any other life style dream) is not free. It must be funded somehow. And there comes the day, for most, where age and health issues will require moving back ashore, and at this point, most are too old or too sick to get a job or start a career that will provide the funds needed in old age. Ignore the issue of finances or underestimate the amount needed, not just now, but also for later years, and people could find themselves in a hard existence for the last quarter to half of their life.
 

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Discussion Starter #42 (Edited)
During our cruising we met many people who you will not see posting here. They are boat prisoners. They sold out and cast off with no bail out plan!!! I felt sorry for them. We talked to a number of them and they were very tired of boat living, but had no way to re-establish a shore side place! Some had kids with no health insurance. One kid in his teens was sick and needed a doctor, what to do???

If you have a house, DO NOT SELL IT, rent it out. Have a bailout plan!!!!

Just my views!!!
Greg

Thank you for your advice Greg. I did felt that some point of view was missing here all along, and as one of the bloger mentioned already , I'll not see here a reply from those who are not enjoy it anymore. I do have a property and I can't see the logic of selling it when it can generate me a steady income, although small, but better than nothing, and as well, as a safe place to land back if/when the s**t hit the fan.

Thanks from down under.
 

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<SNIP>

Thank you for your advice Greg. I did felt that some point of view was missing here all along, <SNIP>

Thanks from down under.
Glad it added to the info. We love it and most do, but I always like to bring up the other side. Of about 7 or 8 couples who departed the same time we did, 3 were done at about the 1 year or less mark. :crying at this point, I know that 2 are now living aboard in Mexico, not sailing at all. We are the last couple still going places on our boat.

I have seen a lot of people do the sell out & cast off thing. MANY of them did not make the first year! I think it was partly due to trying to schedule that departure! And lack of cruising experience. Selling out is easy if you are not financing the cruising with the money for it. So, head out and if it fits, then sell out. OR, BETTER YET, as you confirmed, rent and keep a bit of funding coming in. That way you have something to come back to and funding to keep going, BOTH!

If you start off easy, sailing in nice weather and building on experience slowly, it will work out fine. You are building confidence in your boat AND yourself. I have heard others cruisers say about a crossing of some type, "If that had been my first crossing, it would have been my last!" We had a full knock down half way down the Baja about 50 miles off shore. A rouge wave hit us directly on the beam. The top of the wave actually was over the boom. We were both in the cockpit, clipped in, so all was OK. BUT, if that had happened during the first off shore trip, it would most likely have been our last! :|

Good luck and make it a great experience!!

Greg
 

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I still don't understand the need to hold on to "stuff" in case of needing to come back to the "stuff". You can always get more "stuff" so there is no need to be taking care of "stuff" you aren't currently using.

I bet holding onto the "stuff" is really more a mental security blanket.

But I also bet for most people it is the "stuff" that is holding them back back start with.
 

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I still don't understand the need to hold on to "stuff" in case of needing to come back to the "stuff". You can always get more "stuff" so there is no need to be taking care of "stuff" you aren't currently using.

I bet holding onto the "stuff" is really more a mental security blanket.

But I also bet for most people it is the "stuff" that is holding them back back start with.
Stuff is just stuff, it has come and gone many time in my life. Even the boat is just stuff. I want to use my stuff to make memory's, for myself, for my family, for my friends. If stuff gets in the way of that, I get rid of the stuff. When I leave this place, I don't get to take my stuff, so I'll leave it to my kids, no cash, just cool stuff. It's only the memory's that I leave behind that have any real value anyway.
 

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If you have a house, DO NOT SELL IT, rent it out. Have a bailout plan!!!!
This is the most important statement in the thread. We are now in our mid-60's and have been cruising for 9 years. We know several couples, where one partner has developed serious medical problems including Alzheimers, who had everything tied up in a depreciated boat.

While cruising is a great lifestyle I do not believe it is worth spending the last 10 years of your life in poverty!

Phil
 

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This is the most important statement in the thread. We are now in our mid-60's and have been cruising for 9 years. We know several couples, where one partner has developed serious medical problems including Alzheimers, who had everything tied up in a depreciated boat.

While cruising is a great lifestyle I do not believe it is worth spending the last 10 years of your life in poverty!
Phil
This whole line of thought confuses me. Why is a dirt dwelling so important? Couldn't any couple or individual 'return' and live on their boat in a nice marina? It would even allow a few days of sailing with friends or a bit of snow birding if the weather wasn't up to par. Never mind the ability to pack up and move to a better or more convenient location without ever packing a box or bag. Why does one have to own a house?
To the best of my knowledge, taxes on a boat as a primary residence are far and away less than any dirt dwelling. Certainly utilities would be a lot less on a boat.
I haven't met too many folks cruising who can say they are actually realizing a useful income from renting their home. Covering expenses, yes, but if one needs a management company to insure that the home will remain in good condition, then not so much.
Most of us wouldn't want to pay the rent on a place, let's just say in Charleston SC's waterfront district, yet you could probably live in the City Marina there for under a grand a month on most cruising boats. Don't like marinas? I've always been able to find a very reasonable liveaboard dock behind someone's house, after a few months in an area.
So, especially if the returning couple's finances are a bit restrictive, what's the big deal about having a place on land? Stay in the home you've known and loved for those wonderful years of cruising. Let the kids worry about it's market value when they sell it.
 

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I still don't understand the need to hold on to "stuff" in case of needing to come back to the "stuff". You can always get more "stuff" so there is no need to be taking care of "stuff" you aren't currently using.

I bet holding onto the "stuff" is really more a mental security blanket.

But I also bet for most people it is the "stuff" that is holding them back back start with.
So, you would throw away those photos of your first child? Or, for me, my 1946 Harley Davidson Knucklehead? Or items your grand parents left you?

When we departed we rented out our house. It now is a money generating item. We packed our "stuff" into a mobile storage unit that was taken off and stored in a climate controlled place, then delivered to a place we moved to when we had our family emergency. AND oh by the way, emergency's do come up back home:eek. What then?

Greg
 

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So, you would throw away those photos of your first child? Or, for me, my 1946 Harley Davidson Knucklehead? Or items your grand parents left you?

When we departed we rented out our house. It now is a money generating item. We packed our "stuff" into a mobile storage unit that was taken off and stored in a climate controlled place, then delivered to a place we moved to when we had our family emergency. AND oh by the way, emergency's do come up back home:eek. What then?

Greg
A 1946 knucklehead? Thats a dream bike, very cool. Any pics you could share? I'd love to see her!
Here's one of my dad on his 1946 45" Flathead. Thought you might enjoy. I ride a 2007 FLHX myself.
 

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I think this topic is like many here. It comes down to "each to their own" . If you plan for the future you wish to have, all is possible. If you don't than you get whatever life hands you, usually not good.
I'm at a point that I want to shave down, lighten up on unnecessary stuff, simplify my life. A good boat, my H.D. parked in my daughters garage, a beater truck to leave at the marina (it's going to rust out anyway lol). I'm finding it very freeing. But I also have a back up plan and set aside financing to do it, if I find it necessary.
 

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"So, you would throw away those photos of your first child? Or, for me, my 1946 Harley Davidson Knucklehead? Or items your grand parents left you?

When we departed we rented out our house. It now is a money generating item. We packed our "stuff" into a mobile storage unit that was taken off and stored in a climate controlled place, then delivered to a place we moved to when we had our family emergency. AND oh by the way, emergency's do come up back home. What then?

Greg"

Don't fool yourself, I've spent two years throwing away a lifetimes worth of "treasures" my mom should have done something with if she didn't want to end up as landfill.
Keeping the house only makes sense if you have every intention of returning to the same place, Personally I will make more off dividends investing my house money that I would ever be able to get as rental income once that money is taxed and I lose potential capitol gains if I decide to sell the house without living in it for over a year.
If things go even sort of close to plan I will actually come back with more money than I left with!
 

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And just WHY would I need a house to keep those? I have kids etc that can store a box or two of "stuff". After all in a few years it will be theirs.
Seen that MANY times from cruisers, in MOST of the cases it did NOT work out and was just a major problem and a lot of arguments among the family.

As I said, I stored our stuff in a mobile container and stored. The house, In California, started making a small amount of money (NET after the agency) right away! And now it adds quite a bit to the kitty.

Selling out all, OR waiting to go till you are absolutely ready are BOTH poor planning!

Greg
 

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A 1946 knucklehead? Thats a dream bike, very cool. Any pics you could share? I'd love to see her!
Here's one of my dad on his 1946 45" Flathead. Thought you might enjoy. I ride a 2007 FLHX myself.

TO COOL photo!

I don't have a current photo as it's covered up and still preserved in safe storage from when we headed out cruising. This is a shot going into the box for storage, covered in preservative. Plans are to take it back to original shape (not original parts). I am after all a "geezer". Plan to ride it, dressed in old time gear, with my son. I have a 1967 Sportster XLH for him to ride. Just have to put that one back together for him.

Greg
 

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I appreciate everyone's thoughts on this! My wife and are just in the beginning stages of the "dream"

We are still a long way out from any type of "departure date", heck we are still looking for boat #1 ( a trailerable sailboat). After reading along in this thread and also in several books I think the key is having options. Being stuck in anything stinks, whether its on land or on a boat. For me, being able to make choices is huge. And to be able to make choices means being prepared. Finances are a huge part of that....

On the other hand, I watched my dad prepare his whole life. Worked his ass off and saved. When he retired, he had plenty of fund, more than he will ever spend. Then his health started to go. He never did get to launch his dream. He ended up switching from a sailboat to an RV so all wasn't lost and he still got to get out and enjoy his retirement.

RJ
 

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I appreciate everyone's thoughts on this! My wife and are just in the beginning stages of the "dream"

We are still a long way out from any type of "departure date", heck we are still looking for boat #1 ( a trailerable sailboat). After reading along in this thread and also in several books I think the key is having options. Being stuck in anything stinks, whether its on land or on a boat. For me, being able to make choices is huge. And to be able to make choices means being prepared. Finances are a huge part of that....

On the other hand, I watched my dad prepare his whole life. Worked his ass off and saved. When he retired, he had plenty of fund, more than he will ever spend. Then his health started to go. He never did get to launch his dream. He ended up switching from a sailboat to an RV so all wasn't lost and he still got to get out and enjoy his retirement.

RJ
GOOD ON YA!!!! You are approaching it the correct way (my point of view)!
When we were looking for a boat we were working and a ways away from, and a long time from casting off. We thought over the idea of a larger (40 +/-) boat, but were inland at the time. We were worried about getting it to the sea if I was laid off. We thought about a small trailer sailor. but if we got laid off we would not be able to finance a larger boat without a job. :|

We settled on a trailer-able boat that could also circumnavigate. Worked GREAT for us. So far we have sailed lakes, the west coast Seattle, then from the San Francisco Bay area down through the Sea of Cortes and mainland Mexico. We have trailed back to the Bay area, then to New Orleans (and returned to the Phoenix area a few times) and sailed the West coast of Florida. Getting ready to head out to the Bahamas soon.

A side note, we have had 4 serious offers to trade straight across for boats from 36 to 41 Ft. STILL love our boat. You can see some of our adventures on our WEB pages and Youtube pages. And 5 DVD that are for sale.

DO IT with a plan!! :cut_out_animated_em

Greg
 

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TO COOL photo!

I don't have a current photo as it's covered up and still preserved in safe storage from when we headed out cruising. This is a shot going into the box for storage, covered in preservative. Plans are to take it back to original shape (not original parts). I am after all a "geezer". Plan to ride it, dressed in old time gear, with my son. I have a 1967 Sportster XLH for him to ride. Just have to put that one back together for him.

Greg
AMAZING BIKE!!!! original hard tail with molded in sidecar loops intact I would say. She look's like she rolled right out of 1960's SoCal chopper shop. You have a very unique bike there. I'm rather envious, lol. and a 67 ironhead? very cool. I really like the plans you have with your son, just awesome! Thank you for sharing your pic! If you don't mind I'd like to save to my bike pic file?
 

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AMAZING BIKE!!!! original hard tail with molded in sidecar loops intact I would say. She look's like she rolled right out of 1960's SoCal chopper shop. You have a very unique bike there. I'm rather envious, lol. and a 67 ironhead? very cool. I really like the plans you have with your son, just awesome! Thank you for sharing your pic! If you don't mind I'd like to save to my bike pic file?
No problem saving it.
Yes, did not mod the frame at all. Plan to knock off th molding and maybe even get a sidecar some time. :wink

Greg
 

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Like many of you , since I have been young I had a dream to sail the seven seas chase the sun and the wind, but I wonder, after YOU took the big steps,with some of you quitting jobs, maybe even selling your home , does sailing day after day , month after month, year after year is REALLY a dream come true? or ,if asking it a bit different: is it STILL a dream come true after the honeymoon period ended, ? in hindsight, is it as you imagined it to be? do you have any regrets ? would you have done anything differently?
Thanks for your honest reply from far away, Down Under.


My hubby and I are in our 8th year living aboard full time after selling all out... I turned 40 our first year cruising. No poor planning involved, just the opposite. Worked out finances to be covered for catastrophic events and the long haul. It's all about choices and is obviously a personal thing.

Simplifying was a very liberating process and just like being debt-free, not having any storage or property freed us up to be self-sufficient. Cruising as daily life includes sailing, travel, occasional thrills, hard work, social times, quiet times. There is no right or wrong way to do it as there is no right or wrong way to live.

After the first WOW year, the second year was the hardest in terms of making the full transition and getting comfortable with your evolving personal identity. Perhaps a retirement issue in general but it happens.

We now have more connection with family and friends then we did when working (no kids). The internet helps tremendously, but we also found that yearly visits are a good few weeks' "vacation" for us, quality time with family and a complete change of scenery from the boat is good to re-charge. We also started to explore extended land travel for several weeks in the countries we visit as another way of broadening our experiences away from the sea.

When we sail to areas that we enjoy, we like stay for extended time (~months to years) to fully enjoy them. So far there are two such places for us ~ our ideal place includes lots of underwater life, daily water time, seclusion and self-sufficiency, no stores, cars, shoes... etc ;) That said, we also enjoy visiting cities and have been charmed to visit these ports even when the waters are less inviting.

This works for us and we intend to do it as long as we still enjoy it. We take our time and hope to slowly extend our cruising grounds to other oceans. It helps that we recognize what we enjoy (or not) so we can make our choices about cruising destinations, but have to try not to be too fixated on pre-conceived ideas because some places end up surprising us ~ in a good way!
 

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So very well said!!!

my hubby and i are in our 8th year living aboard full time after selling all out... I turned 40 our first year cruising. No poor planning involved, just the opposite. Worked out finances to be covered for catastrophic events and the long haul. It's all about choices and is obviously a personal thing.

Simplifying was a very liberating process and just like being debt-free, not having any storage or property freed us up to be self-sufficient. Cruising as daily life includes sailing, travel, occasional thrills, hard work, social times, quiet times. There is no right or wrong way to do it as there is no right or wrong way to live.

After the first wow year, the second year was the hardest in terms of making the full transition and getting comfortable with your evolving personal identity. Perhaps a retirement issue in general but it happens.

We now have more connection with family and friends then we did when working (no kids). The internet helps tremendously, but we also found that yearly visits are a good few weeks' "vacation" for us, quality time with family and a complete change of scenery from the boat is good to re-charge. We also started to explore extended land travel for several weeks in the countries we visit as another way of broadening our experiences away from the sea.

When we sail to areas that we enjoy, we like stay for extended time (~months to years) to fully enjoy them. So far there are two such places for us ~ our ideal place includes lots of underwater life, daily water time, seclusion and self-sufficiency, no stores, cars, shoes... Etc ;) that said, we also enjoy visiting cities and have been charmed to visit these ports even when the waters are less inviting.

This works for us and we intend to do it as long as we still enjoy it. We take our time and hope to slowly extend our cruising grounds to other oceans. It helps that we recognize what we enjoy (or not) so we can make our choices about cruising destinations, but have to try not to be too fixated on pre-conceived ideas because some places end up surprising us ~ in a good way!
 
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