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My wife and sons I went down to LA and San Diego to look at boats, we got aboard quite a number of boats . What we learned is what we don't want , the only boat we saw that really struck us as being right for us was a pearson 422. We did look at three kelly Peterson 44's , the general design was OK but the boat never really struck us as "the one" however it has most of our requirements with the least amount of compromises. Neither my wife or I am thrilled about the boat. We do recognize that it will fit most of our needs and we don't hate it ( actually I like it) we realize that it will not be our last boat and it will serve us properly.

Is it wise to buy a boat that you don't love but will do what you need it to ?
 

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That is a great question! Sorta ran into the same thing with a Pearson 32 that is in great shape and in the price range. But, enhh . . .

If you have the $$ I say hold out. I am curious to what the wizened will say though.
 

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Love isn't always at first sight. Sounds like your appreciation of the boat is quite rational and might be more enduring than an appreciation based solely on emotion. Sail one than see how you feel. It might bring you closer or might turn you off the thing entirely. Look at it from different angles or google the heck out of it and read every related article and post and look at every picture. It suits your needs and it just might grow on you!

Good luck!
 

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Generally, no. That said, you might want to spend some time with the boat and see if she grows on you. As yotphix said, it might bring you closer or turn you off entirely...either way it will make your decision easier. Having a boat you don't love makes using it and sailing it a bit tougher.
 

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Ya gotta love your boat. There is too much work to be done on a boat and if you don't love her you'll resent every minute. KMC when you find THE BOAT you'll know and all work will be a labour of love.
 

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It depends on the boat, like with people. Two people that I love the most right now I could barely stand when I first met them. Tough, opinionated, cantankerous, mirror images of me. It took several years, but now I value them above all others. This boat could be similar, it may take time to appreciate her.

If you can sail on this boat try it, or other models of the same. Its good that you are finding out what you dont want, you're way ahead of others that I have seen. Meanwhile google all you can on her. I am in a similar position right now, looked at a number of boats, gradually narrowing them down, I know some things I do want and some I dont, that helps.

How does your family feel about her?
 

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You gota love it. We almost purchased a Person 30. It was in immaculate condition and a great boat but when we looked at the Tartan...we simply loved it...and still do! Good luck with your dilemma
 

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Been there done that...started looking for our next boat shortly after taking possession. Moved to our current boat within the same year.
Not that I am saying this will happen to you …….
 

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when reality strikes ... another vote for practical

I "love" my husband and the liveaboard/cruising/sailing lifestyle. I "like" the boat that gets me there. So maybe its just semantics but no, I don't think you have to "love" your boat and it's okay to buy one that's merely "right."

The boat I'd most "love" is so grotesequely (sp?) out of my price range that buying it would make the rest of the dream impossible. Sometimes you have to settle - pick the features that matter most (you said the boat will meet your needs) and compromise on the rest if necessary. Humans are pretty adaptable creatures and when your boat is away from the sensory overload of all the other features on the surrounding boats you may see it differently.

If nothing else, you said this isn't your forever boat so if you don't "love" it just learn a lot and it'll be easier to part with when the time comes.
 

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You should love the boat you buy but you don't really have to. Case in point, I bought a new boat (B393) nearly three years ago. It was nice but I really didn't love it. I bought it for a specific purpose - to go cruising each winter. It has served me well and I really like it but the boat I love is the one that I've had for 18 years (CS36M). I still have it and love it except when I come home from cruising and see all the work ahead of me on the "old" boat. Then I nearly hate it but I really don't as I've kept it. Sometimes in a weak moment I talk about selling it but I know I won't. She's on the hard now, just painted her bottom for next spring. Looks really great, wouldn't think she was 18 years old.
 

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Only you can weigh this decision sujectivly and assign the values of how much better you like the otherboat, how much out of budget, how much better this one meets the needs.
 

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eryka said:
I "love" my husband and the liveaboard/cruising/sailing lifestyle. I "like" the boat that gets me there. The boat I'd most "love" is so grotesequely (sp?) out of my price range that buying it would make the rest of the dream impossible. Sometimes you have to settle - pick the features that matter most (you said the boat will meet your needs) and compromise on the rest if necessary. Humans are pretty adaptable creatures and when your boat is away from the sensory overload of all the other features on the surrounding boats you may see it differently.

If nothing else, you said this isn't your forever boat so if you don't "love" it just learn a lot and it'll be easier to part with when the time comes.
eryka..oh you voice of reason....
unless you happen to have an unlimited budget ( none of my circle of friends fall in this group), and can buy even a "previously sailed" boat of your dreams, you have to make a few compromises. that being said, don't buy a boat you hate cuz you can afford it (i mean really, naysmitj was running around on his boat just after he bought her...poor girl...), i really, really like my sabre..i would love a hinckley or a swan...and when i flip through the sailing mags, i stop and imagine...but reality sets in and i know i don't have that kind of jack..so i remind myself that my boat is fun..paid for and not quite perfect, but it is mine, and i can still get out there and sail her and enjoy the experience. and as always..sail what you like, and like what you sail...
 

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I'm with Eryka...I've only loved my first boat (Catalina 22) and my present boat (Tayana 52). All the others were compromises that made sense for our budget and our needs at the time and we were HAPPY on each.
The 422's are nice boats (and rare on the market) and should serve you well and get you out on the water and be quite easy to sell when the perfect boat comes along. You don't say what it is that you DON'T like about the boat so I assume there is nothing major wrong other than that "new car" feeling. I say go for it!
 

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Cam and Sam - thanx, practicality has its place, doesn't mean I don't still look at the Gozzards et al at the boat shows!

Cam's post inspired me to think about our first boat, and Erickson 27 that we thought was the end of the rainbow. (at least till we learned enough to know what we really wanted longterm) But now I realize that most of my fondest memories are of anchorages and people and sunrises over the water, not about the teak and fiberglass and canvas that got us there.
 

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Eryka - well said (again!)

We have owned 5 rather different boats over the last 25 years, and can say that we seriously liked them all, at different times, for different reasons. All our boats had decent "lines" and were easy to look at, as they say. In addition they served our needs of the time well.

Our current boat, downsized from the last, is meeting our present needs too, as "empty nesters" needing easy handling and good accomodation for extended coastal cruising. Is she perfect? no - smallish cockpit and slightly underpowered - but just the same we are very satisfied with her at this time.

But -and to your point - what really sticks is the years and years of good memories, places visited, people met, children growing into competent sailors and avid cruisers themselves.... and these memories really don't depend on the boat itself - just the access to one.
 

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indecision is your worst enemy

If I may extrapolate from "Pig"s point --

The OP didn't say that budget was necessarily the only limiting factor. Perhaps a sense of keep looking till you find the 'right' one? Analysis paralysis????

When I worked for the Army I wanted to wait till all the data was in before spending taxpayer dollars and my boss used to tell me, "Make a decision, even if it's wrong." At first I thought he was being cynical but he explained that standby time costs money too. Do something, then learn from it and move on.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks all for the thoughtfull replies.

I should say that I don't hate the boat, in fact there are quite alot of things that I very much like.

the boat in question is a Kelly Peterson 44, the things I don't like are; The walkthrough is so small , the head does not have a separate shower, the galley is kind of short on counter space , the companionway is very steep and I wonder if it isn't a bit of a hazard going below when underway, The master bunk is designed so somebody has to climb over someone to get out of bed ,or else wait until the other gets upand I have never really liked the look of center cockpits.

the things I do like ; The boat is capable of going anywhere in the world , It is well built and able to withstand some minor mishaps without major damage . The KP44's have a superb reputation ,everything I have read about them has been positive ,with the exception of fuel and water tank problems and possibly poor wiring. most if not all of these problems will be solved on the boat I buy. They are fast for a cruising boat . The aft cabin is large and due to it's location is very private. the engine room is spacious and there is lots of room for add on's. The cockpit is large . The aft deck alows an extra space for storage , fishing , suntanning or what have you.Ample headroom( I am 6'2). Lots of storage for provisions and all the toy's that come along with two active and curious boys. They have high bullworks sp? and a large uncluttered fordeck. They are heavy and will take the sea's well. the draft is 6'4" while not shoal draft it is not going to be too prohibitive. It's safe . Oh yea ,I can afford it.

Allthough I don't love the boat I love what it is capable of and where it can take us .

Thanks for the replies ,I would love to hear anything else ya'll might have to say

KC
 

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Yes I did make an assumption that budget was the limiting factor on prefered boat, but perhaps the difference is merely preference over meeting requirements.
 
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