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purveyor of mischief
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i'm going to try to be as diplomatic as possible, but absent buying a floating condo, some of the trade-offs are well..just that. steep companionways usually mean lots of headroom below. separate shower/head combinations mean you sacrifice space elsewhere. as a chef, i doubt there is a sailing cook that wouldn't want more galley space..but..you compromise here and try to be efficient in your prep and cooking. i don't even know what to say about the bed situation..unless you buy a gunboat or something and have a monster stateroom, just be quiet or have the person who usually gets up first sleep on the outside of the berth ...
i say buy sturdy and built for your needs and sailing plans for the near term.
this is probably an indelicate and wholly inappropriate question...but how old are you, and what is your sailing experience...the only reason i ask.."the going down below while underway and steep companionway" aspect set off alarm bells for some reason..or maybe i should just myob and go back to painting trim in my gym...:D
 

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I would go with that nagging feeling you have inside that says "BUY IT" or "DON"T BUY". The perfect boat doesn't exist, but you know what your hot buttons are. The admiral and I recently looked at a boat we wanted to like, a Beneteau 38s5. It looked great on paper and is well recommended. We found so many things about the design of the boat that bugged us, the boat itself was in very nice condition. We talked about it all day after seeing it, but when we got up the next morning we both agreed it was the wrong boat, the "DON"T BUY" was clear.

There is just no substitute for looking at lots of boats. We use reason to narrow the choices but when it comes down to it it's feeling that make the sale.

Let us know what you decide.
 

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Super Fuzzy Moderator
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Before we bought Raven I fell head over heals with an advertisement. Kept the images on my desktop for months but because she was some 1500km from where we live it took a while to get to see the actual boat. I was a touch disappointed by the reality while my partner simply came up with a couple of irrefutable arguments a to why not. She was absolutely correct but I still love that boat and still keep a photo of her in my screensaver file.
Then when we finally found Raven I was definitely not in love. She is steel and smaller than I wanted but madam was happy and I was sick and tired of looking. We test sailed her in light airs and she seemed ok but after we owned her and had sailed her a couple of times I was almost inconsolable. Never had I sailed a boat that was such a pig in anything over 15 knots. No wonder the seller told me he rarely used more than one sail. Two up it was like a major arm wrestle and I was losing every time.
So we completely retuned the rig. Started from scratch, did it by the textbook with a lot of help from a sailmaker and a mate who seriously knows his stuff re rigs. Result ? Not hard to guess the answer, no more weather helm, better pointing ability, greater speed in all conditions although while she will never be a light air screamer she makes, shall we say, stately progress. Now when we are out and it starts to blow, I just feel like wrapping her up and giving her a big hug she feels so good. When we leave her I always give her a pat on the bum and a big thankyou. She is most definitely my other woman. Love is not always at first sight.

Andrew
 

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Owner, Green Bay Packers
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What's love got to do with it?

I've been waiting to see some of the responses to this thread, and have ended up with the same nagging thought as sanctuarysam. That being said, here's my two cents:
Which vintage car would you rather own? A Mazda RX-7 or a Jaguar E-type? Having been there I can say that the Mazda is the far better car for 98% of my driving and proved to be quite nice in all aspects. But, then I'd just look at the Jag and remember the few times the SU carbs were tuned just right, of course forgetting about wipers that don't work in the rain, head lights that don't work nights, and a heater box that par-boils your foot until it rusts out. Depends on where you're at right now. Single/no obligations-Jag. Married/expected to actually be someplace on time-Mazda.
Boats, like sports cars, are not a necessity and so different ones make sense at different times. Some men actually carry this thinking into the realm of relations with the fairer sex, but I wouldn't go there myself.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Thanks for the replies .

sanctuarysam to answer your question my wife and I are both in out late thirties and in good health. When I wrote about the steep companionway I was talking specifically about the KP44, the bottom half is a vertical ladder. So copared to other boats I have been on and sailed I would call it steeper than average. Our sailing experience is limited to lake sailing in our 21 foot daysailer for the last five years. We have taken courses and bareboated as well. We recognize that we are novices to some extent, and will hire an instructor to teach us our new boat for the first week or as long as we need to feel confident.

Thanks to everybody that responded I believe I can live with the boat and feel that after we have "bonded" I will learn to love her.
 

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Telstar 28
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Kmclarke-

I hope the sea trial and survey go well...if so, good luck and I hope you grow to love the boat... a boat that isn't loved is often not sailed or maintained anywhere near as well as one that is loved.
 

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eryka is better of loving her husband and simply liking her boat than to have it the other way around. I am sure ideally you would want to love the boat too.

It's probably easier to get a divorce than it is to sell an unloved boat. It would stay on the market for a long time and be a constant pain the arse....well come to think of it, so would an ex-wife I suppose.
 

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As a long time real estate broker and sailor I have this final bit of advice on how to proceed ( I have helped people with much larger purchases than this by using this method).
step one. Look at a couple more boats on the short list, JUST A COUPLE
step two. Put away all info about boats and stop discussing and thinking about for 3 days. If vacation time is due then take one so that you will not be thinking about the boat.
step three. Make decision.

Magically you will know what to do as your subconcience will sort it out.
I am no joking, I have seen people use this to sucess on the purchase of their largest lifetime expendeture.

pigslo
 

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Telstar 28
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Yes, the subconscious mind is better at making big decsions than the "rational" conscious mind is.
 

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purveyor of mischief
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pig's got the right idea...i'm assuming you have a short list of boats?..and after re-reading your original post... this is what i gleaned; you don't like the narrow steep companionway, small galley, narrow cramped berths, and lack of separate shower/ head set-up..and the title of the thread, lest we forget, deals with buying a boat you don't love. uhm...take pig's advice and keep looking..ask around here about the boats you like..i promise, people here have an opinion on just about everything.:D
and after you buy the boat..you will get great advice on just about everything else.
 

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No. No one buys a boat because it makes sense from any point of view. The more you subject the purchase to analysis the less sense it makes. It is an uncomfortable way to travel, it is an expense way to travel, and the costs of ownership are outrageous. It is a bad investment. Having said all that it is like buying a work of art that is bought out of foundness for the work. And I would not be without some type of sailboat.
 

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██▓▓▒▒░&
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Urban cops & firemen will often often buy a "beater", a car that is in lousy cosmetic condition but runs reliably, because they want something that can get them to work every day but looks like a POS so no one will steal it while it sits outside the station every day.

I don't think anyone loves a "beater", they buy it as a disposable tool and use it for what it is. Is that what your boat will be for?

If you don't love the boat, don't love the way it sails or houses you, and aren't going to be making a fortune from it as an investment...

Buying it because "We didn't want to look any further and this is all we could find" sounds like it could be something you'll just come to loathe, not enjoy. You're going to put a lot of time and energy and money into...what, something you'd rather not spend time on?

Why? Did a voice come out of the sky and say "KM, I want you to buy a boat this week, and you'd better do it now because next week we're going to start talking pairs and animals." ? <G>

I'd wait, unless there's some other reason on the short list of "Why I must buy a boat real fast."
 

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purveyor of mischief
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hellosailor nailed it...i'm betting 'buying a boat fever' has set in, brought on by a recent boat show visit perhaps. buying a boat for the sake of buying one cuz the "jones's" or brother/sister/best friend (you see where i'm going here), just bought a boat is the worst possible way to shop for one. selecting a boat based on important criteria is what needs to be considered (i know..duh)..i looked for over a year,and kept narrowing my list down,made compromises here and there, but in the end bought a boat i knew i'd be happy with and would make me smile each time i walked up to her and walked away from her, (frankly i can't imagine anything worse than buying a boat then hating yourself and it afterwards.i guess that's why the boatyards are the "land of misfit toys." anyone that has been to jabins in nappytown knows what i mean...but hey...YMMV and i could be way out in left field here.
km,what is important to you and the other part of the equation?
no evidence noted here of animals pairing up...
 

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Hitchin' a ride
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Km - we have been looking for 5 months now for our boat. Seems like an eternity, but I have talked to people that look for a year or more. Sometimes I get so sick of it, I find a boat that is just okay, but not really right, and almost buy it just to get it over with. But then I keep thinking of what the very knowledgeable sailors say on this site. 1. there are always more boats coming up for sale soon. 2. buy the boat you WANT. 3. you'll know the right boat when you see/sail it. So, we keep looking.....
 

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I'll buy into the theory of buying a boat that you love, that kind of makes it much like a marriage, and very few people would marry someone they hadnt spent anytime with, of course, if first sight/impressions are near hate then no need to spend time with them, but, spending time is the best way to have a sound relationship, person, or boat. Both have too much about them to base a long opinion on a casual contact. Spend some time with this boat, you may hit it off.
 
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