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Yea, I know, I'm old and don't get it.
This is the problem... we're all 'old' to some degree none of us are under 25 yrs of age. I bet if we took a poll here you'd be surprised at the age group of most posters here. I bet there is 1-2% of us under 30 yrs of age posting anywhere here or other sailing forums and if they are younger are not spending their time on these forums but instead sailing/power-boating, etc.
 

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Jeremiah, my statements are based upon my own experiences with lots of younger individuals that I know personally and what I see in day to day life. Yes, I'm old, and damned proud to have lived this long.

I read the article you referenced, and it really did not provide what I anticipated as quality research and factual information. Maybe I missed something, but the article appeared to have more to do with work ethics of younger individuals than anything else. I think the irony of this was seen a week ago when I went to a Verizon store to exchange some top boxes. There were two young ladies in their mid 20s behind the counter, and one young man about the same age. One of the ladies, who was very attractive, I might add, immediately acknowledged that I was in the store and asked if she could help me. The second lady never looked up from her I-phone, and the young man was busy packing some stuff in boxes, so I didn't expect him to respond.

I was there for at least 20 minutes, filling out forms, etc..., the young lady taking care of me asked several questions and put the information in her computer, and two other couples walked into the store. The other young lady was still glued to her I-phone and never looked up. Finally, the young man stopped what he was doing and acknowledged the other customers in the store. Now, if I were the owner/franchiser/manager of that store, and I witnessed that type of work ethic, that young lady would be looking for another place or type of employment. She either had an affliction or an addiction to her I-phone, and from my observations, that phone was the most important thing in her life. Do you sincerely believe that this type of individual could be remotely interested in the sport of sailing?

Gary :cool:
 

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The financing situation makes it difficult too. Banks will no longer finance a sailboat that is over 20 years old even though there are plenty of boats out there much older than that that are still very fine and capable boats, until they aren't.

Shhh... Don't tell my bank that I just financed a 35 year old boat, using a boat loan (not an "unsecured" loan).

Oh wait...they already know. :rolleyes:
 

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Good to see that old people are still complaining about the decline of the younger generation. Maybe in 30 or 40 years I can use my iphone to look back on this message and remind myself to not do the same.
 

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Shhh... Don't tell my bank that I just financed a 35 year old boat, using a boat loan (not an "unsecured" loan).

Oh wait...they already know. :rolleyes:

Wow....I am very happy for you. We were able to finance a 1982 Cape Dory 28 in 2007, but that was the last time. Since the "crash" or whatever you want to call it, we have been told by every bank (our own credit union of many years included), marine loan company, and marine loan broker that no, no, and triple no way will they finance the older boats. You are sitting on an information gold mine knowing someone who will do it.
 

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Good to see that old people are still complaining about the decline of the younger generation. Maybe in 30 or 40 years I can use my iphone to look back on this message and remind myself to not do the same.
It will be a handheld holographic virtual reality device, and your old photos won't be compatible:laugh
 

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All I know is that I'm supposed to be complaining about 20-somethings (I'm a bit over 40), but instead I spend my days hiring and managing them, and my weekends and evenings sailing with them. Half of my race crew is under 30; one of them can't even come to the bar with us after races. I don't think the problem is the people, I think it's mainly economics and the institutions that have grown around sailing. Not much you and I can do about the economy, but I feel like folks here can do a lot to reform our existing institutions, and to help build new ways to let folks get out on the water.
 

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Shhh... Don't tell my bank that I just financed a 35 year old boat, using a boat loan (not an "unsecured" loan).

Oh wait...they already know. :rolleyes:
Since I live in the same area as you and tried everything, including Trident Funding who said they had no sources that would do it, I would love to know who did your financing for you. Also, what kind of boat?
 

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I'm seeing an opposite trend. Boats are so cheap. Many of the kids that sailed when they were young, still do around here.

We bought our son a sail-away 26'er, for a dollar last fall(yeah it needs work...). He's looking forward to do a little coastal cruising when he gets home from school, mid summer. He has a friend with another 'dollar' boat (his dad paid some money, but it's only worth a dollar, trust me), that will join him. Those boats will be packed with kids that love to sail and be out on the water.

I can't imagine getting involved in sailing boats like that when I was his age. No way! The first boat I bought as an adult, was a canoe(275 bucks, I remember).

We've got him on the waiting list for a mooring(there's waiting lists in all harbors around here). Once he gets that, he can keep that boat for about 1,000 a year to haul store, launch and moor.

Not a bad price compared to many recreations.

Our daughter too, still loves to sail and comes home from NYC (where she works), to see us, and to go sailing(and she brings friends to sail). She's making real money and will probably be able to afford more than a dollar boat when she decides to come back to Maine (and she will, you just know your kids).

 

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Since I live in the same area as you and tried everything, including Trident Funding who said they had no sources that would do it, I would love to know who did your financing for you. Also, what kind of boat?
Navy Federal Credit Union, for a Tartan 33.

I spent 30 minutes on a Sunday afternoon, talking with a human representative (not a computer) who asked me a script of questions about the equipment, then she ran all that through an algorithm that spat out a result in the form of a maximum loan amount and an interest rate.

My friend also bought a Tartan 33 back in October and was successfully financed by USAA for a considerably larger sum than mine. (Yes we're twinsies now, don't judge.)
 

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Navy Federal Credit Union, for a Tartan 33.

I spent 30 minutes on a Sunday afternoon, talking with a human representative (not a computer) who asked me a script of questions about the equipment, then she ran all that through an algorithm that spat out a result in the form of a maximum loan amount and an interest rate.

My friend also bought a Tartan 33 back in October and was successfully financed by USAA for a considerably larger sum than mine. (Yes we're twinsies now, don't judge.)
Awesome. We used to have NFCU, but closed our accounts years ago and can't reopen them now because husband is out of the Navy, but not a full retiree, darned. However, we just moved all our accounts to USAA so maybe when it's time for our senior trawler we'll have better luck.

Congrats on your boat, and your twin.
 

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It's unfair to generalize about any group of society.. but there are definitely 'things' that have developed in today's connected world that I don't believe are necessarily for the better.

People talk about 'needing' a TV on the boat... really? ... How many times have you walked by a cafe patio and seen couples sitting together, both heads down tapping on their phones. I often wonder if they are texting each other rather than speaking to each other..;). All the same, the technology is amazing and enables good things too.

We get away for 6-8 weeks every summer.. rarely get wifi, don't have data plans and we're often out of coverage anyway. As much as I enjoy participating on SN, the summer breaks are very refreshing - and it always takes weeks to get back 'on line' like I am in winter.
 
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Another head scratcher is the sheer number of boats that are in the marina, covered in green and birdsh*t, and never leaving the dock.
It's a truly sad sight. For some dreams are like the stars that we can never reach, but none the less, we set our course by them, some plot a better course than others I suppose.
 

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I suspect what you're seeing has as much (or more) to do with families needing two incomes to make ends meet, with job and other demands on peoples' time making recreation less attainable. Plus it's easier to buy/rent a tent trailer and go on a road trip than to figure out how to sail a boat.

Another head scratcher is the sheer number of boats that are in the marina, covered in green and birdsh*t, and never leaving the dock. In our area presumably someone is still paying $4-5K/year to 'keep' something they clearly never use.
This must be a regional thing. My marina, and this whole general area, has a very active sailing culture. Not saying we don't have derelicts around, but I am not exaggerating when I say that there are so many boats going in and out of our marina during the season that you sometimes have to sit outside in the channel and circle around to wait your turn to come in and dock. And the entrance to Middle River is like the freeway sometimes with all the boat traffic going in and out, and a lot of it is sail. Ever been boating in the Annapolis area? They don't call it the sailboat capital of the world for nothing. I'm sure it's less than it used to be, but there are still a lot of sails flying around here on any given weekend during the season.

We have a little sailing center run by the county at the end of our street. They have quite a large fleet of little 12' sailing dinghies that they offer classes on. I love seeing them all out in the Bay loaded with kids learning to sail. I would love to see more of that. Maybe kids might like it more if they learned it that way, as a fun activity with other kids, rather than just being dragged along with their parents.
 

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"Dead" boats standing about in marinas has been endemic since I was a teenager (and that was a long time ago). I used to wander about our local marina and drool over boats that never left the dock year after year. We still have those boats all around us, different country, different era, same scenario. There's nothing new there.

Where I live/boat, we have the near-sinkers as well but I can look out the window on any given day at just about any time and see sail boats passing by. Most schools in our area have sailing on their sports curriculum and they are mostly oversubscribed. Any achorage within the cruising areas that we frequent is always full of boats, not all sailors but we are well represented all year round.

What is of considerable interest to me is that the mid-sized sailing boat is no longer built in NZ. If you want one, you buy used or you buy an import. This in a country where the 25 to 35 footer is the most common size out there. One can only assume that older boats are continuously changing hands or the ownership is growing older because the new imports are generally financially out of reach for the younger folks.

But to answer the question - no, sailing is definitely not dying in NZ.

BTW, who saw Team New Zealand sailing the last race in NYC a few days ago? From a penalty on the start line and stone-last to a kick-a$$ win. And we have a 49r crew who have not lost a regatta in the last 26 (I think) they have sailed and have won 4 consecutive world titles. No, sailing is alive and very well here down under.
 

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I should have said sailboat capital of the U.S. or sailboat capital of America.

When will I ever learn.....
Did you hear that Newport, Camden ME, San Francisco and San Diego, Seattle just declared war on Annapolis!

;-)

Oh yeah Vancouver sorry my CA brothers...
 

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The train maybe leaving the station, but IMHO we could all contribute to turning this situation for the better. Here's some ideas:

1. Don't make it elitist, because it isn't.
2. Don't always lead with how expensive it is.
3. Teach, but a little at a time. ...put your new sailer on the helm and shut up when they mess up.
4. Post pictures
5. Don't scare them away.
6. Don't minimize any sailing experience.
7. Take young people sailing.
Capecodda nailed it. The future of sailing is in all of our hands. I never set foot aboard a sailboat before I showed up at USNA, but I know I would have loved to sail as a youngster.

I have a secret plan to take as many people sailing as I can. We have many friends with young kids... who knows what lifelong memories and future sailing passion can be instilled in just one afternoon on a sailboat.

I can't really say how sailing is faring in NC, though there are just as many sailboats on the water down by Morehead City as I recall 10 or 20 years ago.

I think a lot has to do with the fact that a lot of "affordable" boats are getting older, and as I understand it, fewer and fewer boats are being made in the 20-23' range (which seems to be the ideal trailer sailor range for someone with a family). Older boats fall into disrepair, people get scared away from them. Newer boats are EXPENSIVE! (just look on sailboatlistings.com for 20-23' boats made since 2010).

On a side note, I sometimes wonder if there isn't a potential business for buying project sailboats, restoring them to excellent or like-new condition, and reselling for a modest profit.
 
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