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we are starting on the road to ownership of a preowned island packet 38'', probably around an 89 or 90. We have heard nothing but wonderful feedback so far and would appreciate any additional information that anyone might have.
 

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Hi there,

not sure how to phrase this, but after looking at a bunch of boats, I decided against the IPs for various reasons. For one, they aren''t my kind of boat (too heavy). For another, I think they have gotten way too expensive for what they offer. If I was going for something along this line of boat, I''d check out Valiants, or maybe a used Lafitte 44. Or, check out Bob Perry''s website for the boat-buying advice service.

...Chris
 

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Quoting from my comments comparing a Benteau 411 to the Island Packet:

"I have always thought that Island Packets are way over priced and way over sold; very often (but not always) to people who are entering the sport. (I base that comment on conversations that I have had with past and present Island Packet owners at boat shows. I am always amazed how many say that an IP was their first boat.)

Island Packets have never made any sense at all for the way most of us use our boats on the U.S.Atlantic coast. They are not good as light to moderate air sailers (the predominant summer condition on the mid U.S. Atlantic Coast) and they don''t seem to be great heavy weather boats either. The 380 really lacks a lot of the key components that I would look for in an offshore cruiser (seaberths for instance). For that matter, I have never been all that impressed with the build quality of the Island Packets(but some people are) because of such items as iron ballast in concrete (recently changed to lead in polyester resin which is slightly better), or the post mounted rudder masquerading as a keel hung rudder with a rather flimsey strap at it''s bottom to mention a couple deal buster kind of issues. I do think some of their details are quite nice for liveaboard types.

To me, it comes down to your goals for buying a sailboat (and people buy sailboats for a lot of reasons most of which are equally valid with each other). If you are just buying a boat to live on and you really do not care how well the boat sails or how much time you will spend motoring, then the Island Packet might work for you.

But if you are buying a sailboat because you really want to sail well and want to be able to voyage from place to place driven on the force of the wind, then there are much better sailing boats out there for the same dollars.

IP are designed around the idea (directly or indirectly) that there is merit to craming a lot of room and weight into a short hull. Based on my 37 years of sailing experience there is no excuse and no real advantage to that approach to yacht design other than perhaps a concern with slip fees.

Island Packets seem to offer a lot room in a short package but what real good is that? None that I know of.

When dealing with wind and wave, a finer hull actually does better. Nothing succeeds like length(read both the Fastnet and Sidney Hobart disaster reports). Stubby is wet and feel greater impacts from each wave.

As I have said many times, weight in and of itself does nothing good for a boat. It does not make it strong, or stable, or comfortable in a seaway. It does not give a boat the ability to survive a big storm or an unexpected visit to the beach.

Heavier boats, that are not carefully modeled, (and in my opinion the IP''s are not all that well modeled) require more sail area to drive their greater drag through the water. In my experience, this means more physical strength is required to sail them and as a result, if you try to sail them well, they wear you out sooner.

Then there is motion at sea. There are two factors that lead to uncomfortable motion, roll angle and roll speed. Navy studies suggest that both have equal impact on the comfort of people onboard boats. IP salesmen make a strong point about its slow roll rate but from observation, they seem to roll through much wider roll angles than other boats around them. I have sailed up behind them and really studied them on windier days (you rarely see them sailing in normal conditions) and they are making lots of leeway and seemed to be heeled more acutely than other cruising boats around them. Looking at rudder angles and at the owner''s faces, they seem to be fighting for control when a true offshore boat should not be.

I know that there are a fair number of IP''s out there cruising and that there are IP owners who like their boat. (Most people do like their boats.) I also know that a lot of these boats are sold to people with big dreams, some who never really learn to sail the boats or become prematurely convinced that sailing is a lot more difficult than it really is. To these people (and I have met quite a few of them) their Island Packet was a graveyard of dreams. As I have said before, from my observations, in the long run, I think you would be better off buying a trawler if you are going to cruise the U.S. Mid-Atlantic coast, than an IP since you will probably spend less time motoring."

Respectfully
Jeff
 

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If you like to sail then take a sail on a IP 38, a Erickson 38, a Tartan 40 CB and maybe a Catlina 380. Don''t listen to the IP brokers. They lie.

I would not have an IP if it were free as I like to sail.

MM
 

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I have an IP 40 and will agree with one of the comments above--that an IP may not be suitable for midatlantic coastal cruising. I'll add that I would also rather have a C&C 99 than my IP for Key West Race Week.

However, I don't do either of these in my boat. I live aboard and cruise the E and W Caribbean full time. This past season, I was able to sail from Venezeula up and down the E Caribbean as far as Puerto Rico. I returned to Venezuela by making a passage South from St. Croix. 90% of the time this past season I was sailing and not motoring. Do I like to sail? I love to.

I have been cruising for the past 20 months. In this time I have seen far more IP owners out here than Catalinas, Ericksons, and Tartans combined. In addition to having a fine boat, you'll open the door to a group of passionate owners that will freely share their experience with their boats.

Some good friends of mine recently completed a clockwise circle of the Caribbean in their IP 38. The name of the vessel is S/V Good Hope. Do a search and you'll find their website.

Best Regards,
ConchCruzer
S/V Eventyr IP40
www.ipphotos.com/eventyr
 

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Apples And Oranges Full Keel Ocean Boats or Fin Keel Racers/Cruisers

Put down your sailing magazines for a minute!

How do you compare Benteau ,Catalinas, Ericksons, and Tartans to an IP??

Do you think these Fin keel light boats can handle days out there with a serious Following sea and wind off your stern quarter? Lets not even get into a wing keel discussion.....You've never rocked rail to rail at anchor on a Benteau .

In the trades a heavy boat will beat any day a Light Displacement Fin Keel. They will be reefed down while a IP will be pushing Hull Speed.

All these boats can make the trip however you'll do it easiers on an IP.

In regards to a Valiant it came in dead last in the 2006 Newport Bermuda
Race........

By the way just a ex-cruiser who has a Fin keel light weight boat.

Esscapod has made a good choice an used IP 38 holds its price and is hard to find on the market.
 

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A lot of whether the IP 38 is really the right boat for Esscapod has to do with what kind of sailing he is planning on doing. If he is mainly going to be weekending on the local bay, or daysailing, the IP38 is probably not the right boat for him.

If he is planning on setting sail to see what lies beyond the sunset...then the IP38 might be a very good choice. Before giving him advice on whether the boat is an appropriate choice, it might be good to hear from him and find out what his plans are.
 

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Jeff_H said:
Heavier boats, that are not carefully modeled, (and in my opinion the IP''s are not all that well modeled) require more sail area to drive their greater drag through the water. In my experience, this means more physical strength is required to sail them and as a result, if you try to sail them well, they wear you out sooner.

I have sailed up behind them and really studied them on windier days (you rarely see them sailing in normal conditions) and they are making lots of leeway and seemed to be heeled more acutely than other cruising boats around them. Looking at rudder angles and at the owner''s faces, they seem to be fighting for control when a true offshore boat should not be.

Respectfully
Jeff
Thought I'd interject a couple of "left coast" observations Jeff's Mid Altlantic
analyisis.

On the first quoted paragraph, I agree that heavier vessels require more sail area. Elsewhere I have stated that on full keel heavy designs that horsepower is the name of the game. This may or may not require more physical strenth to sail depending on, the vessels design and her purchase systems

Here, in light air San Diego I have not observed any IP's sailing well to windward either. In fact I had been able to sail over the top of a few of them in my old 1964 CCA S/S 30 foot full keeled centerboard design. (I no longer own the beloved "Athena"). At Jeffs comments on the wallowing of the vessels and especially of the discriptions of extreme rudder angles and helmsmens strained faces; I wonder if some of this might be attributed to a lack of experience in trim and sail selection?

Dewey
 

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Jaime- You're ruining all the fun... I was seeing if any one else would notice someone dug up an old thread. :D
 

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sailingdog said:
Jaime- You're ruining all the fun... I was seeing if any one else would notice someone dug up an old thread. :D
It would appear that several old threads have been resuurected.

Dewey
 

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I actually like reading the old threads. For what its worth, (and its totally irrelevant at this point), I think IP's are excellent boats. They are comfortable, solid, extremely well built and sail well in all wind conditions. Sure you can argue that you only need a day sailor but if you can afford the Mercedes of boats, why not?
 

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;) Just pointing it out Dan - have at it.
I thought it hilarious to debate comments from 6 years ago though.

I love some of the old threads thoug..."Suddenly Inherited a boat" is my fav so far.

sailingdog said:
Jaime- You're ruining all the fun... I was seeing if any one else would notice someone dug up an old thread. :D
 

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LOL... and in some cases the old threads have been made irrelavant by advances in technology... :) On one board I was on, forget which one, they had dug up an old LORAN thread... With the advent of cheap GPS units, LORAN is less than useful.
 

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I know this is an old thread however I must add my 2 cents worth. My first boat was a 1972 Ericson 32 current boat is an Island Packet 350. The only thing the Ericson had over the IP is it's light air ability. I am on the left coast and most of my sailing is to Catalina and back. At times there is light winds with calm seas but I have been in the San Pedro Channel many times when it was windy and rough. When it gets rough the IP has it all over the Ericson.

As for speed, last Sunday on my return trip from Catalina we had 12 knots wind from 60 to 80 degrees freshing to 18 knots by mid channel with confused seas of 5 feet. We had full main, staysail and 130% jib up. Our boat speed ranged from a low of 6.2 knots to a high of 8.1 knots. The wife and I were comfortable. Had we been on our old Ericson it would have been an E ticket ride with a double reefed main and rolled in jib. BTH on the way home we passed an Alberg 35 and a Catalina 36 that left the Island 30 minutes ahead of us.

The one thing my IP lacks is upwind in light air. I have solved this by using a code 0 spinnaker. It works like a drifter in light air allowing me to point to 45 degrees.
Mike IP350 #131
Aquila
 

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hmmmm - veddy intadesting

I enjoyed reading your post, Jeff H. It made me realize how much homework I have to do before I buy a boat. So since you sound like you know as much about sailing as anyone else around here, let me ask you this: (I'm a new member here and maybe not familiar with the proper protocol so I hope I'm not starting WWIII) but if I'm looking for a good all around sailboat in the 42 to 51 ft range with the best VALUE (good bang for the buck), where do you think Beneteau's stack up?
 

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BayouElton... Where will you be sailing and what type of sailing do you plan to do. Living aboard, weekending etc?
On a scale of 1-10 in terms of construction the Bene's rank in the low digits...while for space and livability they rank high. They are generally pretty fast boats as well. Price is cheap compared to better built boats. They are most frequently compared to other mass production boats like Hunter, Catalina, Bavaria, Jeaneau.
 

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Quote)I know this is an old thread however I must add my 2 cents worth. My first boat was a 1972 Ericson 32 current boat is an Island Packet 350. The only thing the Ericson had over the IP is it's light air ability.(unquote

Are you saying that your IP went to weather the as well as your Ericson did!!??

If you are reasonable, you all will find that Jeff is 100% correct. I used to be a heavy displacement, full keel, two stick man....I listened, did my homework and kept an open mind. My next boat will be the opposite of what I believed back then.
 

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The Beneteau First 42 from the mid to late eighties is a great boat, IMHO, if you can find one tha thas been maintained. Frers design, higher build quality than many other Beneteaus, fairly stiff and fast. Personally, I would only consider the lead keel and not the iron one but that is open to debate.
 
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