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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Our new to us boat (2005 Hunter 36) is leaking. The backing plates on the seacocks is plywood. One of the valves is wet at the bottom. It leaks about a tablespoon every two hours or so. Is there any sealant I could apply to keep the water out? I don't want to pull the boat out just for this, the bottom was just painted. Do you think Flex Seal would do the job?
 

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Dirt Free
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You will never stop a leak from the inside. I have been fighting the same issue.
I'm just gonna have to bite the bullet. I don't like anything in my bilge except dust.
 

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You will never stop a leak from the inside. I have been fighting the same issue.
I'm just gonna have to bite the bullet. I don't like anything in my bilge except dust.
I really wanted to Like this post but I couldn't bring myself to do it. I like the fact that it's good information but the information true as it is really sucks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm thinking hot glue gun. I think the problem is the water pressure from the leak keeps the sealant from adhering to the surface. Since hot glue is tacky and set quickly I think it does stand a chance. If the glue holds the water back for half hour or so then a quick set epoxy (JB Weld ) stands a chance. I hope. I'll let you know.
 

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bell ringer
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Is the leak a big deal? Are you one that has to have a dry bilge? Is it going to suddenly get worst? Have you tried tightening the nut? Are you sure it isn't leaking from the outlet or hose?

For me if I wouldn't worry about it.
 

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The problem is you don't know what/where the leak actually is.
You are suggesting water is coming from outside from between the fibreglass and the metal of the thru-hull. That's not really a problem. Just a bit of water.

But what if the thru-hull is totally corroded and the water is coming through the metal?
That could be a catastrophic failure at any time sinking your boat.

Maybe you can see enough metal to use a hacksaw to cut into the metal to see the colour inside? If it's pinkish you need to change the thru-hull.

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The problem is you don't know what/where the leak actually is.
You are suggesting water is coming from outside from between the fibreglass and the metal of the thru-hull. That's not really a problem. Just a bit of water.

But what if the thru-hull is totally corroded and the water is coming through the metal?
That could be a catastrophic failure at any time sinking your boat.

Maybe you can see enough metal to use a hack saw to cut into the metal to see the colour inside? If it's pinkish you need to change the thru-hull.

Mark
Gezzz Mark like I don't have enough phobias as it is. I worry about the sudden loss of gravity, the depolarization of molecular adhesion and now corroded thru hulls. The thru hulls are stout bronze. Pretty sure the leak is between the fiberglass and the thru hull.

Is the leak a big deal? Are you one that has to have a dry bilge? Is it going to suddenly get worst? Have you tried tightening the nut? Are you sure it isn't leaking from the outlet or hose?

For me if I wouldn't worry about it.
Don, yea I want a dry dusty bilge. Not leaking from the hose because there isn't one. It is a spare thru hull. It is only wet from the plywood backing down to the hull. And as far as tightening the nut, I'm concerned that the thru hull would spin breaking seal between the thru hull and hull making an aggravating situation a catastrophe.
 

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Gezzz Mark like I don't have enough phobias as it is. I worry about the sudden loss of gravity, the depolarization of molecular adhesion and now corroded thru hulls. The thru hulls are stout bronze. Pretty sure the leak is between the fiberglass and the thru hull.


Don, yea I want a dry dusty bilge. Not leaking from the hose because there isn't one. It is a spare thru hull. It is only wet from the plywood backing down to the hull. And as far as tightening the nut, I'm concerned that the thru hull would spin breaking seal between the thru hull and hull making an aggravating situation a catastrophe.
Someone in the water with one of these while you tighten the nut.
 

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Kinda made me chuckle there Jer, most people call it "brittle".

[/QUOTE]

Shh ! You'll scare hundreds of thousands of people with bronze propellers, shafts and seacocks
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Kinda made me chuckle there Jer, most people call it "brittle".
What Are the Properties of Bronze?

Plywood doesn't tolerate water very long, would'nt it be a problem if rotted ?
Pretty sure the plywood was installed at the factory in 2005. It has lasted this long. And yes it wood be a problem if (when) it rotted.
 

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bell ringer
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Pretty sure the plywood was installed at the factory in 2005. It has lasted this long. And yes it wood be a problem if (when) it rotted.
Really only you can determine if it is rotten enough to require a special haul out to fix (you may as well plan on a new fitting and valve). Stick it with a screwdriver and see if it is rotten.

All my 2001 Hunter wood backing plates and valves are still good.
 

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I don't know how large your cajones are, but you could theoretically remove the thru-hull; plug the hole with a bung; clean up the inner and outer surfaces, then replace or re-install the thru-hull using 4200 as a sealant (and presumably a better backing plate). You'd need to have a good bilge pump and work fast, but I think it might be doable.

I've removed and replaced the transducer for my speedo and although the amount of water coming in is intimidating, I think it was less than the bilge pump could keep up with (maybe ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I don't know how large your cajones are, but you could theoretically remove the thru-hull; plug the hole with a bung; clean up the inner and outer surfaces, then replace or re-install the thru-hull using 4200 as a sealant (and presumably a better backing plate). You'd need to have a good bilge pump and work fast, but I think it might be doable.

I've removed and replaced the transducer for my speedo and although the amount of water coming in is intimidating, I think it was less than the bilge pump could keep up with (maybe ;)
I did something similar to our first sailboat, well a friend and I did. We installed a speed transducer while in the water. I drilled a hole in the forward locker, he (while in the water) stuck a plumbers plunger over the hole to stop the water. I gooped up the transducer with 5200 then handed it over to him. He removed the plunger and stuck the transducer in the hole. I added the nuts and tighten them down. I think we got about a half gallon of water in the boat.

When it cools down this evening I'm going to try the hole glue gun to see if that stops the water flow long enough for epoxy to kick off.
 
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Why not just use underwater epoxy? Seems like you could postpone a haul out for a good while. Is there something I'm missing here?
I kinda doubt getting the wetted surface clean enough to get the epoxy to bond.
Tomorrow I'm going to loosen the throughull and nut (not fully removing), wrap butyly tape around them inside and out and retighten. I'll dry eveything off, wrap it in paper towel and check over the next couple of days to see if the towel gets wet.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
139531


I think I exaggerated the amount of water and the rate of leakage. After 24 hours or so I used a paper towel to soak up about a half a teaspoon. It is leaking on the bottom of the plywood. The top of the wood is bone dry and the plys are separating. Fired up the wife's hot glue gun and ran a big bead around the plywood bottom joint and up and over the top of the backing plate. Stay tuned for a report tomorrow, or when I get around to it if the hot glue did the trick. Or maybe it is not leaking at all and the water is left over from the time I changed the shower sump pump.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I would goop it from the outside
Save the backing wood
We just bought the boat two weeks ago and the bottom paint was fresh. I really don't want to haul the boat yet. When the boat is hauled the wood backing plates will be replaced with G10 or similar material.
 

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It seems interesting that the leak seems to be around the plywood. If the flange is properly bedded on the outside, the punky ply on the inside shouldn't matter so much. Not to a raise a red flag, but if the sealant on the outside isn't doing its job, more trouble could be ahead. That looks like a plastic fitting. Is it possible it's got a crack?

PS, love the plunger idea!
 
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