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"It seems happened too often for yachties"

What exactly does that mean?
 

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Master Mariner
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Latest info;
Girlfriend is back in Norway.
Thought is that the boat blew up; propane?
 

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Well, as per my personal opinion it is not the regular thing you find in Caribbean. As far as I know they are generally peace loving people. There might be another story behind the scene.

Hope we find a clear picture of incident once the girl speaks out.
 

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Learning the HARD way...
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What a poorly written article!

First the implication is that the Norwegian GF killed him and ran away to Norway. Then the author reveals that they have been a couple for some time and the GF always flies home to Norway ahead of him. Then there are two lines where a friend says it may have been an accident, and that he may have bent over a gas canister. Then the implication changes to he was murdered by boat boys of St Vincent.
The murder comes just two months after retired management consultant Roger Pratt, 62, was murdered and his wife Margaret, 60, injured when robbers attacked their yacht as it lay moored off the Caribbean island of St Lucia.
This is sensationalism at its worst!...

Given the questionable evidence in the article, it seems far more likely that he was the victim of an onboard gas explosion, which he survived long enough to don a life vest, and then succumbed to his injuries.
 
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"He trained the special forces in Britain, the SAS I believe, although he was a civilian and did not have a rank."
Maybe he knew too much and got whacked.
 

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When the real facts are slow to emerge it really can be distressing.

This boat is well know, but also theres a few other boats called Asante in, were, in the Caribbean.

I hope the real facts get sorted out quickly.
 

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What a poorly written article!

First the implication is that the Norwegian GF killed him and ran away to Norway. Then the author reveals that they have been a couple for some time and the GF always flies home to Norway ahead of him. Then there are two lines where a friend says it may have been an accident, and that he may have bent over a gas canister. Then the implication changes to he was murdered by boat boys of St Vincent.

This is sensationalism at its worst!...

Given the questionable evidence in the article, it seems far more likely that he was the victim of an onboard gas explosion, which he survived long enough to don a life vest, and then succumbed to his injuries.
Exactly...

But by DAILY MAIL standards, it was well done, and achieved its objective :)

LPG explosion sure sounds most likely to me, cruisers have been unlucky with propane in the Caribbean lately...

LPG Safety - Inside Practical Sailor Blog Article

http://riodulcechisme.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1156&Itemid=1


 

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It's hard to square that fact set and the newspaper photo with murder, unless someone rigged the boat for a gas explosion. Looks like a sad accident and a warning to all to keep your propane systems and gas alarms in good repair.

When was the last time you tested your gas alarms?

---------------- in a related story posted by Jon Eisberg immediately above--------

Do you have gas alarms? Some don't. In the post above Jon has a photo of a gas explosion in the Rio Dulce. Here's more info on the cause of that explosion. It seems the guilty party got away.
Follow Jon's link for the photo.

"Divers Doug of s/v Dances With Wind and Vito of s/v Blue Island recovered the propane stove from s/v Panacea which exploded yesterday morning. They discovered that the rubber hose to the stove had been chewed through by a rat. The rat, which survived the explosion was last seen floating on a cushion, heading downriver. Still no update on the condition of Richard who remains in intensive care in a Guatemala City hospital. The propane tank was later discovered. It was not equipped with a 12 volt safety cutoff solenoid and one control knob on the stove was in the open position."
 

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Learning the HARD way...
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---------------- in a related story posted by Jon Eisberg immediately above--------

Do you have gas alarms? Some don't. In the post above Jon has a photo of a gas explosion in the Rio Dulce. Here's more info on the cause of that explosion. It seems the guilty party got away.
Follow Jon's link for the photo.

"Divers Doug of s/v Dances With Wind and Vito of s/v Blue Island recovered the propane stove from s/v Panacea which exploded yesterday morning. They discovered that the rubber hose to the stove had been chewed through by a rat. The rat, which survived the explosion was last seen floating on a cushion, heading downriver. Still no update on the condition of Richard who remains in intensive care in a Guatemala City hospital. The propane tank was later discovered. It was not equipped with a 12 volt safety cutoff solenoid and one control knob on the stove was in the open position."
I forgot where I read the article about this boat explosion. It was not the Rio Dulce link above, nor could I find this tidbit there. However, it seems that the rat (yes, the rodent with a long tail) that chewed through the propane line was seen after the explosion floating on a throwable PFD. It seems that they are the first to leave... Perhaps this is the "guilty party" to which you are referring in the above post?...
 

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The first gas alarm that should go off in the mind of any boat owner is the one that screams out, "get this stuff off my boat." Why anyone would have this potential bomb on a boat is a mystery. There are safer ways to heat up pots and pans.
 

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... hmmm, an Alberg 35. That wouldn't be powered by an Atomic Four, would it?

Consider this quote from Richard Mueller's The Physics of Explosions about gasoline;
What makes it so devastating is the fact that 15,000 lbs of gasoline contain the energy equivalent of 150,000 lbs of TNT.
You can read the entire paper here; The Physics of Explosions

[EDIT - adding this]
From http://www.cob.org/services/safety/education/gasoline.aspx
1 gallon of gasoline = 20 sticks of dynamite!
 

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Over Hill Sailing Club
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Learning the HARD way...
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Agreed with that, but I do like to use the oven, and I don't like to row my dinghy with more than me aboard...:)
 

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美国华人, 帆船
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·

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Agreed with that, but I do like to use the oven, and I don't like to row my dinghy with more than me aboard...:)
So far I have avoided having a motor for the dink but will eventually give in. I don't have much problem with a small tank of gasoline out in the open where it can be seen. The chances for fume build-up/explosion are pretty low. I mostly just don't want to have to deal with another registration and another fuel container to schlep around. Nor do I want to have to worry about locking the damned motor up, mounting it on the rail when not in use, etc. It would just add one more level of complication. I can easily just heft my little dink up right over the lifelines when not in use and grab the painter to tilt it up to drain out rainwater.

Propane presents too many unseen connections and mechanisms where failure can occur, letting heavier-than-air gas work into the bilge. Unlike a house, a boat moves, creating repeated stress on hoses, connections, etc. Most of the explosions seem to come from these kinds of failures. If done right and maintained, it's not a problem but things often get overlooked. That said, I would love to have an oven.
 

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Sea Sprite 23 #110 (20)
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I do not even trust propane grills.. I would never have it on my boat
 

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So far I have avoided having a motor for the dink but will eventually give in. I don't have much problem with a small tank of gasoline out in the open where it can be seen.
Yes, and your earlier statement "Funny you should mention gasoline. I was going to put it as the #2 worst thing to have aboard:) "

The reality is most cruising boats are floating bombs. Now, before all and sundry have a heart attack let me say I bet most are not much better than mine: My dinghy tank at sea is in the lazarette next to the spare 5 gallons os petrol/gasoline, alongside 6 gerrys of diesel, a gallon of mutatic acid and a gallon of paint thinners and this is the lazzarette that the copper tubing from the gas tanks runs to the stove!!!

So on most boats where does one keep everything separated? Go to bed cuddling a diesel gerry? Strap them to the rails to see a wave wipe your lifelines out, or be stolen at anchorage?

Now if the incident of likelihood of this death: galley fire whilst making coffee happened to my boat I would be in deep, deep do-do. Exactly like the deceased.

Yes, I am looking for a better solution... But I cant see one at the mo. :rolleyes:


Mark
 
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