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Biting my tongue, crossing my fingers, salt over the shoulder.

I don't think I've seen a single season go by without one boat at the bottom of it's slip. The yard does a good job of insuring you aren't taking on water, before taking you out of the slings. Still, it seems things let go.

We splashed last week and all my thru-hulls are closed right now. I will not leave them open for any length of time, unless I am aboard. In season, there are a few exceptions, such as the air conditioning intakes, which are necessary to run the dehumidifier. Otherwise, everything is left closed.
 

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Another 'spring chicken' here, doing research. Is it correct to assume the reason most of the boats sink are open seacocks?
The more natural answer would be that most are the result of some hull penetration. Obvious, I'm sure.

It can also be the shaft penetration or saildrive or depthsounder or speed wheel.

I suppose the one I've heard the most is a hose separation or split, but they would be prevented by a closed thru hull.
 

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......And of course, unless the yard is crazy busy, you might tip the guys and ask them to just let it hang in the water for an extra five minutes before they pull the slings, just in case you find water coming in someplace.
Isn't that standard operating procedure? It is at our yard. Someone is down below, checking for ingress before she floats out of the lift bay.

Unfortunately, its seems Murphy only works overnight. As the hoses, etc, seems to let go after everyone has left for the day. I find it astonishing, but I am told that most boats in the marina leave their thru hulls open 24/7.
 
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