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Crealock 37
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I need to replace my jacklines. I searched threads here related to jacklines but didn't see a mention of just how strong they need to be. Would a 2000 pound breaking strength be enough?

Secondly, how are you attached the webbing? Are you having loops sewn in then using a shackle or other fitting? Or just tying them in? If tying what knot are you using? I'm planning round-turn with half-hitches to that I can get them snug.

Thanks.
 

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EU standard is minimum 600kg (1325 lb approx). You can attach the webbing with a single line passing through each eye and the jackline. This will need only two knots. Use any knot you like.
 

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Years ago I used pre-made jacklines that came with a sewn eye on one end. No longer, I have been using 1 inch nylon tubular webbing. I use a straight piece without eyes, on both sidedecks. It has a 4,000 pound breaking strength. I rig mine from the bow cleat to the stern cleat. I use cleat hitches to secure them.

While I never had to actually put them to the test, but I am very confident of them. I did use them to double up on dock lines during a storm once. held with no problems.
 

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Telstar 28
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The racing rules generally require a breaking strength of 6000 lbs. This is because of the fairly significant g-forces that a sailboat can generate. If you think about the forces that a spinnaker broach or a crash gybe can produce, you'd understand why they've set that as a minimum limit.
 

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A little engineering thought is needed....

EU standard is minimum 600kg (1325 lb approx). You can attach the webbing with a single line passing through each eye and the jackline. This will need only two knots. Use any knot you like.
Assume you are falling some distance. Assume the line is tight, and there is a "tight-rope effect" force multiplier in action. I bet I can grab your 1300# line and snap it with a pair of gloves in the middle. Certainly I can after knots, chafe, and sunlight take their tolls. I wonder if the 1300# is the Safe Working Load (SWL). With a common 4-5 safety factor, that's close.

All gear for falls - mountaineering, sailing, or OSHA - has requirements around 5000-6000# because the math works out about the same. All of the gear is built to that standard.

Knots are fine - just make sure that they are high efficiency knots like a figure eight on a bight or other. The attachment points need to be very solid - probably not handrails or stanchions.

Some like tubular webbing, because it isn't too bad to walk on, but the nylon stuff doesn't handle sun well - within 1 year it will be ~50%. I use 1/2" line, because I run my jack lines above the deck and it handles sun well, but multihulls are different, and that is probably not for you.

Perhaps the main thing is to keep your lanyard short enough to keep you on the boat. Hanging off the side is a real problem.
 
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