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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Family of 6 - mainly cruising north channel of Lake Huron. Would like to go farther afield eventually. Novice sailors.

Was considering a niagara 35 but can't quite afford it. The Jeanneau is a quite a bit lighter obviously yet seems like it may be a good choice for us.
*it has lots of room for kids
*build quality is supposed to be good
*good form stability not to tender
* good in light air (common here)
*i can afford it

Worried that it will be to light for me to handle in bad weather - scary for the crew

Thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Any thoughts on how this boat will sail? And would it be a good novice/family boat?
 

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1987 Sabre 42 c/b
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I don't have an specific experience with the boat you are asking about. But I will say if you like the boat and it is up to date on its maintenance it will be a fine boat for you and your family to use for you intended purposes and more most likely. Be patient and learn your limits and your boats 'personality' and enjoy. The boat is normally not the limiting factor for most people's sailing. If one day you out grow your boat in one manor or another you can always get a different one that suites your desires more at that time. It is more important that you get our their and started.

Good Luck

Foster
 

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I haven't actually sailed one, but there was one at our club, and I have been on board it a couple of times. I recall my impression at the time was that the layout was good and the interior was nicely finished.

Looking at the specs I wouldn't worry about it being scary in bigger breeze. It has a sail area/displacement ratio of 17 which is not overly powerful. That tells me the boat may suffer a little bit in light air, but will be easier to sail when the breeze picks up, even short handed.

I suggest you post your question on the Jeanneau Owners forum. You will find a number of Attalia owners there.


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Family of 6 - mainly cruising north channel of Lake Huron. Would like to go farther afield eventually. Novice sailors.

Was considering a niagara 35 but can't quite afford it. The Jeanneau is a quite a bit lighter obviously yet seems like it may be a good choice for us.
*it has lots of room for kids
*build quality is supposed to be good
*good form stability not to tender
* good in light air (common here)
*i can afford it

Worried that it will be to light for me to handle in bad weather - scary for the crew

Thoughts?
**Here is an in depth review.
 

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Quote.
"First impressions
The prolific team of Michel Joubert and Bernard Nivelt, who in those days specialized in boats less than 35 feet long, designed the Attalia 32 and patterned it closely after their 1981 half-ton world champion, Air Bigouden. The Attalia, which has an LOD of 30 feet, 2 inches and an LOA of 31 feet, 10 inches, blends a performance hull shape with a surprisingly comfortable interior, a concept that --French builders would essentially patent over the next 20 years."
 

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My 85 Tony Castro designed Arcadia is literally about 2' shorter. I've had no real issues in winds to 40-45 knots here in Puget Sound. Issue I have heard about great lakes, is due to shallowness of the lakes, the waves are shorter and steeper. probably like here with the wind against the tide.
The SA/Disp as noted by shock at 17-1 is similar for my arcadia with 100% triangles. But will swag with a 155 genoa, full roached main you will be as i am around 24 or 25-1. So If the BIG genoa is lighter in weight, you can do okay in light winds.
With that said, their are some issues with boats of that age. Things may be fixed, maybe not. Like the foam back hull liner. Does it have newer standing rigging, sails, running rigging etc. if not, you could have a bunch of money going out to fix or replace this stuff. It is a 35 year old boat.
Otherwise, it is probably more solid built than newer Jeanneaus in many ways. Altho not asopen down below, due to current model hull shapes, slightly wider etc.
Jeanneau-owners.com has good info on the boat, as does its forum, as is the FB page.

marty
 

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My previous boat was a Cal 9.2, a US version of the Jeanneau Rush. Both the Rush and the Attalia are based on IOR half ton racing boats. Dimensions and styling are very similar. My Cal was a nice sailing boat and comfortable for cruising with a couple. Family of 6? Not really unless you are talking about 2 adults and 4 smaller children. My Cal was pretty good in light air, especially going upwind with a big genny. I did pretty well in club races with her.
 

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The Cal9.2 was a pre fastnet Jim Holland? IOR half ton design. unlike the Attalia is a post fastnet IOR design. So a LOT of the pinched stern, deathrole issues have been removed from the version 3 IOR designs as the attalia and my small half ton Arcadia are. that is not to say this will not deathroll, yes its happened, but it is harder to do. The base hull design is different. As noted, not sure that ANY of these boats are truly for a long term cruise boat for a family of 6. But it is doable.

marty
 
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