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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone.

One thing i noticed on my new boat is that the spreaders on the mast seem to be pretty much misaligned (one is higher than the other.

Is this something that i should look into? Is there something that should hold the cable and spreader or are those things just free floating? If this needs adjustment do i need to take the mast down?

I know the picture shows them being symmetrical but that's just the angle i took the shot. One really is higher than the other on the lines.
 

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Congrats on the new boat and welcome to the forum.

It would seem you did not have a survey done of the boat, or this would have been identified. The standing rigging is important for both sailing efficiency and safety. If you're unfamiliar, I highly suggest hiring a professional rigger to spend a few hours with you. Knowing the rig is safe and properly tuned is huge. A 28ft boat is on the bubble over whether one can climb the mast. Depends a bit on the weight of the climber too.

I'm not specifically familiar with your rig. With a pair binoculars, you should easily be able to tell if the shrouds are free floating through the end of the spreaders.

It's worth the initial investment in the pro and you may be able to take it from there.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Unfortunately where i live there are no "Pro's". Also i got the boat almost for free so survey's aren't something you can easily get down here unless you have serious money. I suppose it is the Pro's that brought this boat to the state it is in right now. I like doing things my self and not relying on others and i am thinking of getting those Mast Climbers to get up there and check. The line seems to have been fixed at the upper portion on the right spreader and for some reason slipped.
 

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No such thing as a free boat. One just hopes that rigging, decking, engines, etc, don't cost more to repair than she's worth. Be careful climbing your mast. Definitely not alone.

It's helpful if you include your general location in your profile, so members can suggest local solutions. If you're in the US, Jeanneau USA in Annapolis can likely get you the rigging specs for your boat.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
It wasn't free but whatever i got from selling my bike i bought the boat with :) I don't mind the work and service. For me its fun, i have all the tools and don't have a problem rebuilding it. The rigging seems fine, the engine i just finished servicing and defauling was done on it last year.

I am located in Cyprus (Europe). Things aren't really done here "by the book" since those who laid out the teak, painted the boat and did the engine swap did a job worse than a car mechanic. So i suppose noone is going to give my boat more love and care then my self.

Unfortunately Alone is what i had in mind just about as with everything else. I suppose if i take it slow and do it properly, there shouldn't be a problem (i am a rock climber so i am not new to rigging and safety)
 

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In short - Yes your spreaders should be at the same angle.
 

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...I am located in Cyprus (Europe)...
Very cool. We'll look forward to hearing more about sailing there. There should be rigging companies not too far away, or sail to them maybe? (if she's safe)

Unfortunately Alone is what i had in mind just about as with everything else. I suppose if i take it slow and do it properly, there shouldn't be a problem
The primary issue is whether the boat has enough ballast to stay upright, with your weight on the mast. The further up you go, the more tenuous. Perhaps you have a place to cleat down both sides of the boat to make it safer. Some smaller boats are nimble enough to actually take a halyard, attach it to shore and pull the mast over. Obviously, if this is possible, you shouldn't be up on it. I just don't know, with your particular boat.

Rock climbing would certainly help with knots and agility. There are some things pretty unique to climbing a mast, like the ballast I mentioned, or preferring a line that goes through a sheave, not a block hanging off a crane, as examples. By the way, always tie a knot to your chair, do not use a shackle.

All the best with your project.
 

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I don't think there's going to be an issue with going up the mast on a 28 footer esp if the OP is of average weight- esp if just to the spreaders.

The angle between spreader and shroud should be equal above and below, ideally, and often there are clamps or the spreader tip is wired onto the shrouds to prevent slippage. If the angle get too far from that shroud tension can cause the spreader to move if the tip is not held fast somehow.

The last thing you want is a slack leeward shroud to detach from the spreader while you're sailing and you fail to notice. The next tack will result in mast failure since the cap shroud is no longer in place.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Tnx about this. The boat has a pretty long and heavy Keel so i doubt it will actually flip, if anything it may lean a bit. Will be carefull though and tie up the boat well before i go up there.

I guessed so about the spreader clamps. Will have to go the first time and see what is actually there and if it can't be fixed, will at least know what to replace.
 

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I am no expert on masts and rigging and such,(but learning fast), but I would think the idea of using the halyard to pull the boat over to one side along a pier or dock may be a good options hen one may still have to use a table or stepladder to work off of , this will also take the preasure off the shroud /spreader you are wanting to adjust,,,also if you just go up the mast you have to reach out to the end of the spreader to deal with it,,,,,just my thoughts on a rainy day....Ralph
 

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Careening a keelboat at the dock is one way to gain an appreciation for what 'righting moment' is all about.

It's very difficult to do, and hard on the halyard sheaves and exit boxes unless you use the Spinnaker halyard - assuming you have one.

Getting a fair lead to a neighbour's dock is tricky. I suppose in tidal areas with a fixed dock you could tie off and let the tide do the work for you, but even then the boat is going to want to skid all over the place as it's pulled over and you need to constantly tend lines. You also need a lot of space (not between fingers) to avoid putting the keel into the float as the boat heels over.

We have done this with a light 24ft/2600 lb/700lb ballast day racer - it was no picnic.

Doing this against a tall pier at low tide is much more do-able, however it's always surprising how tall a rig on even a smallish boat is against a 'tall' pier.

In many ways perhaps renting a manlift is an option.

Going to the spreader tips on a halyard, btw, is no biggie. just have a lanyard you can tie to the shroud, or wrap your legs around it.
 

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I regularly ascend the mast of our 26 foot boat...I couldn't even sway the ship let alone capsize it. Think about the side forces in a good wind.

If it's the outboard end of the spreader that is raised, perhaps you can just pull it down from the deck using a long dock stick , or pike pole etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
All good suggestions, thank you. I think pulling down the mast from the dock is a pretty risky job. I don't think i can do that on my own and i can only imagine what forces are needed there. I think climbing up and fixing the issue is the most reasonable approach. Just pulling and pushing the spreader won't fix the issue since i assume there is an assembly which holds the line there and clamps it.

Anyways, while the climb rig arrives (i suppose i will need one in the future since i still need to install the Radar, Antenna and other things to the mast)i have plenty to do inside and out of the boat :)

Did a small sail today, just with the main sail at half reef. Was pretty exciting. Wasn't pushing the boat a lot, just to do a simple sail.

Yes, i do have the Main Sail, Jib (i am assuming it is the jib as it has a pretty hefty line inside it and shackles to slide on the fore stay, Spinnaker and one other sail which looks like a jib but as i am not a very experienced sailor yet i haven't figured out what that one is.

Also besides the Jib halyard i have one more rope which is on the very last pulley and is sort - of tied in a loop, i suppose that one is for raising the spinnaker? Don't have a pole for the spinnaker though. Am assuming i have an asymmetric spinnaker but haven't even opened it up yet. Still have some way as i am sailing slowly and raising each sail litle by litle every time. Also had to rig the sails my self as there was noone to help. Few books and some common sence did the trick though.
 

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I just did this Friday. The yard didn't adjust the spreaders when they set the mast last week and both spreaders were angled down by 10 degrees or more.
So before tuning, I just climbed to the spreaders (with both main and Spinnaker halyard attached for help and safety) and nudged the spreaders into place before tuning the rig. Took about 5-7 minutes total.

Our boat is 30ft and the climb is pretty easy and the boats feels totally solid with me up the mast (I'm about 180#).

I think most 28ft boats with reasonable keels would be fine too.

Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk
 

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.....
Also besides the Jib halyard i have one more rope which is on the very last pulley and is sort - of tied in a loop, i suppose that one is for raising the spinnaker? Don't have a pole for the spinnaker though. Am assuming i have an asymmetric spinnaker but haven't even opened it up yet. Still have some way as i am sailing slowly and raising each sail litle by litle every time. Also had to rig the sails my self as there was no one to help. Few books and some common sence did the trick though.
If the third halyard is on an external pulley at the masthead it's likely your spinnaker halyard. Probably tied off in a loop because it's not in use.

Take your spinnaker out of the bag and fold it in half on the ground lengthwise. If the clews (lower corners) line up you have a symmetrical and will need a pole.. if not it will be a cruising spinnaker of some sort that can be flown off the bow of the boat on a tack line - no pole.
 
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While I agree that climbing to the spreaders is much less leverage, I've been assuming this is a climb to the top, as it's sounded like the rig has never been inspected. Let alone the sheaves, blocks, etc, one would be hanging from.

Maybe I'm a bit biased about lateral stability. I haven't been 180lbs, since I weighed in for football camp during freshman year of high school. I'm never climbing a mast on a 28ft boat. :)
 

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Good points about knowing the condition of the rig before you go up.
I have no issues going up the mast of my 25 footer in calm conditions, you are not going to be swinging back and forth so the weight stays centered over the keel anyway.
I alway put a loop around the mast back to the harness so I can't swing away from the mast.
 

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It would seem the OP will/may have to swing out to the end of the spreader anyway.
 
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