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Discussion Starter #1
The Jeanneau Poker i got came with a Teak deck which was laid out by the previous owner and i suppose hasn't been cared for for at least 5 years, on the Fiberglass boat. I am not sure if it was like this from factory but from all the images i have seen of the Poker it doesn't have it. My concern is that the screws which are in some cases poking from the other side within the interior will leak when winter comes. I was considering removing the teak and just repainting the boat deck. The wife says it looks better with the wood but i am the one who has to make sure it is watertight on the deck.

I can see in some places the actual wood is a bit swollen where there are handles on the hatches as well as some light cracks on the edges of the seat. I am not sure what is under the wood nor how well it is sealed.

I was thinking of removing every single screw and adding some caulking and re-screwing to seal it but i don't know if the fiberglass is cracked anywhere or in general what the condition is underneath.

Overall it looks descent except for the caulking needing to be replaced and the wood sanded and perhaps some oil laid over it.

My question is, would you guys suggest i rip it off and seal the deck properly as well as paint it to its white finish? The teak isn't all that new and although i like it, i wouldn't want my interior to be destroyed after the first rain.
 

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Screws protruding through the deck structure??? Doesn't sound good. Hope you got this boat for free - or close to it....

I think I'd get rid of the teak and fill/fair/paint the deck if for no other reason than future peace of mind. Also the added weight of a teak deck on a small boat is not a good thing.
 

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Do you have any photos? I agree that teak on a 28-foot boat would add quite a bit of extra weight. I've heard people on here debate the pros and cons of oiling teak as opposed to letting it weather naturally. Some people say that the oiled teak gets slick and is easier to slip on when the deck gets wet.

I always wonder about the wisdom of any modification that adds more holes to a fiberglass boat on either deck or hull.

Also, thinking about long term maintenance, you will have to make future decisions about how often to refinish the teak and how often you will need to rebed all of the screws. One benefit of removing all the teek is it will significantly reduce those future maintenance tasks.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Tnx guys,

Sorry no photos (was always working on it and didn't make any yet).

I think i will finish sanding and stripping the interior and will remove the teak before i start patching and painting. Will definitely have an ease of mind when i know that there is no water getting in and what is underneath those planks on the deck :)
 

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This sounds like a DIY job done poorly. Assuming you have a cored deck, it is almost certainly full of water. Get the teak off and see what you are dealing with.
 

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Because it sounds like a previous owner added the deck I wonder if it's really solid teak or plywood ? Can you see the edges or judge the thickness ? In a perfect world you'd want to strip, fill all the holes, then have to address the deck surface itself. This is a large size time sucker, if the PO glued AND screwed the deck down, it could be REALLY tough.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
From the looks of it it really is teak, about 5 - 5mm thick though. I think i'll just remove it all as i really want to make sure the boat is watertight. Don't like holes i cannot see anyways.
 

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Hard to tell if it was glued down. If it was, it would be a nightmare to return it to non-skid. I bet the teak hasn't swollen around the handles, rather the surrounding decking has worn away.

I see a row of bungs in one of the pics. Do you have them about every 12-18 inches along the entire length? If so, it was definitely screwed down and you stand a chance it wasn't glued as well. However, even a glued deck has some screws to hold down the ends. When a premade sheet is used, screws are often set through the grooves to hold it down, while the glue dries. These should be removed afterward and the holes filled, but often are not. The black caulk is frequently applied over the screw heads, which is not ideal.

All screwed down decks leak. If there is enough thickness, you could reef out all the black caulk, replace the bungs, trowel in new caulk and power sand the deck. Caulking the edges requires some masking.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The thing is that the bolts which are supposed to be filled, are not removed and most are sticking through the fiberglass interior. Also in some places like in the cockpit i can even see large hols covered by the teak. My suspicion is that the bolts waren't removed, the water got into the interior and this is why i am peeling away with a multitool the paint from the interior hull right now.

The only thing i am afraid of is that when i do the interior, i don't know how watertight the deck is or in what state it is underneath. So i don't mind sanding down the deck and repainting it . The Teak does look nice but would need lots of fixing so i am in a bit of a crossroad here.

My thought was to remove everything that looks dodgy and make the boat is it was intended. Teak is nice and all but i am just not sure it was installed properly, it is pretty worn away and would need as you mentioned sanding, caucking and removing all those bolts and resealing.
 

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It's a dilemna for sure. The problem with removal is how you then repair the fiberglass decking below. If adhesive was used it will need to be ground down, fared out with epoxy, then have a non-skid surface reapplied. Even if not glued down, all the caulking will leave a major mess and you might end up with the same restoration.

If it were me, I would get her sailing safely before I bothered. It may also be worth checking for deck delamination, if water is getting through the screw holes.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The water is definately getting through the screws. Good thing is that it almost never rains here.

Removing the wood and sanding down the deck isn't a problem. I can see the caucking breaking down and if this how it is all over the boat then it shouldn't be difficult witha rotary sander and some elbow grease.

I just don't want to spend all my time on making the interior look nice and when winter comes have it all filled with water with the first rain.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Here is another shot of the teak. Already it is coming up.

What i was thinking is to redo the whole top, remove the teak, fix and restore the deck and use the teak for the interior since it really is hard to get it where i am. Just don't trust it being watertight and safe when winter comes.

My philosophy is that if it doesn't look like it would withstand a storm, then it isn't good enough :) I May be wrong though.
 

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The split in the board is what looks bad to me. Caulking and screws can all be redone (usually).

Just don't underestimate what it will take to remove it all and reapply the non-skid below. It's a major project, even if you don't find delamination. If you are seeing water through the screw holes, it's almost impossible not to have some. That will mean skinning back the top layer of fiberglass, replacing core material and redoing the glass work, otherwise your deck will be squishy under your foot. Worst case, your deck fitting could pull out. May not be worth it.
 

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Most screwed down teak decks can be over-hauled and be re-made to 'water tight' - drill out the bungs (portable drill press using a 3/8" 'forstner' bit to drill), remove the screws, remove the strakes, inspect for rot in the core, slightly 'mill' the strakes and epoxy them back down using sand bags to hold in place during the epoxy 'cure', re-bung (no screws needed), caulk the seams, sand the deck ... and then use a deck 'sealer' evermore to prevent UV burn and erosion of the surface.

The first thing Id inspect is for water dripping down from any of those screws that penetrate through the bottom underside skin of the deck. This will determine if the core will also need to be replaced. If the core is wet and also needs to be replaced and new core installed - this is a backbreaking arduous job that will have to be done whether you reinstall the teak or not.

Second and probably most important is to determine which type of screws were used. Most decks are screwed down with 'shoulder' screws - the threads of the screws DO NOT 'run' the entire length of the screw length but leave a small non-threaded length 'just under' the head of the screw. This is to allow thermal expansion of the wood; however WHEN the wood becomes thinner and the screws are driven deeper the (thread free) shoulder portion will not 'hold' into the fiberglass and every damn deeper driven screw can be a source of a leak into the core when the 'caulk' on the underside of the teak strake becomes loose. If 'sheet metal' screws (full length threads) were used, screw leakage into the core is usually not a problem. If 'shoulder' screws were used and there's not much of thread engagement of those threads into the fiberglass deck top skin and the wood is now much thinner and only the caulk on the underside of the teak strakes is holding the strakes to the deck - definitely rip off the deck in its entirety.
If sheet metal screws were used, you have a chance of a successful overhaul of the teak; but at a minimum, Id remove all those 'too long' screws and seal those penetrations through the bottom skin with thickened epoxy.

An 'overhaul' is usually less time consuming ... but will not correct a 'wet core'. Since a lot of your deck bottom skin is already penetrated by too long screws, pull a few and investigate for core rot. For those areas not penetrated, simply use a VERY small diameter drill bit and 'investigate' from the underside - wet brown drillings from the deck underside will make you 'very sad'.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Hm. Ok. I suppose it is worth trying to fix this. Perhaps it isn't that bad. I guess hosing down the deck and seeing what is happening on the bottom won't damage anything.

If i remove the screws, what is the best way to seal those holes? Use caucking on the hole and screw it back down to seal it or use epoxy in every hole and then screw back? If i want to go through each screw to make sure they are watertight, i would remove the screw, add Caucking in the hole and then rescrew the bolt? Then if it is poking from the other side, trim the tip?
 

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I think I'm still in the 'remove it' camp. With the teak gone you can properly survey the deck surface, get a better idea of any damage or water penetration, fill and fair the holes and end up with a better nonskid and a cooler boat esp if you use a light colour on deck.

It's unlikely much of that wood will be reusable below, esp if its been glued as well as screwed.

If you do decide to keep it be sure to get a router and clean up the overhanging edges on the hatches and cockpit - you can see it's already split away, probably from people stepping on the unsupported edges.

But at the end of the day I think you'd be happier with it gone..
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I suppose i will have to see.

The thing is that in the cockpit, on the side seats i was working on closing up the holes from an old throttle assembly and there is teak there on those seats. Well when i looked below the compartment, there were 3 about 2 Intch holes in the fiberglass just as if someone ripped off something through the surface.

The teak was installed on top of that.

So my theory is that if someone was bored enough to not even bother closing up those holes, then what i can expect from the rest of the work.

I come to the boat every morning and do some work on it, and under the rudder assembly those compartments have always some water just because there is humidity on the seats which i suppose leaks through the teak to the inside.

Anyways, will have to see what to do. I am all for removing this teak and honestly removing or fixing the core isn't all that difficult for me. The boat is relatively small and i don't think the entire core is gone.

Will be pondering about this while i replace bulkheads and making cabinets in the interior.

One more thing. The rigging, some veins for the jib and some handles are fixed to the Teak deck. I can see the teak being swallen on those spots, the rails which also are fixed between the teak became slack and even the rigging fixtures have swallen edges. I just can't imagine how i can tighten those things without a steady and solid base.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
One more thing i wanted to ask.

Why should i paint the deck with Non Skid? Can't i just paint it with a normal deck paint and then add NonSkid material on top in selected areas? My thinking is that it will be more difficult to sand down a non skid paint (of which there is a very small selection here) and removing a film of non skid material (sand paper like) is much simpler and the surface remains smooth to seal or sand if needed.

Am i correct on this or am i off?
 

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One more thing i wanted to ask.

Why should i paint the deck with Non Skid? Can't i just paint it with a normal deck paint and then add NonSkid material on top in selected areas? My thinking is that it will be more difficult to sand down a non skid paint (of which there is a very small selection here) and removing a film of non skid material (sand paper like) is much simpler and the surface remains smooth to seal or sand if needed.

Am i correct on this or am i off?
You might want to do a search on this, and check out these threads.

http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/284114-non-skid-deck-pads.html

http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/274218-durabak-non-skid-complete-failure-how-get-rid-stuff.html
 
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