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One would need a dry suit to survive in the conditions mentioned if kayaking etc. Otherwise, you are on your own if you fall overboard in any kind of low temps. Even fisherman in the gulf of Alaska only don drysuits, or equal when it appears the boat is going down!

Marty
 

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Yes, when kayaking in those temps, a dry suit is wisest. However, when the mother ship needs to be abandon, a life raft would be my preference. You can’t don a dry suit very easily, especially in stressful conditions. You must practice putting on a Gumby suit. If the water is flat, a dinghy will work.

The only relevant point about the kayaker was that it takes time to find someone in open water. He reportedly was wearing a pfd and still could not easily be located. You need to buy time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 · (Edited)
So, now that everyone has had a chance to weigh in on the liferaft debate, I will get back to the original purpose of the thread, which was to offer my impressions and experiences with the 39i, which might benefit people who are contemplating purchasing this model in the future!

We just got back from our first holiday on the boat. We spent 2 weeks in the southern Gulf Islands of BC. We were fortunate to have enough wind to sail for almost all of our travel days, although most of it was upwind. While her pointing ability and upwind performance is not quite up to scratch when compared to race prepped boats, she seemed to stack up pretty well among other cruising boats on the water. We were even able to hang with boats that were motor-sailing.

The nice thing about the 39i is that she is just to easy to sail. The small headsail makes tacking upwind much easier than boats with big genoas, although there is still some grinding to do if you have a bad tack. It is nice to be able to do it from the helm position! So far we have found the boat to be incredibly forgiving in all conditions including upwind and close reaching in 25kts of wind. Even when the boat is heeling way more than it should, the helm still responds quickly thanks to her deep, powerful rudder.

We finally got to test out our new A1 Asymetric spinnaker, bowsprit, and top down furler. We had perfect conditions, beam reaching with 11kts apparent wind, and we were trucking along at a respectable 8.5kts with the occasional burst of 9kts in the gusts, all while lunch was laid out on the cockpit table! It was all very civilized! I cant wait to see what she can do with a low drag prop and a new mainsail! I have no doubt we could get her into the double digit boatspeed if we push her harder! When it was time to douse the spinnaker, the furler made it simple and drama-free, and we didnt even have to leave the cockpit!

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Discussion Starter · #46 · (Edited)
Nice looking A-S Sail! If I could afford to move up, the 36i would be getting a really long look. It certainly seems to check a lot of boxes for me. Seems to have a lot in common with the 39.
Yes, I was looking at a 36i that was just down the dock from mine last week. They are very similar on the outside, the biggest difference is the single wheel on the 36i vs the twin wheels on the 39i. The 36 still has the nice wide transom and swim platform.

On the interior it looks like the 39 gains a bit more space and larger closets in the forward and aft staterooms, as well as a larger head and shower stall on the 2 cabin model. The salon and galley look pretty much the same.

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Thanks for sharing your write up. I appreciate your first-hand validation of the other positive comments I’ve read about this model. The SO 39i has been at the top of my shopping list. Unfortunately, they don’t show up for sale often (ever!?!) here in California. Especially in the 3-cabin version I’m looking for. :|
 

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So, now that everyone has had a chance to weigh in on the liferaft debate, I will get back to the original purpose of the thread, which was to offer my impressions and experiences with the 39i, which might benefit people who are contemplating purchasing this model in the future!

We just got back from our first holiday on the boat. We spent 2 weeks in the southern Gulf Islands of BC. We were fortunate to have enough wind to sail for almost all of our travel days, although most of it was upwind. While her pointing ability and upwind performance is not quite up to scratch when compared to race prepped boats, she seemed to stack up pretty well among other cruising boats on the water. We were even able to hang with boats that were motor-sailing.

The nice thing about the 39i is that she is just to easy to sail. The small headsail makes tacking upwind much easier than boats with big genoas, although there is still some grinding to do if you have a bad tack. It is nice to be able to do it from the helm position! So far we have found the boat to be incredibly forgiving in all conditions including upwind and close reaching in 25kts of wind. Even when the boat is heeling way more than it should, the helm still responds quickly thanks to her deep, powerful rudder.

We finally got to test out our new A1 Asymetric spinnaker, bowsprit, and top down furler. We had perfect conditions, beam reaching with 11kts apparent wind, and we were trucking along at a respectable 8.5kts with the occasional burst of 9kts in the gusts, all while lunch was laid out on the cockpit table! It was all very civilized! I cant wait to see what she can do with a low drag prop and a new mainsail! I have no doubt we could get her into the double digit boatspeed if we push her harder! When it was time to douse the spinnaker, the furler made it simple and drama-free, and we didnt even have to leave the cockpit!

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very nice i like it. I am canoe rider i have hobies cat 16'' that was too good for me. Now my canoe is damage due to old now i am finding something batter then this in canoe but you change my mind i am interesting to buy 39i sail can you help to satisfied me as i know that you have great experience of 39i sali and have info about benefits and disadvantages can you explain it.....?
what is safety arrangements and features like speed and other of this boat......?
:cut_out_animated_em
 

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Yes, I was looking at a 36i that was just down the dock from mine last week. They are very similar on the outside, the biggest difference is the single wheel on the 36i vs the twin wheels on the 39i. The 36 still has the nice wide transom and swim platform.

On the interior it looks like the 39 gains a bit more space and larger closets in the forward and aft staterooms, as well as a larger head and shower stall on the 2 cabin model. The salon and galley look pretty much the same.

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SchockT,
Thanks for all the great information. I'm in the process of buying my first "real" boat. I have a 23 ft Trimaran and RS Aero. I've raced on Santa Cruz 70 for about 10 years. I'm looking at a 39i ($149k) that is in Seattle, as well as a Jeanneau 379 ($179k). I'll be single handling almost all the time. Thinking about living aboard. I'm single, 60's no kids, retired.

Planning to spend the next 6 months sailing Puget Sound, gunkholing up and down from Olympia to Neah Bay. After I get my skills up I want to sail offshore to Baja, Hawaii.... Is the 39i or 379 up to the challenge? Also, anymore upgrades to your 39i?
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 · (Edited)
SchockT,
Thanks for all the great information. I'm in the process of buying my first "real" boat. I have a 23 ft Trimaran and RS Aero. I've raced on Santa Cruz 70 for about 10 years. I'm looking at a 39i ($149k) that is in Seattle, as well as a Jeanneau 379 ($179k). I'll be single handling almost all the time. Thinking about living aboard. I'm single, 60's no kids, retired.

Planning to spend the next 6 months sailing Puget Sound, gunkholing up and down from Olympia to Neah Bay. After I get my skills up I want to sail offshore to Baja, Hawaii.... Is the 39i or 379 up to the challenge? Also, anymore upgrades to your 39i?
I think both boats would be more than capable of going to Hawaii assuming they were properly equipped for offshore. Obviously I am partial to the 39i over the next generation 379, but if I was looking at those models I would probably look at the 389, which is the same boat as the 379 with the addition of a bowsprit strong enough to fly a spinnaker or code zero from.

I have been doing lots of upgrades on Azura. Recently I have upgraded the battery bank from maintenance free flooded lead acid to Firefly Carbon Foam AGMs. I have also installed a Xantrex Freedom XC Pro inverter/charger that provides 100a charging and 2000w inverter. I am in the process of mounting 2x160w Renogy ultra flexible solar panels on the bimini, controlled by a Victron MPPT smart controller. The goal is to make the boat energy independent off-grid without the need to run the engine for charging.

Once that is done I might take a break on the spending for a while....the house needs some attention too! (Although a new jib would be nice!)

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
I should also mention that I did end up installing a Flexofold folding prop, and it made a huge difference to the sailing performance, and it also significantly reduced the propwalk compared to the fixed prop. We are very happy with that particular upgrade.

After we got the prop we were able to have a rematch of the race I related earlier this thread. This time it was a very light wind race. It was a pursuit start so slower boats went first. I started at the same time as the SF37 and a Sabre 42 and we left them in our wake! They could not get going at all and ultimately retired from the race, while wee proceeded to catch up to and pass most of the fleet, including a Sun Odyssey 35 with full race sails. (He was given a huge head start to compensate for his lack of racing experience!)

I was quite pleased with Azura's light air performance!

In the pic those specks in the distance started at the same time as us, the SO35 in the foreground had a massive head start and we rolled him easily! It was a wet, rainy race, but we were comfy and dry under our bimini having lunch as we rolled a J30 who looked we and miserable!


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SchockT,

Thanks for the quick reply. I agree that the 389 with the bowsprit would be a nice addition. However, I'm leaning toward saving money on the initial purchase and then using it to upgrade the charging system by adding solar, maybe wind, maybe hydrogenerator.

Also thinking about a bowthruster, as I will be single handed most of the time. Doug Bostrum, over at the Jeanneau-Owners forum did a nice install on his 39i, 5 years ago and seems happy. I'm getting registered on that forum now. Many of my old sailor friends laugh at the idea of a thruster in a 40 foot boat. But they have 30 years of boat driving experience. I just want to go out and sail without the worry of getting in and out of the moorage.

On your 39i, do you have any concerns about the outside shrouds not allowing you to sheet in enough to point high?

Thanks,
Jon
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
SchockT,

Thanks for the quick reply. I agree that the 389 with the bowsprit would be a nice addition. However, I'm leaning toward saving money on the initial purchase and then using it to upgrade the charging system by adding solar, maybe wind, maybe hydrogenerator.

Also thinking about a bowthruster, as I will be single handed most of the time. Doug Bostrum, over at the Jeanneau-Owners forum did a nice install on his 39i, 5 years ago and seems happy. I'm getting registered on that forum now. Many of my old sailor friends laugh at the idea of a thruster in a 40 foot boat. But they have 30 years of boat driving experience. I just want to go out and sail without the worry of getting in and out of the moorage.

On your 39i, do you have any concerns about the outside shrouds not allowing you to sheet in enough to point high?

Thanks,
Jon
Yeah I know the thruster install you are referring to. I am on that forum as well, under the name Zaphod. There are a couple of threads about upgrades to the 39i.

Personally a thruster is low on my list, but I can see the appeal.

The outboard shrouds do not affect sheeting angles at all because the sailplan uses a non overlapping jib not a genoa. The jib sheet runs inside the upper shroud. The downside is that it limits your headsail size, but the boat was never designed to use a genoa. As previously noted, the small headsail makes short handed upwind sailing much easier.

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I'm admiring your new battery install. Very professional. Good to know the outside shrouds aren't a problem and it sounds like the boat has good light wind performance, which surprises me. From the data sheets, the 39i weighs more than the 379 and has a smaller sail plan. So I was expecting relatively poor light wind performance.

Tomorrow, I'm scheduled to look at the 39i "Off Call" that is for sale. Any advice as to any special things to look for?
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
I'm admiring your new battery install. Very professional. Good to know the outside shrouds aren't a problem and it sounds like the boat has good light wind performance, which surprises me. From the data sheets, the 39i weighs more than the 379 and has a smaller sail plan. So I was expecting relatively poor light wind performance.

Tomorrow, I'm scheduled to look at the 39i "Off Call" that is for sale. Any advice as to any special things to look for?
The only known issue that comes to mind is the bottom transom step. When the boats were built there was an opening in the fiberglass, and that opening was closed with a piece of plywood, and then the teak was laid on top. If the caulking is compromised on the teak decking then water gets under the teak and the plywood rots out. It is a relatively simple repair, and shouldn't be a deal breaker but a bargaining chip. You can get a look at the underside of that step by crawling to the back of the starboard side aft berth and removing the access panel you find on the bulkhead. The opening is big enough to get your upper body through. You will probably find the forced air heater back there if equipped, as well as seeing some of the steering gear.

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The only known issue that comes to mind is the bottom transom step. When the boats were built there was an opening in the fiberglass, and that opening was closed with a piece of plywood, and then the teak was laid on top. If the caulking is compromised on the teak decking then water gets under the teak and the plywood rots out. It is a relatively simple repair, and shouldn't be a deal breaker but a bargaining chip. You can get a look at the underside of that step by crawling to the back of the starboard side aft berth and removing the access panel you find on the bulkhead. The opening is big enough to get your upper body through. You will probably find the forced air heater back there if equipped, as well as seeing some of the steering gear.

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Thanks for the info. You're encyclopedic knowledge is very much appreciated.
Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
Lol! I'm not sure I would call it encyclopedic knowledge, I am just sharing what I have learned! I have spent quite a bit of time crawling around exploring the nooks and cranies. There are still a number of panels and compartments I haven't opened up yet!

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Discussion Starter · #60 ·
I'm admiring your new battery install. Very professional. Good to know the outside shrouds aren't a problem and it sounds like the boat has good light wind performance, which surprises me. From the data sheets, the 39i weighs more than the 379 and has a smaller sail plan. So I was expecting relatively poor light wind performance.

Tomorrow, I'm scheduled to look at the 39i "Off Call" that is for sale. Any advice as to any special things to look for?
I was just looking at the listing for Off Call. That is a really nice 39i! The Grey hull looks great! Low engine hours are nice and it looks pretty spotless! The spinnaker and bowsprit are a nice bonus. That is what will make up for the small sailplan when sailing off the wind. If you don't snap that up I am sure it will sell quickly. It is amazing that they are going for the same price they were selling for 2.5 years ago when we were buying.

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