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Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Jeanneau sailboats for sale by owner.

Just happened to be browsing here the other day, and noticed you could get a 51' Jeanneau for less then $100,000. WOAH.

Compared to any other boat claiming to be a blue water boat of the same age,
Tayana sailboats for sale by owner.
$100,000K will only get you a 42' Tayana, that is 8 years older.
For a boat in the same range and age your looking at $300,000.
Am I missing something or are these Jeanneau boats aging like an open bottle of wine?

Looks like you can score a 52' Tayana for $200,000
 

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Saw the two at $150K+, but not the one at $100K. What exactly is your question? Tayana's and Jeanneau are much different makers, especially 20+ years ago.

Many of the French boats of that era, and this era for that matter, were made for the charter trade. The boat in Mexico with 4 cabins and 4 heads screams charter to me. So, charter it for 5-10 years+, then put it to other use for 10+ years, and the price may be right. Not many Tayana's in the charter trade.
 

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Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Question is, should a person looking for a yacht for themselves, be looking at a boat like this.
Your right, I do not know of any tayanas in charter.
That in itself may be enough reason to not buy a new one for yourself.
Who is going to buy your well loved boat that is 20 years old, when there are ex charter boats for half price?
 

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I don't see a Jeanneau 51 for 100k, although there is one in Mexico for 160k . I also see a Tayana 54 around the same age for $200k...

When you see an unusually cheap boat you have to look at the details. Where is the boat? What condition is it in? How desperate is the seller? I don't think you can judge a manufacturer's entire product line based on the asking price of a couple of 20 year old models. A lot can happen to a boat in 20 years!

You also have to look at the original purchase prices of the boats you are comparing. Does a new Tayana go for the same price as a new Jeanneau?
 

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The 20 year old well loved Jeanneau from today is a lot different than the 20 year old Jeanneau that was in charter. Hours on engine (s), wear and tear a lot different than a personal craft whether live aboard or not, etc. makes the difference.

There are many people that buy boats out of charter after 5 years, refit them, and they are fine. Hopefully a buyer of this type of boat is smart enough to do their due diligence. They will definetely find lots of things to consider.

A beautiful new Jeanneau 54 DS is a lot different animal than a Tayana of any vintage. Space is amazing. Different strokes for different folks.
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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UP,

I am not sure precisely what you are trying to say but you are comparing Tayanas which are generally very well built, and equipped, and which generally are truely capable long distance cruisers to Jenneaus which are comparatively lightly constructed coastal cruisers that are aimed at the value oriented marketplace.

For many people, who are mostly doing light coastal cruising, value oriented boats like Jenneaus, Hunters, Beneteaus, and Catalinas work just fine.

But, as TomandChris pointed out, there is very good chance that the bargain-priced Jeanneaus were in the charter trade, which normally implies under equipped and beat to death. Having ridden shotgun through a few charterboat rehabs, I would have to say that the Tayanas at twice the initial price are probably way more than twice the boat for less money invested by the time you have put the Jenneau into an equal condition. At that point you are stuck with a Jenneau that has way to much invested in it to ever recoup a reasonable % of the expenditures because the value of the Jenneaus are limited by what they are.

Jeff
 

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Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Your very correct jeff, but many do a circumnavigation on a Jeanneau.
Tayana is one example, based on jeaneau calling themselves a true blue water boat.
Not sure if a catalina was ever sold as such? I would use the jeanneau along the coast, but for a transpac i would not.
 

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Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
A beautiful new Jeanneau 54 DS is a lot different animal than a Tayana of any vintage. Space is amazing. Different strokes for different folks.
very true, they do a nice open look with huge flat open cockpits. great for days at the dock, not so much for force 10 seas. I like my twin forward bulkheads, rudder post isolated from the rest of the boat, aft bulkhead, and well attached keel, and rudder. I will take the smaller looking interior, with tons of storage and large tanks to a dock queen, but hey. everyone likes something different. Its not just tayanas, I enjoy a well built boat, with a lot of woodwork down below, and above.
 

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Re: Jeanneau, the worst bost for the money?

So, bottom line, this thread was your way of saying that your Tayana brand is so much better? Tayana is a great boat as designed, and if kept to standards, it continues to be a great boat.There are also crappy Tayana's out there waiting for someone to buy them...just not as many.

I know a couple that is out there now with a Jeanneau 54. I don't think that they are stupied enough, with all the equipment they have on board, to get into force 10, but force 8 certainly and the boat has come through just fine.

I know from previous threads on this and other boards that you KNOW that your boat will handle 30' breaking seas. I also know that you have turned back because of 8' breaking waves being over your crews limit. I give you credit for your dream, and the work you are attempting to upgrade your boat. However, a year ago you were planning your 6 day trip from NY to south Florida and you are now where? St. Augustine? How much of that did you actually sail?
 

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Who is going to buy your well loved boat that is 20 years old, when there are ex charter boats for half price?
Because ex-charter boats, sometimes no matter the age, are usually not so well-loved.

Aren't you comparing apples (Tayana) and oranges (Jeanneau)?
 

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Clearly the purpose of this thread is to express his disdain for Jeanneaus and boats like them. Calling them "dock queens" implies that if you own one then you must spend all your time tied up sipping cocktails. You are clearly not a real sailor like a Tayana owner is!

Get over yourself! People choose the boats based on the type of sailing they want to do, and different types of sailing require different compromises. Of course a properly equipped blue water boat is going to cost more than a coastal cruiser! On the other hand just because you bought a "blue water" boat doesn't make you a superior sailor, nor does it make your boat a superior boat when you are not crossing oceans.

I am sure a well equipped Jeanneau 51 is capable of going anywhere a similarly equipped Tayana can go. It will probably even get there faster! And while they are waiting for you to arrive they can kick back and enjoy that nice comfy cockpit!
 

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Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Re: Jeanneau, the worst bost for the money?

So, bottom line, this thread was your way of saying that your Tayana brand is so much better? Tayana is a great boat as designed, and if kept to standards, it continues to be a great boat.There are also crappy Tayana's out there waiting for someone to buy them...just not as many.

I know a couple that is out there now with a Jeanneau 54. I don't think that they are stupied enough, with all the equipment they have on board, to get into force 10, but force 8 certainly and the boat has come through just fine.

I know from previous threads on this and other boards that you KNOW that your boat will handle 30' breaking seas. I also know that you have turned back because of 8' breaking waves being over your crews limit. I give you credit for your dream, and the work you are attempting to upgrade your boat. However, a year ago you were planning your 6 day trip from NY to south Florida and you are now where? St. Augustine? How much of that did you actually sail?
nah, not a Tayana praise thread. Just another reason I think jeanneau is a junk boat for offshore work.

You may view our entire voyage on our blog, nothing is hidden, and I am ashamed of nothing. 1/3 of the voyage had enough wind to sail, 2/3rds was offshore. The crew is still learning to adapt to bad seas, and she cannot wait to get back out again for another long trip. I am hoping she will be promoted soon, and we can move to the next location, as St Augustine is quite boring after the second month. I am glad we are here at a dock for a while, I had a lot of projects, both ascetic and mechanical, to do.

This has little to do with us thou, and a lot to do with yacht sale prices, and value holding ability.

To be honest, I am a fan of Albin Vega 27's. I am a complete fanboy. I like those more then Tayana.
 

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Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I am sure a well equipped Jeanneau 51 is capable of going anywhere a similarly equipped Tayana can go. It will probably even get there faster! And while they are waiting for you to arrive they can kick back and enjoy that nice comfy cockpit!
I like that comment :)
I bet its faster, so is a volvo ocean racer. When the weather gets rough, do they keep going flat out in their jeanneau? How does it handle the big waves? I am truely curious, and would not pass up a chance to sail on one so I may compare. All of the old salts I have talked to say going heavy increases comfort. It does decrease speed.

I challenge the Jeanneau to a drake passage, when they arrive in Antarctica they can sip all the cockpit cocktails they want.
 

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This is just one more instance of your asking a question, getting input, and then going with what you wanted to think in the first place. Your perceptions of yourself, your abilities, and your boat are far to inflated for reality. You are either one of those people that is dangerous to others because of their inflated opinions of their ability....or one of those people that talk about the adventure until you find an excuse not to make the adventure a reality. My bet is on both!

Currently you still have a potentially nice Tayana in need of a lot of work...and she is a dock queen. Bet your neighbors love her. Play some movies about the roaring 40's on your wide screen and pretend you are an expert.
 

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What type of boat is your Union Pacific? I’ve looked at your Blog, but it isn’t very evident. An “about us” or “Union Pacific” tab would greatly enhance the blog IMHO. Perhaps you can also provide a synopsis of your trip down the coast because, when I read it, it sounded that you were doing harbor hopping and not an offshore passage in the classic sense. For what it’s worth, I’ve been to both Horta and Gran Caneria, and there a lot of Beneteau and Jeanneau boats in both.
 

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So is Antarctica your next destination? Somehow I doubt that! I don't think I would take either boat there even if I was interested in such a n adventure.

Comparing a Jeanneau to a VOR boat? Really?:rolleyes:

There are a lot of old salts out there that will tell you a lot of things. Ok sure, in big seas perhaps a Tayana is more comfortable. There are the compromises again. Some are content to go slow and be comfortable when they occasionally get themselves into stinky weather, others would rather go fast and tough it out in the bad stuff, and be more comfortable most of the time.

I am curious, you said that only 1/3 of your last journey had enough wind to sail....how much wind do you need? Do you think a lighter more performance oriented boat might have been able to sail more? Again the compromises!
 

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Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
What type of boat is your Union Pacific? I've looked at your Blog, but it isn't very evident. An "about us" or "Union Pacific" tab would greatly enhance the blog IMHO. Perhaps you can also provide a synopsis of your trip down the coast because, when I read it, it sounded that you were doing harbor hopping and not an offshore passage in the classic sense. For what it's worth, I've been to both Horta and Gran Caneria, and there a lot of Beneteau and Jeanneau boats in both.
Check the facebook page, we have a nice writeup there on what type, designer, ect.
I do not like the limited page format options on blogger.
Then I am not a webpage artist.
Yeah, I think you could call it harbor hopping. We had no generator for the trip and the first 3/4 was freezing cold. If only I would have had 6 more months to prep...
 

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I was on a couple of 10-15 year old Jeanneaus recently, while checking out the fleets of various sailing clubs here. Under gentle usage, they were holding up very nicely - club use is basically daysailing with max a long weekend out per month, nothing longer than ~150 miles and never out in more than 25 knots.

I think that reflects what they were designed for and do admirably. I could believe that amount of time in charter would take a lot more out of a boat, and I could believe a Ty could take a lot more of certain kinds of abuse.
 

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Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I am curious, you said that only 1/3 of your last journey had enough wind to sail....how much wind do you need? Do you think a lighter more performance oriented boat might have been able to sail more? Again the compromises!
We were windless for 1/3. We had nights of motoring that apparent wind, was the only wind. the rest of the time was very rough. In fact we either had the #3 jib up, or nothing. I do not know about a lighter boat, never owned anything light.
 
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