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Hi all,
I'm a Canadian living in northern Alberta (56.7267° N, 111.3790° W)
There is no sailing around here but I have carved out some ocean sailing experience bareboating in the Caribbean and taking ASA course holidays there on Beneteau Cylades 43.3, Oceanis 38, Leopard 39. I have also sailed from Maui to Vancouver as a crew member on a Beneteau First 40.7.
I will be purchasing a 40ft ish sailboat this year to cruise the Caribbean by Nov 2022 with my wife. It will be used and it will be a production boat because thats what fits.
I'm leaning towards a Jeanneau 409 or Oceanis 41. Does the hard chine make that much of a difference over the previous models like the 39i or Oceanis 40?

Jeff
 

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Welcome aboard, second on the no help on the chine, but Maui to Vancouver would be awesome! I have only done tourist sailing around Maui the last 20 years but would love to make it an adventure. Regards, Larry
 

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I'm leaning towards a Jeanneau 409 or Oceanis 41. Does the hard chine make that much of a difference over the previous models like the 39i or Oceanis 40?

Jeff
Hi Jeff, welcome to Sailnet.

I have a 20 year old Beneteau 393 which does not have the hard chine.
As they started popping onto the scene I did wonder about them... and catamarans now invariably have them.

I spoke to someone just the other day who wouldn't have a boat without the hard chine. It apparently really increases the interior volume. Just those few inches on the side of the hull makes a difference, and doubled for a mono or quadrupled for a Cat.
My boat is 13 feet in the beam, a 6 inch chine makes the boat a foot wider... thats near 10% increased width.

Theres probably some other production reason too, quicker, easier, cheaper to build etc, more space less dollars etc.

People keep telling me that old boats are better. I say to them that engineers haven't been sitting on their buts for the past few hundred years. Every model is a new innovation that becomes indispensable.

Yesterday I sailed past Stad Amsterdam and looked at it (as did every other boat sailing the bay!!) and thought "Ahhhhhhhhhhhhh The Age of Sail!" Then I worked out that it was probably the age of sail for about 5 years only. And really not the age of sail at all but the battle of the steam ships.
Its a steel hull so it wouldn't even creak romantically.

Buy the chine. :)




Water Sky Boat Cloud Vehicle


BTW the black blob in the rigging amidships that looks like a second anchoring buoy was a blue diesel engine being swung aboard. Too small for main power so I guess a generator or pump etc. Even the age of sail has modernised...


Mark
 
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