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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Haven't been able to get down to the boat for a couple of weeks. I'm trying to determine my options for kids playing in the water this weekend. Are the jellyfish here yet, specifically in the Rhode river? The sea nettle prediction map doesn't look too bad.

Thanks,
-Joe
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the info. Kids enjoyed themselves in the water today. And I didn't have to explain to them they were free to swim but may feel some slight stinging sensations.

We did have to swim with a few rays though.
 

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I dove the hull on Sunday too. Nothing as far south as Lodge Creek off the Yeocomico off the Potomac.

I think all the rain has kept them down. It's usually wall to wall nettles by now.
 

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Jellyfish/sea nettles need a combination of salinity and high levels of nutrients in order to thrive. Usually, they have both in most of Chesapeake Bay, but once you get above Pooles Island the water is a bit too fresh for them, even on a dry year.

When the bay was relatively clean and clear, which the last time I recall, was in the early 1960s, sea nettles only arrived once every 7 years, and the timing usually coincided with drought conditions. The increased nutrient levels were also a byproduct of the drought, mainly because there was insufficient fresh water flowing into the bay to flush out the nutrients that had accumulated in the bay's tributaries. I remember when Back River was so algae covered that it resembled someone's lawn.

Personally, there is no place in the confines of Chesapeake Bay that I consider safe for swimming. Apparently, the EPA and other agencies agree. That's why nearly every public beach in the bay's upper and middle reaches has been closed for decades and will never reopen. Yes, the fecal-coliform count is that high.

Good luck,

Gary :cool:
 

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This is straying a bit off topic but Gary said, "That's why nearly every public beach in the bay's upper and middle reaches has been closed for decades and will never reopen."

Ferry Beach (Rock Hall), Betterton Beach and Sandy Point Beach are all open as far as I know. They are tested regularly. That said, I just read that there have been at least 4 reported cases of Vibrio this year, mostly watermen on the Choptank, so don't go in the water with an open wound of any sort.

Mary Lou
Rhodes 22 Fretless
Rock Hall, MD
 

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so don't go in the water with an open wound of any sort.

Mary Lou
Rhodes 22 Fretless
Rock Hall, MD
A very good point..don't dive/swim with open wounds in fresh water waters..and if cut by marine life like barnacles clean immediately and if redness and pain develops seek immediate medical attention...
 

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Jellyfish/sea nettles need a combination of salinity and high levels of nutrients in order to thrive. Usually, they have both in most of Chesapeake Bay, but once you get above Pooles Island the water is a bit too fresh for them, even on a dry year.

When the bay was relatively clean and clear, which the last time I recall, was in the early 1960s, sea nettles only arrived once every 7 years, and the timing usually coincided with drought conditions. The increased nutrient levels were also a byproduct of the drought, mainly because there was insufficient fresh water flowing into the bay to flush out the nutrients that had accumulated in the bay's tributaries. I remember when Back River was so algae covered that it resembled someone's lawn.

Personally, there is no place in the confines of Chesapeake Bay that I consider safe for swimming. Apparently, the EPA and other agencies agree. That's why nearly every public beach in the bay's upper and middle reaches has been closed for decades and will never reopen. Yes, the fecal-coliform count is that high.

Good luck,

Gary :cool:
Gary can you prove this outrageous generalization with some real facts. From my contacts Chesterton, Betterton, Worton all test their waters regularly.

Maybe the Susquehanna and the western shore are dirty, but I know many places on the Eastern Shore that are safe and ok
 

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That's a useful statement.

I just removed fist-sized clumps of algae from my keel last weekend, and was stunned by the speed and amount of growth. I wasn't sure if I was doing something wrong, or if others had the same experience.

The West/Rhode Riverkeeper tests every Wednesday and posts the results here: West/Rhode Riverkeeper - Enterococcal Bacteria Testing

Gary, I like you but you are an angry curmudgeon, longing for the "good old days". The Bay is in bad enough health without you exaggerating things even further.
 

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I've been cleaning out strainers like mad as well. I don't know if this is unique to the West and Rhode or throughout the mid-Bay. I'm a bit worried about the inlets that don't have strainers like my washdown system. Cleaning out my sink drain thru-hulls did wonders for the time to do dishes and brush my teeth.
 

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I've been cleaning out strainers like made as well. I don't know if this is unique to the West and Rhode or throughout the mid-Bay. I'm a bit worried about the inlets that don't have strainers like my washdown system. Cleaning out my sink drain thru-hulls did wonders for the time to do dishes and brush my teeth.
Weve seen a lot here too
 

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I also have unusually heavy slime on my boat on the Delaware River. I spoke to a very knowledgeable liveaboard who used to dive on bottoms professionally, and he noted that water clarity is unusually high this summer. Water temps on the Delaware would normally be around 85 now, but it is 77 right now. That suppresses growth of suspended algae, resulting in lower turbidity. But that extra clarity allows sunlight to hit the hull beneath the waterline, which heats the hull and adjacent water and feeds the photosynthesis, encouraging algae growth on the hull surface.

It's just a theory, but it seems to match what we're seeing. As for water clarity, I can easily see all the way to the base of my outboard, and even further down on my transom hung rudder.
 

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sv Cordelia
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I was anchored in the Rhode this weekend. Didn't see any nettles and there were a lot of folks in the water - though I wasn't one of them. A dockmate said he saw one last weekend over in the Miles, but just one.

As far as growth, my waterline is in pretty good shape - though I have scrubbed it twice this season - but my speed wheel clogged after two weeks. It usually hangs in until mid-May before getting bad enough to zero-out.

I did notice my motoring speed was slower than usual. So, I suspect it's either growth below my water line or on my prop. Barnacles were pretty bad last year for me.
 

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No growth in the mouth of the Susquehanna River - YET! It will come, but there is so much water being released through Conowingo Dam this year that most of the mud has even washed from beneath my boat and I can now get in and out at low tide for the first time in two years.

As for being an old curmudgeon, yeah, I freely admit to that sin. I kinda liked prying oysters from the old bay bridge pilings back in the 1960s with a tire iron and slurping them fresh, right on my boat. Damned, those were truly the good old days.

Cheers,

Gary :cool:
 
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