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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My Jib is ripping as it catches on the ladder that is also the rigging on my sailboat. Is there something that I can attach to the ladder to prevent it from catching?

I've added a picture on page 2. Thanks for looking.

Thanks
 

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What 'ladder'? Where is it?

Is it only the sail that's catching or are the sheets catching as well? Obviously tearing the sail on a routine tack is not a good thing, and generally it's easy to avoid. Pictures or more detail will help.
 

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islander bahama 24
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Please post pictures I'm trying to visualise where on the rigging there is a needed ladder on an O'Day 27
 

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Old as Dirt!
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My Jib is ripping as it catches on the ladder that is also the rigging on my sailboat. Is there something that I can attach to the ladder to prevent it from catching?

Thanks
Google "Baggywrinkle". Learn how to make it using small stuff from old cast off line and wrap your shrouds with the material, and tightly near/at the ends of the risers. (If you are using solid risers between the shrouds, you would be wise to dispense with them and learn how to seaze "rat-lines" in their stead--Google again).

FWIW...
 
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Once known as Hartley18
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Google "Baggywrinkle". Learn how to make it using small stuff from old cast off line and wrap your shrouds with the material, and tightly near/at the ends of the risers/rat-lines.
Baggywrinkle is used to prevent chafe.

It will do nothing to prevent lines snagging on rigging (and might even make the problem worse). FWIW..
 

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Baggywrinkle is used to prevent chafe.

It will do nothing to prevent lines snagging on rigging (and might even make the problem worse). FWIW..

Ah... Wrong. BTDT got the T-Shirt.
 

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Must be the escape ladder.

Yep, we need a photo
 

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While not common now, there was a time when many would rig "rungs" between the fore'n aft lower shrouds to form a "ladder" by which one could climb up to near the lower (or only) spreaders to give one a view of the water ahead for piloting or a better position for a look about. These were often made with wooden slats with a groove on either end that laid flat, resting on Bull Dog clamps and held in place with seizings. Other versions consisted of two slats, often 1" x 2" facing one another vertically with U-bolts passing throuth the slats on either side of the shroud cables. While these "ladders" had some merit as to giving one a better "look out", what they had in common was a tendency for the leach of the jib to hook the ends of the risers/slats, as one tacked, and eventually tear. We had such an arrangement on the lower shrouds of our 1963 era Rhodes Reliant in the early '70's. During his visit to San Francisco in late '69 on Wanderer III (similarly fitted), Eric Hiscock put us onto the inexpensive "fix" with the making of Baggywrinkle which one wrapped from above, over, and below the ends of the risers that allowed the sail to just slide over the ends without damage (and to some, then, looked very "shippy").

While solid risers had there uses, they had the disadvantage of being "sliperly" (as my daughter used to say), particularly when wet, as well as hard on the sails. Rat lines, siezed to the shrouds with coach whipping--two lines per step, bound together between the shrouds by square knots, the end of one coach whipped up the shroud for a few inches and the other down--had the advantage of being less sliperly. They would "sag" under one's step, somewhat cradling the arch of one's foot when in use and they had no effect on the sails, and they also looked "shippy" for those that cared.

While 27' might be a bit small for a rigging ladder of any height, I have seen them on such small boats before; and, in fact, the Hiscock's had rigging ladders on their 8-ton 30' Wanderer II with which they made the first circumnavigation in the early 1950's.

(Of course, after all the rubbish of this discourse, we will discover that the OP was not, in fact, referring to a rigging ladder, but to stirrups bolted to his mast, or some such arrangement, eh?)
 

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If its rungs between the shrouds as well as, or instead of, a baggywrinkle could you use a roller to move the rubbing part outboard?

They clip over the shroud/lifeline etc


Sail Saver Jib Roller
6mm Wide
63mm Long

Forespar Sail Saver prevents sails from snagging and chaffing on spreader tips, shrouds and lifelines. Molded in tough U.V. Resistant Derin. Easy to install, secured locking rings are included if necessary. The center hole can be drilled to accommodate larger shroud diameters (3/16" - 3/8"). Sold in pairs.
Annapolis Performance Sailing (APS) - Shroud/Lifeline Roller by Ronstan
 

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Personally, I don't think ratlines have a place on any length boat except those pirate ships in the movies, but some people think they look "salty". ;)
To each, his own, right?
Please explain this comment? How would you suggest the crew get aloft to furl or set the topsails, square sails and do maintenance on any tall ship?
Even on a smaller boat, ratlines have value for visibility if one is navigating reefs in uncharted waters. On my gaff ketch, one of the mizzen ratlines was where we stowed the outboard. They certainly beat the hell out of going aloft in a bosun's chair or with climbing rig, on any boat. Not as much a matter of "looking salty" as utility, in my book.
 

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I make sawdust
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Please explain this comment? How would you suggest the crew get aloft to furl or set the topsails, square sails and do maintenance on any tall ship?
Even on a smaller boat, ratlines have value for visibility if one is navigating reefs in uncharted waters. On my gaff ketch, one of the mizzen ratlines was where we stowed the outboard. They certainly beat the hell out of going aloft in a bosun's chair or with climbing rig, on any boat. Not as much a matter of "looking salty" as utility, in my book.
Sorry to offend. I don't sail on tall ships.

Like I said: to each his own.

But, as the original poster queried, if your jib is getting hung up on whatever crap you got hanging from your shrouds, then it's time to re-think all that crap you have hanging from your shrouds.

If it's ratlines on your shrouds that are causing the jib not to tack, then maybe the convenience of spotting coral heads aloft from your ratlines when motoring into secluded and uncharted anchorages ain't so convenient as being able to make that headsail flop to the other side when doing some actual sailing…

Like I also said: It's probably a bad knot that keeps hanging up...
 

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Please explain this comment? How would you suggest the crew get aloft to furl or set the topsails, square sails and do maintenance on any tall ship?
Even on a smaller boat, ratlines have value for visibility if one is navigating reefs in uncharted waters. On my gaff ketch, one of the mizzen ratlines was where we stowed the outboard. They certainly beat the hell out of going aloft in a bosun's chair or with climbing rig, on any boat. Not as much a matter of "looking salty" as utility, in my book.
Fair enough but you have to admit baggywrinkles and ratlines are going to look pretty goofy on an Oday 27, which is , after all, the boat the op owns. If the op would provide information and pics I am sure we can help.

I am guessing that someone has installed rungs or steps on the mast. If that is the case they obviously weren't well thought out. I can't imagine why a boat that size would need such a thing anyway....
 

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Fair enough but you have to admit baggywrinkles and ratlines are going to look pretty goofy on an Oday 27, which is , after all, the boat the op owns. If the op would provide information and pics I am sure we can help.

I am guessing that someone has installed rungs or steps on the mast. If that is the case they obviously weren't well thought out. I can't imagine why a boat that size would need such a thing anyway....
Sailing in BC, I don't think you realize how thin an awful lot of the water is in South Florida or how often a very narrow deep channel snakes through knee deep water. Having the ability to get an observer 10 or 15 feet above deck to eyeball a channel has a lot to recommend it. In one area we have to traverse with (in our case) a 6.5' draft, within no more than 100 feet off our beam we often see people sitting in beach chairs in ankle deep water, fishing, while yet being 500 yards from "shore". Even the O'Day 27, with 4 feet of draft, would be constrained in that channel (and it is a fine boat for "gunk holing" in Florida). Many good deep anchorages can only be reached through narrow, winding, channels, through heart-stopping shallows in many cases within 100 feet of the shore or less (e.g. Pelican Bay south of Boca Grande). In California, the water in our slip was 35' deep. To get that in southwest Florida in places, we often have to be several miles off-shore (a common rule of thumb is 1' of depth per mile off shore).

FWIW...
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I've included a picture of where it is catching. It hooks on a rung on the shrouds. I think a roller furler may do the trick?
 

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Corsair 24
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just use the loose sheet method of tacking over

you can also use the backwind method, let it get some wind and release quickly...

or use any sort of smooth material over the shrouds that snag

just remember it will add considderable windage...
 
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