SailNet Community banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
712 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

I'm fix'n to purchase a new one piece sheet for my 150 when I get it back from the sail loft. The sheet's that came with the boat are all 5/8" diameter (or real close to that). I never measured them before, but from what I can recall, the jib sheets were always larger diameter than anything else on the boat.

What diameter is yours?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,233 Posts
I just bought new jib sheets for my friends almond 31.
Got something like 95' and did a simple hitch in the middle.

We got 7/16" just because the 3/8 felt a little small for the hand.
He has non-self tailing winches so it doesn't matter.


5/8" is massive.
 
  • Like
Reactions: christian.hess

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,262 Posts
Assuming you have normal size winches on your boat they should have a SWL of around 1500lbs. You can use any size sheet you want, but there isn't much point in using massive line that will destroy all the deck hardware on the boat long before it is even noticeably stressed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I've got 7/16" on 150 jib and 3/8 main sheet on my 23. 7/16" is comfortable and you only do 2 or 3 wraps on the winch anyhow. fits the cleats well enough. Be sure to use StaySet and not X. Just my humble opinion.
 

·
no longer reading SailNet
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
My boat has a 20% smaller genoa than yours (300sqft vs 365sqft). I've used 3/8" and 7/16" jib sheets and prefer the latter. My jib sheets are 7/16" that taper down to 1/4" dyneema and attach to the clew using soft shackles. That makes sail changes a lot easier because I can use the same sheets for any of my headsails and don't need to re-run sheets when changing headsails. It is also a lot easier to flake sails when you don't have to worry about attached sheets.

Fisheries Supply has Samson line on sale for a good price for a few more days, right now is the time to buy if you are local (especially if you have a club account). 7/16" XLS is $0.89/foot with a club account, LS is $0.67/foot. The cheapest prices online are at least 20% higher, often 35% higher.
 

·
Registered
Corsair 24
Joined
·
4,594 Posts
7/16 on my islander 36...I dont like biggest is better for sheets...but Im used to dinghy sailing

on new line you can go a line smaller than whatever was on the boat stock...but most people dont like to cause they like the biggest feel in their hands

however the benefits are great when going "down" a size

new line is also stronger if staying the same size so that why going "down" a bit or staying small will not cause any issues

for one in light air you have much less weight weighing the sail down

friction is less so sheeting in and out is smoother if using the same hardware as before

and lastly cost, you save quite a bit by not going oversize

and x2 on sta set the normal kind not the x...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
598 Posts
5/8th's is way to big/heavy in light air you will not even get it across the deck. I'd just bought some too and found 7/16th's as a good compromise between feeling good in the hands and light enough to pass across the deck in light air.

I bought Sampson trophy braid, just a tad fuzzy and feeling great in the hands..
 

·
Swab
Joined
·
825 Posts
7/16" on sheets and main, 3/8" on halyards

Down sized from 5/8" and 1/2" cause it fits the winchs, cleats and guides better
That is the problem on a lot of newer small boats. The cleats and other fittings are too small for lines that are comfortable in the hands. I installed larger cleats, blocks and masthead sheaves to accommodate 7/16" rope. 3/8" or 1/4" polyester braid would be strong enough but too hard on my old hands. Larger boats use larger lines but the cleats, IMO, are usually too small for a proper belay. (Trained on a square rigger - no "Yachtie hitches" allowed)

Rope of modern materials is almost always strong enough no matter the size. It is a matter of the right size for your hands and fittings large enough to accommodate it.

+1 on the StaSet-X. Too stiff for sheets. No stretch though. I still have some on my jib tack downhaul.
 

·
Registered
Corsair 24
Joined
·
4,594 Posts
yeah its the opposite on new boats cause that already factored in with the new line and stuff

also cost wise...
 

·
Registered
Corsair 24
Joined
·
4,594 Posts
I bought a 3/8th halyard and it looks real small...compared to my old wire rope ones which look at least like half inch at the rope ends...

but it will work fine with the sheaves up top and that way no sheave or hardware changes...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,304 Posts
The Cal 29 has a 3/8 mainsheet at 4:1 and you have to be pretty dam carful about NOT letting it run to fast as you will rope burn yourself on windy days

On a 35' I sail on the mainsheet is a harken unit with 4:1 / 8:1 which lowers the load while still allowing 3/8 BUT that's one long line :)

My Winches are modern ST30 and I still prefer a sheet on the big side for comfort
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top