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Discussion Starter #1
test - is it applicable to all sailboats or only small trailerable craft?
 

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Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
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Several questions only apply to trailerables. Also I would question some of the questions and assumptions about what contributes to suitable boats. Overall not a big fan of the quiz.
 

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I like the quiz, but not for the score / grade. I think it teaches some of the basics about design / construction choices in a way which is more accessible to some folks. Some of us can read equations and long explanations of design theory -- others need pics. I think John V is a treasure for some who might otherwise not find their way into the sailing world.
-M
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
I need some go-to resources, what would you guys recommend?

he has a well regarded book,

Seaworthy Offshore Sailboat: A Guide to Essential Features, Handling, and Gear
 

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Not a bad quiz to get you thinking but no questions about current condition/age of the boat or the sailor:confused: These 2 factors alone could have quite an impact on the seaworthiness of any boat.:)
 

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I stopped at question #2, which concludes that a wooden hull is necessarily more "seaworthy" than any other material. How idiotic! Yes, there are a lot of seaworthy wood-hull boats out there. But there are also a lot of wooden boats that are NOT seaworthy, and plenty of extremely seaworthy fiberglass, steel, and aluminum boats. To automatically give more points to wood is just dumb!
 

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Doesn't sail enough
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I stopped at question #2, which concludes that a wooden hull is necessarily more "seaworthy" than any other material. How idiotic! Yes, there are a lot of seaworthy wood-hull boats out there. But there are also a lot of wooden boats that are NOT seaworthy, and plenty of extremely seaworthy fiberglass, steel, and aluminum boats. To automatically give more points to wood is just dumb!
I saw that too, and I thought it was interesting, but unlike most people here I owned a wood boat for a few years. As a disclaimer, obviously he is not talking about resurrecting or even just buying used boats - when he says wood is good, he means in a well-found boat in perfect (dry!) condition.

I think the explanation is simple: wood can take abuse and retain a lot of its strength. There's typically a lot more thickness of wood than any other skin material in a hull, and it doesn't shatter or rip. Note that he only gave wood one more point than GRP or alum, and he doesn't consider steel because he's specifically talking about small boats. I bet if he were rating bigger boats, steel would top the list.
 

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El Chupa Nibre
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I stopped at question #2, which concludes that a wooden hull is necessarily more "seaworthy" than any other material. How idiotic! Yes, there are a lot of seaworthy wood-hull boats out there. But there are also a lot of wooden boats that are NOT seaworthy, and plenty of extremely seaworthy fiberglass, steel, and aluminum boats. To automatically give more points to wood is just dumb!
You'll love question #10 ;)
 
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