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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi. My husband and I just bought a 1975 22ft seafarer sailboat, but neither of us knows how to sail... My husband has a co-worker that offered to give him lessons, but aside from that, can someone offer advice/tips for a newbie sailor?
 

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Where are you? Maybe you can find a sailnet member that will help you out.
 

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Captain Obvious
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Get a sailing instructor and a marriage counselor. Not necessarily in that order.

Seriously you are in a fantastic area. Pick up Sailing for Dummies and get to know sailflow.com

Clean the fuel tank out and take the carburetor apart and clean it about 10 times until you/he can do it blindfolded while hanging off a ledge screaming your head off.

A dock would be a lot easier.

Don't be scared.
 

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Hi. My husband and I just bought a 1975 22ft seafarer sailboat, but neither of us knows how to sail... My husband has a co-worker that offered to give him lessons, but aside from that, can someone offer advice/tips for a newbie sailor?
Often a knowledgeable friend is the best way to pick up the needed skills. The only concern is that the friend really should know how to sail, or you could all end up in trouble.

Does the coworker have his own boat? What kind and how big? It might be best to do your first lesson on his boat (for liability and familiarity/safety). If his boat is a smaller boat, that might be an EVEN BETTER lesson for you, because smaller boats give quicker "feedback" when you make mistakes. Then if that goes well, invite him on your boat for a test run.

Much of the skills can be picked up through books. A book alone is not adequate, but it's a great start before you set foot on the boat. When I first started, I just checked out whatever the library had, and it helped me a lot.
 

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Congratulations and commiserations...

The Sailing For Dummies idea is a good one.

My wife and I started off in the same boat - literally and figuratively: neither of us had sailed before we bought our 26' boat. I spent the winter reading Sailing For Dummies and in the spring we cast off and never looked back. It took a while to figure out what all the bits of string and windy thingies were for, but it didn't take long for us to figure things out and start 'sailing'.
We have subsequently taken courses through the Sail & Power Squadron (Basic Boating - all book-learning. I took the piloting course as well) and a week-long liveaboard coarse through CYA (Intermediate Cruising Standard).

I think the things that I wish I had known more about before going off on my own were basic navigation and rules of the road. Once we knew how to read a chart and who has right-of-way we realized how close to disaster we had sailed in our first season. What's that thing about God looking after drunks and fools?

I think that sailing with a knowledgeable sailor would be very useful. The few times that I have done that my knowledge has gone up exponentially.

Seeing as you asked for advice here are a couple of pieces (take em or leave em):
  • let both of you take turns helming/crewing - both of you should be comfortable in either capacity.
  • learn how to reef
  • meet, talk to and sail with other sailors
  • be aware of the rules of the road but give way early if you suspect that the give way boat may not be aware of you or cannot change course
  • your boat can probably handle more extreme conditions than you can
  • have fun
 

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Type "sailing lessons near new bedford" into Google and you'll come up with several nearby schools.

Introductory courses certified by either the ASA or US Sailing are a good place to start. They're usually spread over a weekend and will give you all the basics you need to get out there. The advantage of a sailing school is an instructor knows not only how to sail, but how to teach sailing.

Don't be surprised if they put the two of you in different boats with different instructors. The idea of separating spouses is both will learn more and build confidence.

The weekend course worked out great for my wife and I, and it gave her confidence I don't think she'd have had learning from a friend. Now we're on the boat together pretty much every weekend during sailing season.

Best of luck, you'll do just fine and you'll have a ball with your 22 footer. That's where we started.
 
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Well since you have some time before you launch her get some books and read them.

The Complete Sailor, Second Edition: David Seidman: 9780071749572: Amazon.com: [email protected]@[email protected]@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/[email protected]@[email protected]@51WqtrgpTNL

This one is good, I have the first edition and it covers a lot. It is not so much that you will learn to sail from the book but it will help you understand what people are saying to do. Then you might want to sign up for some classes. The Coast Guard Auxiliary gives some good inexpensive courses:
USCGAUX: Public Boating Courses

Along with the Power Squadron.

Then you can take an ASA course.
 

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Welcome dave and krista, I'm in your neck of the woods. PM me, glad to help you two out if I can. With spring just around the corner, I'm getting itchy to start working on my boat doing the spring thing. What kind of condition is your in? Any pictures?
 

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Broad Reachin'
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Read, watch, and do. And ask lots of questions.

I think you'll be impressed by the number of eager helpers you'll get if you show up at the marina or mooring and introduce yourself as a new sailor looking to learn the ropes this season.

I understand this is your first sailboat, but is it your first boat overall? Knowing some boating basics makes it a lot easier to focus on the unique aspects of sailing.
 

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Captain Obvious
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First thing is jump into one of those "Is sailing sexist?" threads and get in all the man bashing you can. Do a search for "oink pig" or "man hate".

It doesn't matter if your husband doesn't know anything right now -one day he will. And then he will start...saying stuff.... and calling you "the admiral" while rolling his eyes.

You want to be prepared for that. The sailing part is easy. Anyone can do it.
 

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First thing is jump into one of those "Is sailing sexist?" threads and get in all the man bashing you can. Do a search for "stupid-penis" or "man hate".

It doesn't matter if your husband doesn't know anything right now -one day he will. And then he will start...saying stuff.... and calling you "the admiral" while rolling his eyes.

You want to be prepared for that.
LOL, I think we just got a window into Sal's life ! :laugher

With a boat, like a house, you tend to start figuring out "his" and "hers" jobs. For example I can't imagine my wife saying "You know I'd really rather change the oil in the diesel this weekend than curl up with a book." :D

But that's another topic entirely...

Just remember it's a boat. Have fun and don't take it all too seriously. There is absolutely nothing better than stretching out in the cockpit with your spouse after a nice day sailing with dinner, a glass of wine and watch the sun set.

Here are two more good books to add to your reading list:
Fast Track to Cruising: How to Go from Novice to Cruise-Ready in Seven Days [Paperback] [2004] (Author) Steve Colgate, Doris Colgate: Amazon.com: [email protected]@[email protected]@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/[email protected]@[email protected]@51x61GmfvNL

Amazon.com: Fast Track to Sailing: Learn to Sail in Three Days eBook: Steve Colgate, Doris Colgate: Kindle [email protected]@[email protected]@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/[email protected]@[email protected]@51K7gXLNxhL
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Does the coworker have his own boat? What kind and how big? It might be best to do your first lesson on his boat (for liability and familiarity/safety). If his boat is a smaller boat, that might be an EVEN BETTER lesson for you, because smaller boats give quicker "feedback" when you make mistakes. Then if that goes well, invite him on your boat for a test run.
His co-worker used to own a sail boat and said his wife is the expert sailor and was captain of a sailing team or something but they don't have a boat any more. So we'll be needing to learn on our own boat but they will both be available for as long as we need them. I just want to take some time before the boat is launched in the spring to learn what i can so i'm not totally clueless when they are teaching us. :)

I didn't even think to see what the library has, so I will definitely check them out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Congratulations and commiserations...

The Sailing For Dummies idea is a good one.

Seeing as you asked for advice here are a couple of pieces (take em or leave em):
  • let both of you take turns helming/crewing - both of you should be comfortable in either capacity.
  • learn how to reef
  • meet, talk to and sail with other sailors
  • be aware of the rules of the road but give way early if you suspect that the give way boat may not be aware of you or cannot change course
  • your boat can probably handle more extreme conditions than you can
  • have fun
I have come across some new "words" that I have had to look up and I have yet to see the work reef so I will definitely look that up and learn how to do it :) When we lived in FL we owned a motor boat so are familiar with the generalities, just not how it relates to sailing. Will definitely read the dummies book.
 

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Youtube is your friend.

If you have no experience on the water then take a quick boating safety course to make sure that you don't get in someone's way. That area can get busy in the summer but a month in and you will wonder why you waited so long.

Enjoy!!!;);)
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Welcome dave and krista, I'm in your neck of the woods. PM me, glad to help you two out if I can. With spring just around the corner, I'm getting itchy to start working on my boat doing the spring thing. What kind of condition is your in? Any pictures?
I thought I had posted some pics in my signature but I am not seeing it come up, let me see if I can get it to post here in the reply...

grrr it won't let me post pics until i have 10 posts so once I get them I will post the pics...
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Take some ASA sailing classes, do you really think an afternoon with your husbands buddy will prepare you for things that could happen at sea....
They are available for as long as we need them. We are new to sailing but not new to boating...
 
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