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I have taken short cruises all of my life, hampered by jobs, mortgages, bills, children, etc. When I finally took off and cruised for eight months a few years ago, I realized I should have started doing it when I was a lot younger.

If I had to do it over again, I would save like hell from the time I was 18, and go when I was 20 or 21, in whatever boat I could get for myself.

Plenty of time to come back, and start the grind later. My next cruise isn't scheduled for when I want to go, it's scheduled for when I can afford it, about six years from now.

I think the Pardey's summed it up perfectly. "Go small, go simple, go now."
 
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Captain Obvious
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I don't know. I was ..uhh.. less wise when I was 20. I tended to go out in all sorts of rough weather and do other sorts of risky behaviors. Perhaps its just as well that I didn't go too far.

At 48 I am still physically able to do pretty much anything, thankfully, and in 7 more years Uncle Sam owes me a pension that will should hopefully make the dream a reality, with little or no need to work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I don't know. I was ..uhh.. less wise when I was 20. I tended to go out in all sorts of rough weather and do other sorts of risky behaviors. Perhaps its just as well that I didn't go too far.

At 48 I am still physically able to do pretty much anything, thankfully, and in 7 more years Uncle Sam owes me a pension that will should hopefully make the dream a reality, with little or no need to work.
A good friend of mine used to say the same thing. He reached his 50's relatively well preserved with lots of plans. Five days before his retirement, he suffered a massive stroke. He lived, like a vegetable, for another two weeks or so. Tomorrow isn't guaranteed. A year off likely won't kill you at 48. Seven years might.
 

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I went cruising for 7 years when I was in my 40s. Sold my house to finance it.

Best thing I ever did.

Now I am retired and out cruising again. I am not sure I would have had the bottle to go at age 60 without the experience I gained in my 40s.
 

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You guys are really 'speaking to me'.

I'm 49 years old and expect to be layed off in the next few months. I am going to use my severance to buy a boat. I have kids and family here locally so won't be leaving on a long voyage but do plan to spend a few months in the Caribbean.

After about a year I plan on getting another job and while I'm working outfit my boat for a longer voyage so that when the kids are grown and I retire in a few years I can go on some long distance cruises.
 

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Captain Obvious
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A good friend of mine used to say the same thing. He reached his 50's relatively well preserved with lots of plans. Five days before his retirement, he suffered a massive stroke. He lived, like a vegetable, for another two weeks or so. Tomorrow isn't guaranteed. A year off likely won't kill you at 48. Seven years might.
That does suck about your friend. Sorry to hear that. You are preaching to the choir, but then again we all have to do what we have to do, especially if taking care of a family. I could never get back in the system at my current level if I left for a year.

I might live on a boat for a month or two at a time. My dream would be a beach house in the carrib, Florida or maybe Grenada with a sailboat out front. Sail a few weeks at a time, then relax at home. Maybe get a few motorcycles. That's more my speed than 100% on the boat.
 
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A good friend of mine used to say the same thing. He reached his 50's relatively well preserved with lots of plans. Five days before his retirement, he suffered a massive stroke. He lived, like a vegetable, for another two weeks or so. Tomorrow isn't guaranteed. A year off likely won't kill you at 48. Seven years might.
There is only a slight chance of being killed by the sea. There is a one hundred percent chance of dying of old age, or disease. Why be more scared of the sea, than of life?
 

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I saw this post and it intruigued me. First off, go when you feel like going. If you aren't ready, then wait. And when you do go my recomendation is to go slow, take your time and enjoy the journey. You will most likely only be in an area of the world once, so milk it for all it's worth.

Our experiece was; we had little money, bought a boat and just took it sailing (3 weeks in the yard). We had very little experience and we just took it one day at a time. When I hear of people spending years at the marina it makes me feel better about our boat having things done to it now, after two years of cruising, while we work back home; instead of working on the boat for 3 years and then cruising. But that is what is best for us.

When it comes to age, I laugh, we left in our mid twenties after squeezing dimes out of pennies back home and having a tough time with jobs ( recent graduates in a bad economy). We had done very well for ourselves considering the circumstances. When we left, people said we were young and weren't supposed to get good careers, so we rented our place out and went sailing. We were then 10 years younger than the "young" crowd out cruising. And everyone treated each other with mutual respect, something missing back home. When we finally went back home, we were treated as if we were even younger than before. It is a strange feeling when you are nearing on thirty, you have a home, degrees, amazing and difficult life experiences under your belt and society treats you like you are just out of highschool. Maybe wat I am saying is age doesn't account for **** these days.

I digress, I would recomend for those thinking of cruising to go when you feel ready. If you pack up everything and leave today you will probably be fine, and if you wait a few years you may or may not be better off. The hardest part is finding the right balance for you and who you are.
 

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Its easy to say go when your young and it does work for those who are lucky enough to live in a economy that allows them to find work and to save. In our case we spent 10 years looking for work and trying to scrape together the funds just to buy our first boat. It took us another 7 years to raise the funds to go cruising. We were 40 by that time.

I envy those who could do it in their twenties but we never gave up the dream.
Robyn
 

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Youth is so wasted on the young. :D
 
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my plan keeps on changing but I have the boat. and now I'm looking closer at the finances. if I can come up with a plan that will realistically get me a little better income while traveling I will spend a couple years around the Puget sound gunk holing and expanding (knowledge, buisness contacts, skills) if in the next few months I can not come up with a plan then Im going to head out somewhat sooner and see how it goes. Heck I live in the Puget Sound.. maybe Ill just cruise here full time for the next 20 years and manage to see 15% of the Sound.
 

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I've owned a lot of boats during my 73 years on this planet. Most were power boats, some measuring up to 75 feet, but the best adventure was aboard my 33 Morgan Out Island when I took it down to Marathon Florida from the upper reaches of Chesapeake Bay. The trip, at age 72 was exciting, but the absolute best part about the trip was all the wonderful people I met along the way. Cruisers are ALL wonderful people, and my fondest wish is to meet them all again in 2015, when I fully intend to make that trip again. My wife says if I do she will divorce me, and if that's the case so be it. I've been married to this woman for 51 years at this point, so I don't think she'll actually carry through with the threat, but if she does, there are a lot of nice ladies that I've met over these many years that would love to enjoy the adventurous live aboard with me. ;)

Gary :cool:
 

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Travel, I hope your spouse isn't reading this forum. If she is, I think after 51 years you two are probably "happy to be stuck with" each other.
 

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Lot's of time. The best is that once you've tried elderly you'll never go back.Priorities change along the way so none of this will matter.
 

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Lot's of time. The best is that once you've tried elderly you'll never go back.Priorities change along the way so none of this will matter.

I keep telling myself that (and told myself that when I came back from my last cruised). In six more years, I'll be financially ready to never work again (will only have one kid left in college and that's close enough to done) and I already have the boat. My wife and I will both be 62 then, so our plan is to keep running and working out to be really young 62ers. :D
 

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My plan was to head S. this coming Fall. Now, I believe that I might need another year to prep. No worries, as I have my clock set to "Island Time" ;)

Combine this thread with the 'old boat' thread/s, $500/annum cruising thread and a few other similar posts and that's me! :D

The first casualty of battle is the plan. So don't fixate on a plan. Just do it.....once prepared for most contingencies ;)
 
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