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Discussion Starter #21
Good sailing boats - used to race against one in Jacksonville - it always did well, the older Pearson 30's were heavier and more sluggish - very different boats - I think you are in North Carolina - but here in Florida - if you paid more than 2K for it - you overpaid , if you got it for a song or free - then maybe worth it - just never expect to recoup the money you out into it.
Paid $2500 for it and the inflatable dingy. I enjoy fixing things, as far as getting back what I put into it...well as long as it gives me and the family times we can remember I'll be happy.

Got the service and overhaul manual coming in from Moyer Marine on Thursday. Ken is full of good helpful information.

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Discussion Starter #22
Here is what I was talking about with the broken section of rub rail written by BoatUS "The hull-to-deck joint on the P30 is an external flange with the two components glassed together and then mechanically fastened with stainless steel, sheet metal screws. This is a method of construction that is particularly prone to damage from impact with piers and pilings and should be carefully inspected."

Pearson didn't use seacocks, from what I read they used gate valves and some fiberglass tubes built into the hull. So I will try to inspect all I can this weekend.

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Discussion Starter #23
Looks like the motor was in water from the flywheel cover. Am I correct?

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While rebuilding a boat can be a rewarding and satisfying way to spend a couple of years of your life, this boat sounds like a candidate for parting out. i.e. scrap value only, and that income would be offset against disposal costs of all the sawed-up hull and deck.
Sorry to be severely unenthused, but I have spent a LOT of time over the last 30 years working on sailboats. Even the really good ones can eat up continuing quantities time and money. And, some more time.... and some more money...

It's a buyers market, with many fine sailing classics, in actual sail-away condition, for a few thousand more than you say you paid.
 

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Maybe an outboard motor bracket and engine would be less expensive than a rebuilt atomic 4? Or pull the engine, have the crank shaft journals polished, new bearings for the main and pistons, gaskets, rings, valve job, would be how much? And what about the transmission? I once had an Isuzu engine overheat then seize in my Chevy LUV truck. Had the valves redone and drove the truck for a few more years. Maybe some very fine wet dry paper on the journals and bearing surface will get her running. I wouldn't toss the engine just yet. Tear her down, inspect, polish, reassemble, run her up checking the oil pressure. She just might have dodged the bullet. Got nothing to lose at this point except time. Cranks can be ground true and over size bearings can be had. Here is a link to a supplier of Atomic parts: Moyer Marine Atomic 4 Engine Rebuilding and Parts
 

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Sounds like you have a major project on your hands. The engine has the potential to be the biggest problem. Rebuilding it or putting a rebuilt one in from Moyer will cost much more than you paid for the entire boat. Most of the other projects will require less $, but will take up many hours of sweat equity. When complete, you will have a decent boat, but worth far less than what you put in.

If the engine is indeed toast, you should consider cutting your losses and moving on to something that is in better shape.
 

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Go here - https://www.moyermarine.com/forums/showthread.php?t=7107&highlight=RUST+frozen using this Moyer forum topic as a gateway to find Don Moyer's article on how to free up a 'frozen' Atomic-4. Many years ago Don Moyer referred this as an "Engine SPA". If you can't locate this 'article', contact Moyer Marine directly.

Being rust frozen isn't a death sentence for most rust-locked engines. Many times all thats needed is a long term soak in 1. Marvel Mystery Oil, 2. Penetrating Oil, or 3. lightweight transmission oil + acetone (50:50 mix), etc.

Your picture of the 'orange' engine, the orange paint kind of indicates that the engine probably was removed for rebuild. Hopefully this was done after the engine and boat were flooded/sank.

I repeat: dont FORCE the engine to turn over. Remove the spark plugs, spritz in some penetrating oil, put a breaker bar with socket on the 'nose bolt' of the crankshaft and gently rock the crankshaft back and forth to verify that the piston rings aren't frozen to the piston ring grooves, etc. It may take several days of 'soaking' the engine to 'free up' the rings, etc. and increasing but gentle 'persuasion' by the breaker bar and socket.

good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Go here - https://www.moyermarine.com/forums/showthread.php?t=7107&highlight=RUST+frozen using this Moyer forum topic as a gateway to find Don Moyer's article on how to free up a 'frozen' Atomic-4. Many years ago Don Moyer referred this as an "Engine SPA". If you can't locate this 'article', contact Moyer Marine directly.

Being rust frozen isn't a death sentence for most rust-locked engines. Many times all thats needed is a long term soak in 1. Marvel Mystery Oil, 2. Penetrating Oil, or 3. lightweight transmission oil + acetone (50:50 mix), etc.

Your picture of the 'orange' engine, the orange paint kind of indicates that the engine probably was removed for rebuild. Hopefully this was done after the engine and boat were flooded/sank.

I repeat: dont FORCE the engine to turn over. Remove the spark plugs, spritz in some penetrating oil, put a breaker bar with socket on the 'nose bolt' of the crankshaft and gently rock the crankshaft back and forth to verify that the piston rings aren't frozen to the piston ring grooves, etc. It may take several days of 'soaking' the engine to 'free up' the rings, etc. and increasing but gentle 'persuasion' by the breaker bar and socket.

good luck.
It appears the orange paint was sprayed on it while it was still in the boat due to the other stuff around it being orange. The engine base and side appears to be rusting and deteriorating. The screw clamps holding the hoses to the fittings for the water connections some we're so rusted they had broke a long time ago. I was going to pull it out but was afraid of dropping it. I may contact the marina and see what they charge to pull it since I unhooked and unbolted it all.

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Discussion Starter #30
Well just an update...the engine was a waste. Rust on camshaft lobes and more. Got a replacement engine in great shape installed in the boat now.

This is the speed sensor right? So what is in it now? Is that a plug? Looks like someone painted bottom paint over the bottom so it's hard to tell what it looks like from the bottom side.


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Gin Swilling Yacht Monkey
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Well just an update...the engine was a waste. Rust on camshaft lobes and more. Got a replacement engine in great shape installed in the boat now.

This is the speed sensor right? So what is in it now? Is that a plug? Looks like someone painted bottom paint over the bottom so it's hard to tell what it looks like from the bottom side.
[...]
You are correct: That is the knotmeter (speed sensor). In its place in the hull is a plug. You should be able to trace the cable coming from the knotmeter to an instrument that interprets the turning of the paddle wheel into boat speed.

Once the paddle wheel on the knotmeter is cleaned and turning freely, replace the plug with the knotmeter, allowing as little water to gush into the boat as possible. Check the knotmeter for an arrow or something indicating which way it faces.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
You are correct: That is the knotmeter (speed sensor). In its place in the hull is a plug. You should be able to trace the cable coming from the knotmeter to an instrument that interprets the turning of the paddle wheel into boat speed.

Once the paddle wheel on the knotmeter is cleaned and turning freely, replace the plug with the knotmeter, allowing as little water to gush into the boat as possible. Check the knotmeter for an arrow or something indicating which way it faces.
The strange question is why is there a plug in it versus the speed sensor? The boat is on the hard right now so it should be fairly easy to do.

I'm pretty certain the sensor will only fit in it one way and it appears the rubber seal is missing. Do they sell a generic seal for this? I attempted to wiggle the plug out but I figure it's painted to the hull.

Thanks, just trying to get things on the boat fixed before I get it in the water.

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Gin Swilling Yacht Monkey
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Sometimes they replace the knotmeter with the plug when they pull the boat out of the water so the lifting straps, or painting dont damage it.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Okay, that makes sense. Any idea of the seal or o-ring size that seals the locking ring on the knot meter?
 

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Well just an update...the engine was a waste. Rust on camshaft lobes and more. Got a replacement engine in great shape installed in the boat now./QUOTE]

I got the picture now! There are many types of sailors. For some it is a DIY project. Many people enjoy the doing up part as much as sailing the boat. I am a little bit that way myself:
https://davidchin35.blogspot.co.nz/
 

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al brazzi
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Okay, that makes sense. Any idea of the seal or o-ring size that seals the locking ring on the knot meter?
You will need that plug to remove and clean the paddlewheel from time to time. Some like mine have a flapper in the body that closes the water off when you pull the plug in the water, I don't think that one has the flapper so pulling in the water can be a little intimidating. Try to do it with someone on the Boat with you as a backup. There should be an Oring under the nut, pull it before you splash and make sure its there.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
You will need that plug to remove and clean the paddlewheel from time to time. Some like mine have a flapper in the body that closes the water off when you pull the plug in the water, I don't think that one has the flapper so pulling in the water can be a little intimidating. Try to do it with someone on the Boat with you as a backup. There should be an Oring under the nut, pull it before you splash and make sure its there.
Well yeah, that sounds a bit unnerving to think about pulling it out and sea water rushing in :eek. There was no o-ring unless it was sandwiched in between the plug and the body of the holder attached to the hull. But even in that case I'd want to replace a rubber o-ring, my o-ring for my fuel tank was cracked and leaking so I pumped the 8+ gallons of gas out of the tank and vacuumed the rest out (not the smartest thing, but couldn't figure out how else to do it.)
 

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Rock-

What is the knotmeter and depth finder manufacturers? Is it Datamarine, Signet or Standard Horizon?

In the case of Datamarine, their transducers and dummy plugs have two o-rings on the barrel to keep water out, and none on the locking ring that screws down onto the through-hull.
In the summer, "funk" is going to grow on the paddle wheel and eventually jam it up.
Yes, water is going to pour in while you swap the dummy plug in and out. With practice, you get faster. I like to keep a small nerf ball or wooden plug handy to jam in the hole in case something goes wrong, such as fumbling the transducer and losing it in the bilge.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
I can't honestly remember what brand they are. I remember most of them have a cover on them and a name stamped on the cover.

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I'm impressed that you scrounged and installed an engine in such short order. Great job.
Ensure that the shaft is properly aligned at the transmission or you'll wear out the shaft log, stuffing box and cutlass bearing in a short time.

Regarding through-hulls- Pearson did not use gate valves, at least not in the P-30's. I was hull #255 and I visited one of the #100's with original gear and they were ball valves or Groco rubber cone seacocks (for the toilet flushing water and discharge).

The galley and head sinks are metal "standpipes" that are heavily glassed into the hull. While this is not ABYC-compliant these days, I found mine to be very robust and eventually I quit worrying about them. On a port tack in heavy weather, sometimes a little seawater will back up into the head sink but it doesn't overflow onto the floor or anything. Just don't store anything large and heavy near the standpipes that might impact them and you'll be fine.

I see that the compression post issue has already been noticed and addressed. Eventually, you need to get something under that post of the cabin top will "dish" inward, around the mast base. G10 (Garolite) from McMaster-Carr is a great product to create the shim from. It has incredible compressive resistance and is rot-free. Make a shim, whack it in place, glass a tab around it, and get on with life.

You seem pretty handy. If possibly, get a hydraulic automobile frame-straightener or a bottle jack with a long, VERY strong rod and jack up the cabin top near the top of the compression post (use a large, wood block to protect the cabin top liner) to make it easier to get the shim in under the post. You'll need to slack the standing rigging before you start, or just remove the mast. You can tell you're getting things lined up with the door striker gets close to lining up with the hole.

Check this out for ideas: https://pearson30olvido.wordpress.com/restoration-and-updates/compression-post-replacement/
 
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