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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was really curious why keel stepped mast is generally considered better than deck stepped (providing compression post is in good shape)? In my search I found keel stepped boats tend to be more expensive but what does it really mean to a weekender sailer who would venture out 5-10 miles off the shore?

Also, about the mast, is double spreader much better than a single spreaders? yes, I get the theory of the mast being supported in more places but again what does this translates to when you are sailing?

As always, much appreciate the time anyone puts in to reply.

Thanks

val
 

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Single spreader vs double spreader

Hey,

I'm not an expert, but a double spreader rig is better than a single spreader because:
-For mast of the same height the double spreader rig will be lighter. (Since the mast is supported in two places it can be built thinner and lighter).
-The shrouds tend to be located more inboard. This allows for a tighter sheeting angle and higher pointing.

Barry
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Great, thank you! Do you happen to know about the double spreader advantage? Let me clarify why all these questions came up. I am currently considering buygin a 1985 Canadian Sailcraft 30 (Tony Castro design). Keel stepped, double spreader...AND... a baby stay.
 

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re: deck-stepped vs. keel-stepped - I think this often comes down to the specific boat you're considering. Each design has tradeoffs, but each can also serve its' intended purpose, particularly for "a weekender sailor who would venture out 5-10 miles off the shore".

I've had two deck-stepped masts and currently own a keel-stepped mast. The first deck-stepped mast boat I owned was a small 25-foot swing keel boat that was trailerable, largely due to the swing keel and the ability to fairly easily raise and lower the mast, which likely would not be the case if it were keel-stepped.

The second deck-stepped mast boat I owned was starting to show slight "wear and tear". The deck had sagged slightly under the mast over the years as the rigging was tightened to compensate. The compression post/bulkhead showed some fatigue too, with a hairline crack showing upon close inspection.

I was happy to have a keel-stepped boat when we purchased our current Catalina 34. Now instead of wear/fatigue on the deck or bulkheads, we get rainwater in the bilge both in season and in winter storage. It's not a huge issue, but something to be aware of and track carefully. Interestingly, the C34 was first offered as a deck-stepped boat (1986) and then switched to keel-stepped (1987 and later).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Re: Single spreader vs double spreader

Hey,

I'm not an expert, but a double spreader rig is better than a single spreader because:
-For mast of the same height the double spreader rig will be lighter. (Since the mast is supported in two places it can be built thinner and lighter).
-The shrouds tend to be located more inboard. This allows for a tighter sheeting angle and higher pointing.

Barry

Sorry did not see your response while I was typing up mine.
 

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Great, thank you! Do you happen to know about the double spreader advantage? Let me clarify why all these questions came up. I am currently considering buygin a 1985 Canadian Sailcraft 30 (Tony Castro design). Keel stepped, double spreader...AND... a baby stay.
I'm a little biased myself but the CS30's were a quality made boat. Leaning to the racier side of sailing CS went with the stronger keel step option along with the shrouds kept closer to the center line of the boat.
As long as your mast boot is in good shape you shouldn't get much water down below.
The mast step at the keel has a bit of a sump that contains any water that comes down the inside of the mast. The water in the sump eventually evaporates.
I also tend to think that a keel stepped mast if hit by lightning would provide a better path to the water than a deck stepped.
 

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I was really curious why keel stepped mast is generally considered better than deck stepped (providing compression post is in good shape)? In my search I found keel stepped boats tend to be more expensive but what does it really mean to a weekender sailer who would venture out 5-10 miles off the shore?

Also, about the mast, is double spreader much better than a single spreaders? yes, I get the theory of the mast being supported in more places but again what does this translates to when you are sailing?

As always, much appreciate the time anyone puts in to reply.

Thanks

val
I've owned both a deck and a keel mast stepped boat and like the deck stepped better just because it get less water into the boat. My first spring with my keel stepped boat the water was to the top of the bilge after the winter. I don't feel there really is any strength difference between to the two of importance other than paper.

Double spreaders over single spreaders have no cons to me.
 

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Looking at replacing a rotted compression post, I'm thinking keel stepped would be better. And you get a bilge pump that routinely gets flushed with freshwater? Awesome.
 

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I. Have a keel stepped
If I loose mast in nasty condition I will always have a tube where I can insert the spinnaker pole for a jury rig
 

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isnt it what the motor in a sailboat is for?
Perhaps.. but if you're a couple of thousand miles offshore you'd likely run out of fuel - and then what!??
 

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To the op:

You mention that the CS30 has a baby stay. I have a 1988 C&C 30 which shares some design characteristics. I have to say that the baby stay is a major pain in the ass. It takes up deck space that could make dinghy stowage more manageable. It also chafes head sails. Consider getting some of those wheels that some people put on lifelines to make tacking easier. Th CS30 has always seemed like a nice boat. Good luck.
 

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To the op:

You mention that the CS30 has a baby stay. I have a 1988 C&C 30 which shares some design characteristics. I have to say that the baby stay is a major pain in the ass. It takes up deck space that could make dinghy stowage more manageable. It also chafes head sails. Consider getting some of those wheels that some people put on lifelines to make tacking easier. Th CS30 has always seemed like a nice boat. Good luck.
A piece of 2 inch PVC or ABS pipe over the babystay to just above clew height (usually 3-4 ft) works better than a single-point roller. The sail and sheets slide cleanly past the pipe in a tack... Cheap, too!
 
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