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Good post. For sure boat aesthetics have evolved since this boat was designed. I suppose there are also some new hull technologies out there. However... I for one don't even like many of the newer boats.... and features... such as instrument pods and dual helms which seem to be very common... or GPS driven APs. The 36s is a very good design as far as interior features... a huge dry comfortable cockpit and a large flat deck work on if needed. It's also a very good sailor for 36' boat... I do 150-175 NM in 24hrs on passages. This is not intended as a stripped out racer. It was designed and marketed as a racer-cruiser... a weird designation in my opinion. It's not a slow heavy cruising boat and it's not a plastic race boat. The craftsmanship is steller... the build quality second to none. Catalina, Hunter etc. and so forth are not comparable boats. A person wanting a Halberg Rassy is not going to look at Hunters.
I am perfectly aware of who the buyer for this boat is. And it is not Joe Sailor going to a broker to "see what he's got on his listings". The person who wants a 36s and particularly THIS one with it's equipment list and owner improvements, know the brand, the boat and is looking for THAT not a 36 or 38' boat.
I think of it like getting a new used car... Do you look for a sedan or a BMW, Audi or Benz? Almost every buyer knows the brand and model they want. And as there are millions of cars buyers are more educated. Boats are very much different. And this boat is very rare in the States. I was the only Contest moored in Northport (1000 boats) Dering Harbor, Stirling Harbor, Sag Harbor and in almost every winter store location I was over 36 years.
I am not desperate to sell the boat and will keep it but find help in maintenance... I already gave up DIY on the bottom waxing and so forth. Changing oil and filters is something I can do with no problem. I always (almost) has help with getting sails on and off... I will continue.
I think sale by owner is the way to go. I can make a page and post it and see who bites... but not for now.
Onward!
I did the same thing last year. But I offered our sailboat for sail myself. There was lots of interested parties but most didn't know what they were looking at. One couple that I thought did understand ended up being real perfectionists but didn't want to pay or do the maintenance. Finally, I offered at my "price is firm" low price. A couple wanted to buy because of the low price only. Not sailors at all. I realized that I would never have such a special boat again and kept it. I'm glad I did. I just keep it up, maintain, improve, sail and enjoy. I find that the general public is very hard to enjoy. I also find that my boat is very easy to enjoy. Makes it easy to live with that decision. Oh by the way, salesmen are just salesmen, they are like most politicians. Try not to get mixed up with them......
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Sander, as an owner of Contest (43 CC, in Boston), I can tell you most brokers know nothing about Contest, HR, Najad and that breed. Very few boats are built at this quality that lasts forever. If maintained well - and it looks like yours is in a great shape, attention to details etc., this boat can survive like new for another 32 years… And the 36S has been one of the best models built by Contest - ever!

Good you enjoy maintaining and sailing her, even with the limitations, keep her like that and one day the right educated buyer will show up.

Take care and be well!
I think you nailed it. However in addition to that... I thought the broker was not thorough... not even inquisitive about the boat, its history and the many upgrades from the factory version. This may be typical of US brokers...I don't know. It gave me no confidence. He was there to sell a 36' boat... and 36' boat despite his boasting of his bona fides.
 

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We speak different languages (sailors brokers cheap buyers)
for fun and before going to Martha Lei to reposition my water maker did a google search
on monetary value for the things we love.

"In America, it is not important how much an item costs, it's more important how much you can save when you buy it. - coolfunnyquotes.com "

on sailing

3. Socialize
In our opinion, sailors are one of the best company you can have. It's an amazing feeling to enjoy a couple of beers or simply a cup of coffee with fellow sailors exchanging sailing stories and sharing experiences. Even in forums and Facebook groups, we find that sailors are the most helpful, funny and social people that are always up for a good joke or a short chat.

4. Solitude
On the other hand, sailing is also a great way to spend some time alone. Leave the noise, confusion, and stress of the daily world behind for a few days, weeks or even months and experience the freedom of solitude. These moments of pure solitude and blending with nature is one of the most important of all the 6 reasons why we love to sail.

5. Thousands of places to discover… and more
You know exactly what we're talking about right? There are countless numbers of stunning sailing destinations: the islands and coasts in Scandinavia, or the sunny Mediterranean sea, the Maldives, the Caribbean… The list is endless! You can never run out of places ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
I don't have a high regard for real estate brokers and no sailboat brokers. I don't think they do much for the fees they charge. Why don't they charge an hourly rate for their time like many workers do? Sales commissions are inherently irrational and don't reflect work involved in making a sale. I think these sales commissions are nothing short of unethical.

Before the www have someone who assembled boats for sale, had knowledge of those boats, had experience sailing... and could hook up a seller and a buyer. Appraised value in many cases is simply made up out of whole cloth... almost always based on false ideas... and ultimately is what the market has done or is doing,

You can find something in a thrift shop, for example for $10 which has an appraised value (market demand) for hundreds of dollars. This makes no sense. Sailboat market makes little sense as well. Someone who knows about the item for sale more likely will assign a realistic value to it. You need to be informed. Brokers SHOULD be but often aren't.. and frankly don't care. They don't want to work...drive over to look at the boat... take some pics ... look up on the web... make a listing and wait for offers and haul in thousands of dollars. Real estate is even worse.

Today if you have a boat for sale... list it yourself online.
 

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My view of the used sailboat market is that there really isn't one. It isn't a functioning market, not in the way most people think of them.

A market requires a fairly large volume of transactions to be taking place in relatively similar conditions. Used sailboats are more like one-off transactions with so many confounding variables that it means normal market signals don't operate, or operate poorly. I think used boat sellers should view the sales as just that: a one-off transaction.
 
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