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Discussion Starter #1
I just traded an old power boat for an old sailboat 1976 Kells 22. It has what appears to be a cement shoal draft keel.

I have owned some older sailboats in the past and hope to fix this one up. It seems pretty solid for a 76.

My question is, there are two pulleys on the outside of the cockpit. I will try and grab a picture or two of them and post their location. They are on the port side of the boat and run horizontally. They are set back about 6 in from each other. Any idea what these would have been used for?

I appreciate the help!

Ben
 

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Without a pic and position, it's hard to say. Sounds like these "blocks" might be the foresail leads, but I'd expect one on each side, unless it's a self tacker. Maybe leads for a furling line or staysail sheet?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I will hopefully get the boat back to my place in the next few days. I will take a picture then. Thanks.
 

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You can see
That's pretty hard to see. They look like blurry turning blocks. None on the other starboard side? If indeed turning block, I'll stick with my initial guesses. Sail sheets all the more likely, if the block is set to deliver the line, at the appropriate angle, back to the winch I can make out.
 

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I don't recall the setup, Dad had a Kells Coaster 23 (shoal keel). Yes its a heavy boat, also its terribly unbalanced we worked hard to work the lee helm out of that boat. The barn door rudder was my personal suspicion as part of the problem (and shoal keel, which I vowed to never own since because of this problem).

That being said, for a 23 footer, it was a large cockpit and decent room below. Also very solidly built (as you noted).

I recall blocks on the stern that were stand-up blocks, and those were a 3 point mainsheet, and traveler arrangement. I would have liked a raised actual traveler on the boat to allow changing angle of attack versus angle and downforce. Of course you couldnt' do that because it would interfere with the tiller. I also thought maybe a better arrangement would have been a barney post in the center of the cockpit and a single mainsheet system. Dad wasn't big on changing the original designs, so I was overruled on these things (also my father was a notorious klutz and if something was on the cockpit floor he'd find a way to trip on it). I also recall that I hated the genoa sheet arrangement and he and I worked to not use it as it was designed (and that may be what you are referencing, your picture doesn't provide me enough to trigger my memory).

2 things I think would have made that boat sail better (than what we had)... fixing that mainsheet arrangement (somehow, somewhere), and getting a decksweeping genoa (we had a high clewed 115% and it just wasn't enough). I'd wager that a Catalina 22 headsail would work.

One thing I recall VERY vividly about the boat, was the mast hinge arrangement. It was a 2 pin system (aft and forward). You placed the mast down and over the aft holes, lifted the mast, then attempted to push the forward pin in. What stunk was, to get the aft pin in, the mast had to be at about 15 degrees (with the spreaders behind the stern - so unbalanced), to clear the hatch slide to down below (we cracked the hatch a couple times becuase yours truly was standing with a mast on his shoulder while Dad attempted to get the pin in).

One REALLY cool thing about our Kells, is Dad had a Chrysler 2 stroke electric start 9.9 HP for it with remote controls. (way overkill) but that darned Chrysler started in half a turn every year the 15 years Dad owned the boat. Most low maintenance outboard I ever saw (Dad was notorious for not maintaining gear oil or impellers). Hated those remote cables (that went through the sleave along with the fuel line - didnt' really fit). Every year, 2 twin screws, and 2 massive bolts going through the outboard bracket - fun times.

Somewhere I have Dads logbooks on sailing the boat. Ask a question I might be able to dig it up an answer. We owned the boat starting around 1987. Dad and I had a bearing blow out on the trailer on the Blue route headed to Oxford, MD with the boat on a trailer from Coopersburg, PA, wheel hub melted and welded to axle... probably one of the funniest sadest tales of my father attempting to enjoy his hobby when everything was workign against him. Never laughed so damned hard in all my life. Ended the day with a celebration of his birthday, and a great beer, then promptly got eaten by mosquitos staying over night on the boat in Oxford.

PS: Boat name was Skylark. I don't recall hull number or year (but again I could probably look it up).
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the post! It's great to hear other peoples stories about their sailing experiences.

The rudder is definitely a piece of work. It does not have a tiller handle at the moment so I will need to construct one for the rudder. It seems to be a big chunk of aluminum or some sort of metal, I didn't really get a good look at it yet.

I have only owned and sailed two other boats before, both were Macgregors, the 22 and 26d. The 22 had a swing keel and the 26d was a water ballast with a daggerboard. I did not like the swing keel since I was always fearful that the bolt was going to break off or cable snap. It also made some humming noises and slapping noises when tacking. I am hoping the shoal keel does better but we will see. I am wondering if it will be more stable than the macgregors but I will just have to wait a few months until I can take it out.

The mast sounds interesting to raise. I will have to construct some sort of brace or crutch to keep that mast at 15 degrees or so because I will be raising it myself most of the time. The forward pin is put in after the forestay is connected I am guessing. I have never had a furling jib sail, this one has one so I will have to figure out how to attach that properly. I have no idea where the furling sheet goes but I am not worried about that at the moment. The stainless steel cables were all off the boat and in storage so that is my first mission is to see what is in good condition and what needs to be replaced.

The front sail does appear to be pretty small and I will be interested in picking up a genoa, that Catalina sail is a great suggestion and one I will remember in a year or two when I am ready to upgrade.

Thanks again for the details in your post!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Here are some better pictures. I limped the sailboat over to my house, a bearing was squeaking the whole way.

Any ideas what these two pulleys are for? They both need new sheaves.
137663
137664
 

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Discussion Starter #9
That's pretty hard to see. They look like blurry turning blocks. None on the other starboard side? If indeed turning block, I'll stick with my initial guesses. Sail sheets all the more likely, if the block is set to deliver the line, at the appropriate angle, back to the winch I can make out.
So I looked a little closer and the blocks are in a bag. Previous owner painted the top a d took the starboard blocks off. So with two blocks on both sides what do u think it would be for?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I dug out the stainless rigging and unrolled all of the stainless steel lines. There are a lot of them. Any ideas how many I should have for this boat? It looks like there are two shorter cables on both the starboard and port side. I have six full length cables. Where would those all go? It also has a cable in the roller furling sail. Perhaps I have some extras.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I was wondering, do you remember if you had to disconnect any of the stainless steel rigging when you launch the boat? Obviously the force stay in rear stay would be disconnected but what about the other three on each side?
 

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As I recall, we attempted to use those blocks for the genoa sheets as well, and honestly it just doesn't work.

Yes if I recall it had a doub set of lowers. The spreaders aren't swept, and I think we obviously removed the forestay, and losened (greatly) the lowers (aft) and detached the foreward lowers. Stood the mast up, then attached forestay, then either attached or tightened the aft lowers, and attached the foreward last, but I don't remember it being terribly hard to get it done. The hard part was getting the aft pin in on the tabernacle.

Lots of questions. We didn't have roller furling, but my guess is the furler contains the forestay, usually you attach it with sail on as the forestay. So by my comments above, you'd have what you are calling "full length" which I wager you mean goes to top of mast (masthead rig). So you'd have 4 full length (goes to top of mast) stainless (stays - 2 shrouds, forestay, backstay). Then 2 sets (total 4) of "lower shrouds," which attach at or below the spreaders (halfway up the mast).

Stolen from sailboatdata (the best info ever reference: https://sailboatdata.com/sailboat/kells-23-coaster-23 )

By the way the picture below doesn't actually reflect how the mainsheet system actually worked (it would have been better if it did), but instead attaches at the aft end of the boom, to the transom in 2 points (port/starboard).
137677
 

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So I looked a little closer and the blocks are in a bag. Previous owner painted the top a d took the starboard blocks off. So with two blocks on both sides what do u think it would be for?
Generally, I'd think one, on each side, was to take the jib sheet back to the winch, but the angles don't seem right. Why two on each side, who knows. Maybe a rudimentary form of adjusting the lead for different sized sails I tried to google pics of the Kells and did not see these clearly on those pics. They may have been a modification.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Generally, I'd think one, on each side, was to take the jib sheet back to the winch, but the angles don't seem right. Why two on each side, who knows. Maybe a rudimentary form of adjusting the lead for different sized sails I tried to google pics of the Kells and did not see these clearly on those pics. They may have been a modification.
Thank you, I will probably just remove them then and rig it back to what I see in other pictures when I google kells sailboats. I appreciate your help!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thank you for the rigging information. I thought there should only be 4 full-length stainless. I believe I have at least two extra cables then.

I am fairly new at sailing, sorry if I am messing up the proper names here. So if I understand you correctly I can use the furling jib as my forestay and the backstay should have a y at the end. I believe i see where they would connect on the boat. The forward stay bracket was removed from the boat when they painted it so I believe I will beef it up a little before I put it back on. Thanks again for all the help!
 

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The mast‘s standing rigging is a highly critical matter of safety. You might want a professional rigger to help you.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Ok had a chance to look at the running rigging and have a box of parts to go through. I was under the impression that the main sail sheet was at the end of the boom and ran to two pulleys at the rear of the boat. When I took out the boom to inspect the boom it has a double pulley in the middle of the boom and not at end. I will need to raise the mast and take some pictures. Again I am fairly new to sailing, I understand the basics but that's about it. Would this be for a traveler perhaps? I don't see any old screw holes in the middle of the boat but I do see some screw holes on the seats. I am leaning towards trying to hook up the boat to its original design since I would prefer to have the cockpit as clean as possible. I will not be doing any serious sailing, more cruising and some day sailing.

I also noticed that I have two pulleys at the top of the mast, I figured one was for my main halyard and one for the jib halyard. I then realized there is another pulley a few feet down from the top that points towards the front of the boat. Would that would be for a jib sail too? Perhaps one is for a spinnaker? I did not measure the roller furling to see which one would be a better fit.

Any ideas on either of these two question?
 

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Schnool's diagram in post #12 has a lot of information for you. It shows the mid-boom mainsheet setup. It also shows the forestay, backstay, upper shroud, lower forward shroud and lower after shroud. (Five of them.) Your pulley a few feet down from the masthead sounds like it could be for the spinnaker pole topping lift. Is there a spinnaker pole? The cheek blocks on the cockpit sides may be for the jib sheets and spinnaker sheets, but the way they lead lines to the winch seems a bit strange; it is hard to tell from the photos in your post #8. The first picture makes it look like a line has chafed the side of the coaming/rail forward of the forward block. That could likely be from a jib sheet, but only if the lead to the winch works properly. You will have to put a line through the block and lead it to the winch to determine if it does. The after cheek blocks would then be for spinnaker sheets. Their leads to the winches look like they should be OK. Putting the mast up will help you figure out what goes where. If the mast is deck-stepped you can probably attach the backstay and lower after shrouds on both sides before raising the mast. That will allow you to pull it up with a jib halyard and then attach the forestay without worrying about it falling over. Then you can attach the other shrouds. Sometimes you can leave the upper shrouds attached before raising a deck-stepped mast too, but it depends a bit on the geometry of the chainplates. If the mast is keel-stepped the geometry gets more interesting. You may be able to attach the backstay and shrouds on one side, or if the mast is light enough, simply lift it and slap it into place and then attach the standing rigging.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
It's seems to me that if I am just going to be doing light cruising it would be a bit of overkill to have those blocks on the side. Plus I don't have a spinnaker at the moment.

Thanks for all the help you gave some great suggestions. I still can't find anywhere to hook in the main sheet. I would imagine it would be in the middle of the cockpit floor. The only screw or bolt holes in the fiberglass is on the seats.
137703
 

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So there should be blocks or attachment points on the stern, port and starboard, so you can arrange something like this. Yeah I know this is above the hatch, yours would be attached all the way at the stern.
137704

My preference would be more like this, barney post and block with cleat. You'd have to add it, and that hardware isn't cheap.

137705

Even better would be an actual traveler, and mainsheet (even more expensive - and probably overkill on the Kells).
137706
 
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