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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2 burner Kenyon on my recently purchased boat. Previous owner stated it didn't work very well, flare ups and etc. I haven't even tried to use it yet but its next on my list. Looking for some tips so I can tackle, conquer and mark this one off the list.
By the way I'm nearing the end of my list. Sails professionally repaired, new canvas, engine maintenance done, painting and varnishing done, autohelm installed and about 75% new lines. I'm broke but happy, time to go sailing. :)
 

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Old soul
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I had a Kenyon pressure alcohol 3-burner stove/oven on the previous boat. Used it for years with few problems. I'm going from memory, but I recall that the burner nozzles can become clogged (which means they don't work at all, or partially clogged (which means you get erratic burning). I also found the air intake screen around the nozzle can get clogged. Cleaning out the screens made a difference.

If this is a pressure alcohol system (I don't know if Kenyon did non-pressure) then I assume you are aquatinted with the priming process. It's no big deal, although it seems to spook a lot of people. This is where you can get flare ups. Otherwise I never had a problem.
 

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If you like I can put you in touch w/ my father. He was an engineer w/ Kenyon and held some of their patents. He did a lot of investigations of stove fires.
Jim
 

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Tartan 27' owner
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My Kenyon 2 burner Homstrand pressurized alcohol stove is not so pressurized anymore. does not hold enough pressure and is thus more of a conversation piece than a useful stove.
I'd keep my eye out for a deal on a 2 burner Origo non-pressurized stove; no flare ups.

"He did a lot of investigations of stove fires." - Jim Rafford
That should tell you something.

That said, when they work, they work quite well. I'd be interested in Mr. BubbleheadMd's 2 burner Kenyon if it hasn't already found a new home.
Flare ups are part of life.
 

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I lived with those for many years on a couple of boats. Rebuilt burners a couple of times and even replaced one burner entirely. I got pretty good at fixing and using them, but it was always an issue. Finally replaced the Kenyon on my previous boat with an Origo and it was the best upgrade I ever did on that boat.

If you can get burner parts, it might be worth spending the time and effort to get it working better, but don't expect miracles. Strongly suggest you plan on getting an Origo in the near future.
 

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I have purchased parts from ESS-KAY YARDS in NY. They were helpful. I found it very difficult to replace the sintered metal filter in the burner head. In fact I destroyed one of them. That's a 100 bucks. So, maybe try to soak and clean it first. The stove will flare up if you don't operate it correctly. Exciting in a small space. The methanol fuel typically found for the Origo's didn't work for me. It clogs the burners. You need the ethanol based fuel. Or high proof spirits. Or if you're really stuck/desperate certain rubbing alcohols found in drug stores are ethanol based.
 

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I used a pressure stove for about a year and sort of enjoyed the whole zen of cooking on it. I would never turn my back on it. I would not even leave it long enough to take a leak.

The first time I made coffee on my new origo I was able to go back to bed and read until I heard it perking.

Definitely save up to upgrade to a non pressurized stove.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm really just looking for some tips on maintenance and cleaning to get it operational again. I know there are better stoves out there. Just want to be able to make a cup of coffee while at an anchorage. A new one is not is the budget at this time. Just spent 2000 on new canvas, 700 on sail repairs. and another g or 2 on other misalliance stuff. A new stove isn't happening this year. I think I'll just pull it apart, clean it with some brake or carb cleaner, fill it up and see what happens. Hopefully I wont need my fire extinguisher.
 

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islander bahama 24
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A cheap one burner propane stove is less than the cost of a gallon of alcohol and I cooked on a cylinder of propane for two weeks living aboard full time a cheap alternative in the interem
 

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S/V Wyndwitch - Morgan 24
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"Just want to be able to make a cup of coffee while at an anchorage. A new one is not is the budget at this time. Just spent 2000 .....A new stove isn't happening this year. I think I'll just pull it apart, clean it with some brake or carb cleaner, fill it up and see what happens. Hopefully I wont need my fire extinguisher.[/QUOTE]

Ive been in study and training on a Homestrand 205 bought various parts from Ess kay Yards and now have one burner working perfectly and the other needing to be completely stripped and reassembled . By the time most of us get these gizmos they are mostly in need of a serious cleaning. To do so the needle valves should be removed as carb cleaner may melt the graphite bushings. Anyway they do seem great when properly maintained but hindsight a used origo might been cheaper!. Always have a water spray bottle near to hand!

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I317 using Tapatalk
 

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Don't call me a "senior"!
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I was in a similar situation when I bought my current boat. I found a used Origo 2-burner stove on eBay for $200 or so. It made the biggest difference for the buck I've managed to accomplish in the seven years I've had the boat. I don't know anyone who has switched to a non-pressurized alcohol stove and regretted it. I suppose there are some folks in that category, but they must be pretty few and far between.
 
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Old enough to know better
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An inexpensive butane stove might be the best option until you can afford an Origo.
I have a copy of the Kenyon that I got on Amazon:

Amazon.com : GAS ONE Stainless Steel Portable Gas Stove UL and CSA List : Portable Butane Gas Stove : Sports & [email protected]@[email protected]@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/[email protected]@[email protected]@41rzk-wxyvL

The thing is great. I have not used it on a boat, but used it in my apartment when the stove quite and the landlord would not fix it. Worked quite well, very hot burner. Will have to figure out how to store the fuel cans but I think it would be safer than a pressurized alcohol stove. They are also great at home for doing fun deserts at the table and fondue. I think the price has about doubled since I bought it, but still would be worth it for a good cup of coffee in an anchorage. I don't think it would be a permanent fix but will get you warm food for the season till you can get a proper stove installed.
 

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The misinformation on pressure alcohol stoves is legion. Get the operating instructions online and FOLLOW THEM. What people refer to as flare ups are simply the predictable behavior of preheating. Visit spiritburner.com for lots of info from people who know stoves. That said, I converted a pressure alcohol stove to pressure kerosene... Easy burner part replacement. Kero does give a hotter flame for faster coffee.
 

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I consider pressurized alcohol stoves to be THE most dangerous things I have ever seen on a boat. Alcohol can burn with an invisible flame meaning that a person can go through the priming process and think the priming flame is out attempt to pour more fuel on to prime and easily set the entire alcohol container on fire. I'd sooner sail without life jackets than with a pressurized alcohol stove.
When I was considering what to do with the one on my boat, eventually I took the pressurized innards out and looked at the burner wells............hmmmmmmmmmmm. They fit a can of sterno nicely. Increase the height of the pan supports by using long studs screwed up from below and it works fairly well.
If you really want to cook more'n a pot of coffee or hot water, do it on a propane stove mounted on the stern rail like an Origo.
 

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Old soul
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I consider pressurized alcohol stoves to be THE most dangerous things I have ever seen on a boat. Alcohol can burn with an invisible flame meaning that a person can go through the priming process and think the priming flame is out attempt to pour more fuel on to prime and easily set the entire alcohol container on fire. I'd sooner sail without life jackets than with a pressurized alcohol stove.

When I was considering what to do with the one on my boat, eventually I took the pressurized innards out and looked at the burner wells............hmmmmmmmmmmm. They fit a can of sterno nicely. Increase the height of the pan supports by using long studs screwed up from below and it works fairly well.

If you really want to cook more'n a pot of coffee or hot water, do it on a propane stove mounted on the stern rail like an Origo.

A little hyperbolic, don't you think Frog? There a lots of things to be scared about on a typical boat. Used improperly a winch will take your fingers off. A boom can easily kill someone, and the idea of using a highly volatile fuel that is invisible and heavier than air is just plain crazy ;-).

Yes, pressure alcohol stoves can be dangerous if used improperly. Same goes for many boat systems. I used my Kenyon for six years. Zero problems. Keep the burners clean (just like propane or kero), use clean fuel, and operate it properly. They can work fine. They're not as efficient as propane or kero. The fuel is liquid, so is volumous, making it harder to carry months at a time. And the fuel is apparently getting harder to find. But to call it "the most dangerous thing on a boat" is just silly.


Why go fast, when you can go slow
 

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Frogwatch:
I was not aware that Origo even made a propane stove. Their non-pressurized alcohol stoves are well regarded though. And Sterno is just alcohol in a gelled form with the same drawbacks as liguid (though it may be treated to burn with a more visible flame than liquid alcohol).
 
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