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I am curious if anyone has used kerosene as a liquid fuel for cockpit grills. I have a kerosene galley stove and want to avoid propane storage (a fuel I don''t carry now)on the boat. With two small children, waiting for the charcoal to heat isn''t always desirable.

It seems straight forward to me, just add a spare kero burner in the bottom of the grill and have a layer of gas grill brickettes above the flame to spread the heat. I feel a backpacking stove''s fuel bottle and pump would be a good portable fuel tank.

Ok, I''m ready for holes to be shot in this idea...any takers?

Doug
 

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Doug,

I may be wrong, but my understanding of propane, butane and natural gas is they they burn relatively cleanly. Kerosene is essentially a form of diesel fuel, a petroleum product. These may do a fine job of cooking your food, but I imagine it would taste more like diesel fumes than the dinner it was intended to be. Just a thought.

Doug
 

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Okay, other than the grease from your burgers dripping on the burner & fuel line I can''t think why your idea won''t work if properly executed. As a professional Fireman for thirty years the idea makes the hair on the back of my neck stand up. Most liquid fueled burners "prime" with some pressure (pump) than the fuel is vaporized prior to the burner, usually by a metal fuel line passing thru flame. It''s always the flammable vapors that burn because the "vapor pressure" is sufficient to support combustion,(consider the flame you would like to produce >10,000 BTU''s) propane does it at room temp.
I''ll sleep a lot better if you get some propane
 

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Food does not smell or taste of Kerosene when cooked over a Kerosene powered burner. There were 10's of millions of Kerosene powered stoves and ranges produced from 1910 - present. I have a small 2-burner in my Kitchen right now! New ones are still available in Berne Ind. at Swartz Mfg.
The only thing you need to do is place a gas grill style shield over the chimney(s) to keep grease from dripping down onto the wick. You will not need brickettes, the smoke generated by dripping grease on the grease shield produces the flavor, just like a modern gas grill, is all you will need.
 

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If the Post is still searchable, then anybody can see the wrong answer. I was correcting it. Old or not, the info is still correct.
I use and restore Perfection stoves and heaters.
What if the information is not correct, time-warped or not? Those kerosene stoves were for using pots and pans on, not barbecuing food. I'd like to see a picture of a kerosene-fired BBQ grill.
 

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OK then, let's get it correct, the new guy seems to be suggesting the "shield"

This is usually found on gas grilles this plate or shield has to get hot enough to vaporize / burn the oils from the food. It should work BUT if the kero burner was coked up or not up to temp the odor may find its way into the food.

I've never seen a kero fired grille
 

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Food does not smell or taste of Kerosene when cooked over a Kerosene powered burner. There were 10's of millions of Kerosene powered stoves and ranges produced from 1910 - present. I have a small 2-burner in my Kitchen right now! New ones are still available in Berne Ind. at Swartz Mfg.
The only thing you need to do is place a gas grill style shield over the chimney(s) to keep grease from dripping down onto the wick. You will not need brickettes, the smoke generated by dripping grease on the grease shield produces the flavor, just like a modern gas grill, is all you will need.
Yes food does not smell or taste of kero when cooked on a kerosene stovetop because it was in a pan, protected from the soot and fumes of the kerosene burner. Look at the bottom of the pans after cooking, there is quite a bit of soot, even from a properly set up burner on the bottom of the pan, and an oily film. Fine for things cooked in the pan, but on a grill it is directly exposed to the flame, or at least the fumes from the flame. I would certainly think your going to taste that, just like you do if you use too much lighter fluid or don't wait long enough after starting charcoal. Add to that a stiff breeze (the reason your out sailing) blowing past the stern rail and the burner will not exactly stay well tuned likely putting out more soot. Propane is pretty forgiving of air fuel mix, kerosene not so much. I can see it's use as a burner fine but not a grill.
 

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My understanding of propane, butane, and natural gas is that they burn relatively cleanly. Kerosene is a petroleum product that is essentially a type of diesel fuel. These may cook your food well, but I imagine it would taste more like diesel fumes than the meal it was intended to be. Just an idea.
Other than the grease from your burgers dripping on the burner and fuel line, I can"t think of any reason why your idea won"t work if executed properly. As a thirty-year professional firefighter, the thought makes the hair on the back of my neck stand up. Most liquid-fueled burners "prime" with some pressure (pump) before the fuel is vaporised, usually by a metal fuel.
 

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There was a demonstration by one of the major oil burner manufacturers that used to go different HVAC supply houses roasting hot dogs over an oil burner flame to prove how sootless they could burn, but in general fuel oil, diesel, kerosene to not have enough complete combustion to roast foods on an open fire. And the temperatures necessary for complete combustion of such fuels are so high that it makes it impractical nearly impossible to use on something like an open grill,

Some manufacturers of gas grills now use infrared technology which is basically superheating of a metal or ceramic medium that reaches high temperatures and vaporize or burn the fats and oils coming from the food which just can't happen with fossil fuel and not affect flavor
 

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I bake bread in a kero oven. No kero taste. Seems to me if kero was such a problem it would surely show up in bread.
 

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I bake bread in a kero oven. No kero taste. Seems to me if kero was such a problem it would surely show up in bread.
The combustion gases in that type do not go into the oven compartment NOT like a typical gas or electric.
 

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Denise,
The burner is directly under the oven compartment and their is direct communication. Thats how the heat gets there. There is a thin pan that kind of distributes the hot air around. I have some tiles in it to help hold the heat, a common practice. But the hot air wraps up around the pan into the oven compartment.
 

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Denise,
The burner is directly under the oven compartment and their is direct communication. Thats how the heat gets there. There is a thin pan that kind of distributes the hot air around. I have some tiles in it to help hold the heat, a common practice. But the hot air wraps up around the pan into the oven compartment.
Without pictures or knowledge of your actual appliance I am only guessing but from what I know about fossil fuel combustion it would not be designed so that the combustion gases enter the oven compartment

Yes the flame or burner would heat a plate which in turn would provide heat to the oven compartment and the combustion gases flow out a separate vent possibly around the sides I don't know without seeing.
Gas and alcohol flames don't impart soot or flavor into the food that's why those types of ovens are cheaper to build & buy.
 

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Denise,
Combustion gasses enter the oven compartment.
The do on a gas oven as well. Or at least every gas oven I have owned in a home. Older gas ovens had a pilot light that was lite all the time.

Rectangle Schematic Slope Font Parallel
 

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Pressurized Taylor's, yes I know how stoves are built it still looks to me like the Lions share of the combustion gases vent around the sides and the plate at the bottom is the heating medium like a catalytic converter have fun with it I'll stay with the alcohol lol
 

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Interesting video.

Better ways of starting the burner.

Obviously be has made something if a ritual of this and I never challenge a man’s religious beliefs.

I typically do NOT get that yellow flame when starting the burner, it is not necessary. But I suppose some find it comforting? Dunno!

As to the oven, yes the burner is under the “heat deflector.” The gasses wrap around the heat deflector into the oven compartment.

Thus my comment still stands, I have cooked bread and gotten no kerosene smell or taste.

I believe at least one if the above posts noted that the burner would be heating lava coals or some such thing. From using propane grills the oropabe gets the lava hot enough that the meat fat then ignites providing that smokey flavor. I believe a kerosene burner would behave in a nearly identical manner, no kero smell or taste.
 

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Yes that's what a plate, a burner cone, a mantle all do by getting hotter than the gases they work like an afterburner which is probably why you don't get any taste or smell although it probably could get smelly very easily if you're not careful to keep things up to temperature. I have always liked the design of the Primus burners and how they superheat the fuel
 
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