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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there!

My name is Kostis. Actually is a short from Constantine but my mother always called me Kostis.

I am at the category of dreamers. Came in US 4 1/2 years ago, month ago i became citizen last month, and i have always loved the sailboats. Don't have any experience though since i could never afford it. Recently i realized that you can find vessels for a lot less than i thought. So i am dreaming again. I love the contessa 26, the pearson vanguard, and the triton and the cape dorys. Actually i love them because of their prices too. In reality, the style i am crazy about is the pilot cutters.

Now, i have nothing to offer here, so i will just keep on dreaming and keep you company.
 

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Tartan 27' owner
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5,238 Posts
Welcome to Sailnut Kostis!

If you like the older Pearsons & Cape dorys, you might consider the Tartan 27' as it also has that more "old timey" look.
A lot of older boats like this can be had for not that much money. The problem is that even a cheap boat costs a fair amount per year just to own. Slip, mooring & storage fees are the same for both old and brand new boats of the same length. You need to look at what the yearly recurring costs will be before you buy any boat.

A good way to start out is to find a (hopefully) cheap sailing club and join so you can use their boats and get some rudimentary lessons. The size of their boats is mostly irrelevant so you can learn to sail on boats as small and simple as a Sunfish. The more different kinds of small boats you can get on, the more you will learn.

Another angle is to find a sailing club or yacht club that holds organized races and volunteer as crew for the races.

Enjoy the dream!
 

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Kostis,

The is the first phase of the sickness. The time when your judgement fails, your mind wanders and . . . what was I saying? . . . oh yeah, and your perception gets misty. Your pocket book looks bigger than it is. The next phase includes justification of why you "need" the boat, constant trips to Ebay and Craigslist, followed shortly by endless and near pointless email inquiries. By now, the damage is almost irreversible. You doctor your budget and prove to yourself that you can do it. Then, the fever hits, with shaky hands, and a head swimming in second guesses, you purchase the "perfect" boat.

Welcome to the ward.

Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Damn, how do you know i check ebay and craiglist? I already started asking with emails. DO you all do this?????? I also got plans and shopped supplies to build a dinghy.

I have a question. Why can't i anchor the boat???? Why do i need to pay marina fees?
 

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Welcome to SailNet, Kostis! Thanks for stopping by chat. Hopefully you find a well-suited boat, learn to sail extremely well, and explore the world!
 

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Welcome to the mad house.

No matter where you live there is almost certainly a nearby yacht club with racing going on and owners desperate for crew. And if you join the club many have boats free to use for members.
 

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Bring On The Wind
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281 Posts
Welcome to sailnet Kostis, now repeat after me "my name is (say your name) and I sail" this is the first step, recognizing our powerlessness. You're in great company, not only do we sail, we come on here to talk sailing and all it's glory and problems and constantly look at other boats. If my boat had arms I'd get slapped repeatedly.
 

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Old enough to know better
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And i think it is very hard to finance an old boat am i right?
Yes, it is hard to finance an old boat. Basically anything over 12 years the only thing I have heard is a personal load, home equity loan or a veterans loan. Keep it small old and cheap and it will help keep the other costs down. Costs of a boat don't go up with the length, they go up much faster than that. One example is a slip at one local marina is $71 per foot for 20 to 22 foot then $80 a foot for 23 to 32 then when you get to 33 it is $112 a foot and over 46 it jumps to $140 a foot. That is for a six month season. so a 23 foot boat would be $1840 but a 46 footer is $5152. Now the rates will vary due to location and facilities. Sails will be likely 4 or 5 times as much (or more as small boats are often available pre-made) and so will rigging and what not.

Generally putting down an anchor is not wise as they should not be left unattended for very long. But you can put down a mooring (basically a permanent anchor) some places. Some you have to pay a fee to do it, other places it is free once you buy the hardware. If you leave your boat at anchor make sure it is very very good hardware in top shape. Some do it successfully others have not. There was a very sad tale of a young guy a few years ago who left his boat at anchor, it dragged into shallow water and capsized then sank. He struggled for weeks trying to get it back up, but never did.

That said many mooring fields are quite affordable, and well maintained. It is really how accessible you want your boat to be, and how many slips are available. Some places there are many more boats than slips so the marinas can charge what they want, other places there is enough competition that they just want boats in the slips. A mooring field near me I think charges $50 a year, but you have to supply the mooring and it has to meet there standards.
 
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